Classics (CLAS)

Classics (CLAS)

CLAS 1010  The Rise of Rome  (3 Credit Hours)  

This course traces the history of Rome from its earliest foundations to the fall of the Roman republic. While learning about major historical events, we will also explore various aspects of Roman cultural and social history. Topics for discussion include politics, social status, gender roles, religion, warfare, murder and conspiracy, and ancient spectacle. No prerequisites. (Note: Not open to senior history majors)

CLAS 1030  The Greeks  (3 Credit Hours)  

This course offers an introduction to the literature, history, culture, art and architecture of the ancient Greeks. Focusing on Greeks living throughout the Mediterranean from the Bronze Age down to the Hellenistic Period, the course is organized around targeted investigations that explore important aspects of ancient Greek civilization such as colonial expansion, the invention of alphabetic writing, the birth of drama, etc. The aim of the course is not to be exhaustive, but rather to introduce students to the study of antiquity. We will regularly delve into scholarly debate, consider what kinds of evidence underlie our knowledge, and examine the limits of interpretation all while developing our familiarity with the ancient Greeks.

CLAS 1040  Mythology  (3 Credit Hours)  

This course will introduce you to the gods, heroes, and monsters of Greek and Roman mythology. The focus of the course involves reading and discussing selected works of ancient Greek and Roman literature in English translation, but we will also move beyond these narratives to examine how the Greeks and Romans portrayed their myths in other media, including art and architecture.

CLAS 1290  Semester Abroad  (1-20 Credit Hours)  

Study abroad in Classical Studies. Department approval required.

CLAS 1940  Transfer Coursework  (3 Credit Hours)  

For transfer of credit. Department approval required.

CLAS 2020  The High Roman Empire  (3 Credit Hours)  

This course introduces the institutional, social, and cultural changes of the empire from Augustus to Diocletian. Emphasis is placed upon the birth of imperial administration, cultural change and continuity, and the rise of Christianity.

CLAS 2120  The Archaeology of Israel  (3 Credit Hours)  

This course explores the archaeology of the southern Levant from the Bronze Age to the creation of the state of Israel (ca. 3330 B.C.E. - 1948 C.E.). It provides an introduction to the methodology and theory of archaeology and an overview of the material cultures of the complex societies that inhabited the region. Special attention will be paid to cultures of the Israelites, Phoenicians, Philistines, and Arabs and the impact of external imperial rule (from the Egyptians, Assyrians, and Babylonians to the Greeks and Romans) on the life and culture of these socieites. We will also investigate the transformation of the region from the rise of Christianity and the Muslim conquest through emergence of Israel as a modern nation-state. Throughout we will focus on extant texts, inscriptions, material culture such as pottery, figurines, and sculpture, and public, religious, and domestic architecture to reconstruct a detailed picture of this region as a dynamic crossroads of civilizations.

CLAS 2220  New Testament Historical Intro  (3 Credit Hours)  

This course is a literary and historical introduction to the canonical New Testament. It will engage issues of authorship, dating, theology, genre, and special problems related to the scientific" (or scholarly) study of the New Testament. There will be some engagement with literature outside of the canonical New Testament but only as it relates to special issues and topics in New Testament interpretation."

CLAS 2310  Tyrants & Democrats Anc Greece  (3 Credit Hours)  

This course examines the origins and characteristics of basic Greek forms of government in their historical context, concentrating on tyranny and democracy in the archaic and classical periods. The course stresses the development of Greek political institutions and political thought.

CLAS 2320  Ancient Greek Religion  (3 Credit Hours)  

What was the ancient Greek religion about? And how can we know about the religious experience of a population that is long gone? Both these questions are interconnected and represent the core of this course. Week after week, we will reconstruct the principles and articulation of religious beliefs and practice in ancient Greece, reflecting on the evidence we can use. We will discover the ways that religious system mirrors a specific understanding of human society and its place in the universe. And, with it, we will find that, surprisingly or not, that religious system provided a solid base to several modern religious practices.

CLAS 2330  Alexander the Great  (3 Credit Hours)  

This course explores the archaeology of the southern Levant from the Bronze Age to the creation of the state of Israel (ca. 3330 B.C.E. – 1948 C.E.). It provides an introduction to the methodology and theory of archaeology and an overview of the material cultures of the complex societies that inhabited the region. Special attention will be paid to cultures of the Israelites, Phoenicians, Philistines, and Arabs and the impact of external imperial rule (from the Egyptians, Assyrians, and Babylonians to the Greeks and Romans) on the life and culture of these societies. We will also investigate the transformation of the region from the rise of Christianity and the Muslim conquest through the emergence of Israel as a modern nation-state. Throughout we will focus on extant texts, inscriptions, material culture such as pottery, figurines, and sculpture, and public, religious, and domestic architecture to reconstruct a detailed picture of this region as a dynamic crossroads of civilizations.

CLAS 2340  Troy: Beyond the Myth  (3 Credit Hours)  

The Trogan War: famous heroes against each other, astute decoys, tragic deaths, plotting, intrigue, and the gods in the midst of it. Was it all fiction? In this class, we will use literary and archaeological evidence to answer this question.

CLAS 2390  Semester Abroad  (1-20 Credit Hours)  

For transfer of credit. Department approval required.

CLAS 2600  The Classical World in Film  (3 Credit Hours)  

This interdisciplinary course investigates the use of themes from classical history, literature, and mythology in modern cinematography. Its focal point is the artistic appropriation of these themes in service of a fresh literary and cinematic vision. Films with classical themes are viewed as a part of the process of creative imitation and reinvention of a “classic”. Each segment of the course discusses a specific theme, starting with the thorough analysis of the relative ancient texts and material culture/archaeology. Reading assignments will include selections from Greek and Roman, such as epic, tragedy, history, lyric poetry, philosophy, and novel. The readings will be flanked by a selection of movies and clips that show modern adaptations of the same theme discussed in the readings.

CLAS 2610  Sex and Gender in Antiquity  (3 Credit Hours)  

This course explores a wide range of topics related to sexuality and gender in the ancient Mediterranean. Using ancient literary sources, inscriptions, artwork, and modern scholarship, we will try to reconstruct Greek and Roman attitudes about sexuality and gender at different places and different times. In particular, we will focus on the depiction of female leadership in ancient literature, and will consider the following questions: How do the male writers of antiquity describe female leaders? Do they display the same attributes of leadership as their male counterparts, or is there something distinctly feminine about their mode of leadership? Are women depicted in leaders in various spheres of activity (battle, home, politics, etc.)? Is there always a sense of transgression or inferiority associated with female leadership? Do literary depictions match the primary evidence that documents the roles of women in their communities? How can these ancient texts inform the current debates about women in leadership roles?

CLAS 2810  Special Topics  (3 Credit Hours)  

Special topics in Classical Studies focused on particular areas and issues in the fields of ancient culture, religion, history, and/or archaeology.

CLAS 2811  Special Topics  (3 Credit Hours)  

Special topics in Classical Studies focused on particular areas and issues in the fields of ancient culture, religion, history, and/or archaeology.

CLAS 2940  Transfer Coursework  (0 Credit Hours)  

For transfer of credit. Department approval required.

CLAS 3050  Archaeology Lab: Ashkelon  (3 Credit Hours)  

The field archaeology lab in Ashkelon Israel will introduce students to process of artifact analysis, cataloguing, and recording. Students will work alongside professional staff sorting, cleaning, registering, and analyzing finds from the current excavations such as pottery, figurines, glass, worked stone, faunal remains, and other objects. Students will learn how to make preliminary readings of the artifacts and will also be introduced to methods of scientific analysis, including flotation, petrography, xrf, 3d scanning, and ftir analysis.

Corequisite(s): CLAS 4050.

CLAS 3060  Greek Tragedy & Comedy  (3 Credit Hours)  

In this class, we will read several ancient plays (in English translation) written in 5th century Athens alongside a series of 20th and 21st century plays from Nazi occupied France, apartheid-era South Africa, and Nigeria (during the Iraq War) that draw on these ancient plays for inspiration in radically different political and cultural climates.

CLAS 3080  Inventing Socrates  (3 Credit Hours)  

Socrates has greater name recognition than almost anyone in antiquity and yet he left behind no record of his teachings. Instead, his legacy has been shaped by the accounts of others - former students, bemused comedians, admirers and even a few detractors. In this course, we will examine the many faces of Socrates bequeathed to us by his contemporaries, investigate the world of 5th century Athens in which he lived, and survey important moments in his posthumous reception.

CLAS 3090  Law & Society In Ancient Rome  (3 Credit Hours)  

In this course we will focus on the law of the Roman family, covering such topics as personal status, marriage, divorce, and inheritance, as well as the situation of women and children within the Roman family.

CLAS 3120  Etruscans & Early Rome  (3 Credit Hours)  

From the Late Bronze Age until their assimilation into the Roman world, the Etruscans were building cities, decorating tombs, and establishing trade networks at home and abroad. While their literature and written history are lost, their extensive material culture survives. In this course, students will learn how to examine a culture known primarily from its artifacts and discover how it influenced early Rome.

CLAS 3140  Jews in the Greco-Roman World  (3 Credit Hours)  

This course will explore Jewish interaction and conflict with Greeks and Romans from the Babylonian exile through the destruction of the temple in Jerusalem. We will examine the rich body of literature and material culture from this period to reconstruct the Jewish experience in both Palestine and the Diaspora communities in Egypt, Asia Minor, and Rome. The course will consider texts written by Jews as well as Greeks and Romans, representing both sides of this exchange, and archaeological evidence that sheds light on daily life in the period. Topics will include: the Maccabean Revolt, the Hasmonean dynasty, Herod the Great, the Alexandrian riots of 38 CE, Jewish religion and sectarianism, the Dead Sea Scrolls, and the Jewish Revolts.

CLAS 3160  The Aegean Bronze Age  (3 Credit Hours)  

The civilizations that populated the Aegean during the Bronze Age were later remembered in mythology, fabulous tales, and epic poetry. Homer sang about the cultural wealth of those earlier kingdoms, from Crete to Mainland Greece. This course offers you the chance to explore their rich and varied archaeological remains. From the majestic palaces to the elaborate frescoes, the decorated pottery, the administrative records, and other material evidence, we will reconstruct the life and activities of the populations of the Aegean from the beginning to the end of the Bronze Age. In our journey, we will also stop and discuss the archaeological methodologies and the current topics of investigation on the Aegean Bronze Age.

CLAS 3170  Greek Art & Archaeology  (3 Credit Hours)  

In this course, we will explore the archaeological remains and the development and use of specific artistic trends of the ancient Greek culture. Human inhabitation of Greece left the remains of a rich and complex society, with grandiose public architecture, elaborate vase painting, and a legacy that still lives on. Working together as a class, we will explore how to use these material remains to find the Greeks, interpret their lives, and understand their choices and the impact they had on their culture. By studying a variety of archaeological remains, from pottery to art and architecture, we will bring the Greeks back to life, in class, with us! We will cover aspects of Greek political organization, trade and contact with other civilizations in the ancient Mediterranean, funerary habits. At the same time, we will be discussing about our modern approach to the study of the Greeks, focusing on the use of art and archaeology in politics and propaganda, current problems and controversies in Greek archaeology, archaeological methods, and issues of archaeological ethics.

CLAS 3180  Roman Art & Archaeology  (3 Credit Hours)  

The Roman Empire encompassed the entire rim of the Mediterranean Sea and much of western Europe. This course will undertake an intensive analysis of the material culture of ancient Rome through its art and archaeology. In successfully completing the semester, you will gain a thorough knowledge of the art and archaeology of ancient Rome and its world, focusing especially on changes through time and on the political, social, and economic developments that are illuminated by material remains. We will also discuss current issues related to Roman antiquities and the preservation of world cultural heritage. Working together as a class, we will learn how to use the archaeological record to reconstruct the past, while at the same time examining our own culture and its role in human history.

CLAS 3190  Pompeii:Life in a Roman Town  (3 Credit Hours)  

The Roman city of Pompeii, utterly destroyed by the eruption of Mt. Vesuvius in 79 C.E., has captured the world’s imagination for nearly three centuries. This semester, we will examine the material remains of Pompeii, analyzing how evidence as diverse as standing architecture, monumental inscriptions, portable and permanent art, and even garbage and graffiti can be used to reconstruct ancient lives. Working together as a class, we will investigate the development of Pompeian studies from the earliest systematic excavations of the 1750s to current projects utilizing groundbreaking technologies, and propose new directions for future research in a city that has many more secrets to reveal.

CLAS 3230  Ancient Christianity  (3 Credit Hours)  

In this course we examine the development of Christianity in the Roman Empire during the first four centuries CE. We will consider both the development of the Church from its beginnings as a religious movement to its becoming one of the dominant institutions in the Roman Empire. We will investigate how the Church gained converts, how it was structured, the relationship between orthodox Christianity and ‘heresies,’ the Church's conflicts with the Roman Empire, and the changes in the Church resulting from the conversion of Constantine in the early fourth century.

CLAS 3320  The Greek Way of Death  (3 Credit Hours)  

Death-ritual was an important social institution in ancient Greece. Through their funerals and tombs, the ancient Greeks negotiated social relationships and political ideologies, celebrated the state and the legacies of individuals, and grappled with the uncertainties and fragility of life. In this course we will look at textual and archaeological evidence from the ancient Greek world as we explore attitudes toward life and death and how important customs, rituals, and traditions function in society.

CLAS 3510  The Ancient Novel  (3 Credit Hours)  

We are all familiar today with the literary form called the novel: a lengthy fictional narrative in prose. It was ancient Greek and Latin authors, however, who first created this form. Many of these works survive and they always intrigue and delight readers with their highly sophisticated plotting of love affairs, comical depictions of pirates, and teasing explorations of sexuality. We will closely read, in English translation, the major ancient novels and some of their literary predecessors in order to understand the originality of the form and content of the novels. The class concludes with a consideration of the ancient novel's contribution to the development of fiction in the West.

CLAS 3810  Special Topics  (3 Credit Hours)  

Special topics in Classical Studies focused on particular areas and issues in the fields of ancient culture, religion, history, and/or archaeology.

CLAS 3811  Special Topics  (3 Credit Hours)  

Special topics in Classical Studies focused on particular areas and issues in the fields of ancient culture, religion, history, and/or archaeology.

CLAS 3891  Service Learning: CLAS 3090  (0-1 Credit Hours)  

Service learning section accompanying CLAS 3090 Law & Society in Ancient Rome.

Corequisite(s): CLAS 3090.

CLAS 3899  Service Learning: CLAS 3090  (1 Credit Hour)  

Service learning section accompanying CLAS 3090 Law & Society in Ancient Rome.

Corequisite(s): CLAS 3090.

CLAS 3940  Transfer Coursework  (3 Credit Hours)  

For transfer of credit. Department approval required.

CLAS 4050  Intro to Field Arch: Ashkelon  (3 Credit Hours)  

This is an interdisciplinary course of archaeological fieldwork based in experiential learning at a complex, multi-period Tell site on the southern Levantine coast. Students work five full days plus one half-day in the field uncovering artifacts and learning archaeological field techniques.

Corequisite(s): CLAS 3050.

CLAS 4060  Classical Epic  (3 Credit Hours)  

This course will offer a detailed survey of Greek and Roman epic poetry from Homer’s Iliad to Lucan’s Bellum Civile, with specific attention paid to the production and performance contexts of each text. Over the course of the semester, students will become familiar with the central themes and issues of the epic genre and consider what differentiates poems written in different times and places. Specific topics to be investigated include the role of the gods in mortal affairs, tensions between fate and human agency, how to negotiate personal tragedies within larger conflicts, the relationship between individuals and their society, and the intimate connection between poet and his subject. All texts will be read in translation.

CLAS 4080  Sem Anc Society & Econ  (3,4 Credit Hours)  

Seminar on topics involving ancient society and economy, for example, Slavery in Ancient Society or Family in Ancient Rome. May be repeated when the topic is different. (NOTE: 3 credits/4 credits when offered as Tier 2 writing intensive).

CLAS 4110  Leadership in Class Antiquity  (3 Credit Hours)  

Who is a good leader, or a bad leader? Why? How do you know? How do you become one or the other? Our answers to these questions can often be traced back to the ancient Greeks and Romans, who are not only summoned up as models for modern leaders, but who also told stories, sang songs, and debated about what leadership means. This course will combine texts and objects, ancient and modern sources, lecture and discussion in a thorough exploration of leadership in antiquity. Assignments will include readings, self-diagnostic quizzes, essays, reflective journals, and a collaborative final project.

CLAS 4170  Sem Greek Art & Archaeo I  (3,4 Credit Hours)  

This is a seminar featuring current topics in Greek art and archaeology that are studied through the use of primary texts (histories, literature, inscriptions) as well as secondary scholarship. The topics offered under this heading may include Monuments of Ancient Athens, Greece in the Archaic Age, Knossos & Its Afterlife, and Mycenaean Citadels. May be repeated when topic is different. (NOTE: 3 credits/4 credits when offered as Tier 2 writing intensive).

CLAS 4180  Sem Greek Art & Archaeo II  (3,4 Credit Hours)  

This seminar features topics in Greek art and archaeology where the analysis of material culture and what it can illuminate about Greek society are emphasized. Methods and scholarship from the social sciences are included. Students should expect to do close readings of second scholarship and perform independent research. Topics in this seminar may include Greek Pottery, Greece in the Iron Age, and Topics in Aegean Prehistory. (NOTE: 3 credits/4 credits when offered as Tier 2 writing intensive).

CLAS 4190  Sem Greek Art & Archaeo III  (3,4 Credit Hours)  

This seminar features topics in Greek art and archaeology that employ methods of art history, including the appreciation of the aesthetics of ancient art. Topics may include Greek Vase Painting, Greek Sculpture, and Classical Athens. (NOTE: 3 credits/4 credits when offered as Tier 2 writing intensive).

CLAS 4200  Sem Roman Art & Archaeo I  (3,4 Credit Hours)  

The seminar features topics in Roman art and archaeology that are studied through the use of primary texts (histories, literature, inscriptions) as well as secondary scholarship. The topics offered under this heading may include Monuments of Ancient Rome, Building the City of Rome, and the World of Augustus. (NOTE: 3 credits/4 credits when offered as Tier 2 writing intensive).

CLAS 4210  Sem Roman Art & Archaeo II  (3,4 Credit Hours)  

This seminar features topics in Roman art and archaeology where the analysis of material culture and what it can illuminate about Roman society are emphasized. Methods and scholarship from the social sciences are included. Student should expect to do close readings of secondary scholarship and perform independent research. Topics may include Gender in Roman Archaeology and Death in Roman Cities. May be repeated when topic is different. (NOTE: 3 credits/4 credits when offered as Tier 2 writing intensive).

CLAS 4220  Sem Roman Art & Archaeo III  (3,4 Credit Hours)  

This seminar features topics in Roman art and archaeology that employ methods of art history, including the appreciation of the aesthetics of ancient art. Topics include Ancient Painting and Mosaics and Roman Sculpture in Context. May be repeated when topic is different (NOTE: 3 credits/4 credits when offered as Tier 2 writing intensive).

CLAS 4320  War & Power in Ancient Greece  (3 Credit Hours)  

In this course we will look at ancient Greek warfare and state formation, including how states developed and changed, how and why the ancient Greeks interacted and fought with each other and with outsiders, and what were the immediate outcomes and long-term consequences of endogenous and exogenous power struggles. Students will gain an understanding of the particular roles played by factors such as geography, military innovations, socio-political institutions, individual leaders, ideological shifts, and specific series of decisions and events

Prerequisite(s): CLAS 3310 or HISA 3080.

CLAS 4810  Special Topics  (3 Credit Hours)  

Special topics in Classical Studies focused on particular areas and issues in the fields of ancient culture, religion, history, and/or archaeology.

CLAS 4811  Special Topics  (3 Credit Hours)  

Special topics in Classical Studies focused on particular areas and issues in the fields of ancient culture, religion, history, and/or archaeology.

CLAS 4900  Seminar in Classical Culture  (3,4 Credit Hours)  

The seminar features topics that examine aspects of society and culture in the Greek and/or Roman world. While these topics are approached primarily through literature in translation and historical texts, where appropriate, these topics may also include some units on material culture and art. Topics of this course may include The Age of Perikles, Individuals & Communities in Greece and Rome, Alexandria Cosmopolis, Greeks and Barbarians, and Afterlives of Antigone.

CLAS 4910  Independent Study  (3 Credit Hours)  

Independent study on particular areas or issues of ancient culture, religion, history, and/or archaeology. Open to superior students provided approval of department is granted and an appropriate faculty director is available.

CLAS 4920  Independent Study  (3 Credit Hours)  

Independent study on particular areas or issues of ancient culture, religion, history, and/or archaeology. Open to superior students provided approval of department is granted and an appropriate faculty director is available.

CLAS 4990  Honors Thesis  (3 Credit Hours)  

Course reserved for students writing an honors thesis for a major in classical studies. Requires approval of the department and an appropriate faculty director.

CLAS 5000  Honors Thesis  (4 Credit Hours)  

Course reserved for students writing an honors thesis for a major in classical studies. Requires approval of the department and an appropriate faculty director.

CLAS 5190  Semester Abroad  (1-20 Credit Hours)  

Study abroad in Classical Studies. Department approval required.

CLAS 5370  Washington Semester  (1-20 Credit Hours)  

For transfer of credit. Department approval required.

CLAS 5380  Junior Year Abroad  (1-20 Credit Hours)  

Study abroad in Classical Studies. Department approval required.

CLAS 5390  Junior Year Abroad  (1-20 Credit Hours)  

Study abroad in Classical Studies. Department approval required.

CLAS 5940  Transfer Coursework  (0 Credit Hours)  

For transfer of credit. Department approval required.

CLAS 6080  Sem Anc Society & Econ  (3 Credit Hours)  

Seminar on topics involving ancient society and economy, for example, Slavery in Ancient Society or Family in Ancient Rome. May be repeated when the topic is different. Open to Graduate Students.

CLAS 6170  Sem Greek Art & Archaeo I  (3 Credit Hours)  

This is a seminar featuring current topics in Greek art and archaeology that are studied through the use of primary texts (histories, literature, inscriptions) as well as secondary scholarship. The topics offered under this heading may include Monuments of Ancient Athens, Greece in the Archaic Age, Knossos & Its Afterlife, and Mycenaean Citadels. May be repeated when topic is different. (NOTE: 3 credits/4 credits when offered as Tier 2 writing intensive).

CLAS 6180  Sem Greek Art & Archaeo II  (3 Credit Hours)  

This seminar features topics in Greek art and archaeology where the analysis of material culture and what it can illuminate about Greek society are emphasized. Methods and scholarship from the social sciences are included. Students should expect to do close readings of second scholarship and perform independent research. Topics in this seminar may include Greek Pottery, Greece in the Iron Age, and Topics in Aegean Prehistory.

CLAS 6190  Sem Greek Art & Archaeo III  (3 Credit Hours)  

This seminar features topics in Greek art and archaeology that employ methods of art history, including the appreciation of the aesthetics of ancient art. Topics may include Greek Vase Painting, Greek Sculpture, and Classical Athens.

CLAS 6200  Sem Roman Art & Archaeo I  (3 Credit Hours)  

The seminar features topics in Roman art and archaeology that are studied through the use of primary texts (histories, literature, inscriptions) as well as secondary scholarship. The topics offered under this heading may include Monuments of Ancient Rome, Building the City of Rome, and the World of Augustus.

CLAS 6210  Sem Roman Art & Archaeo II  (3 Credit Hours)  

This seminar features topics in Roman art and archaeology where the analysis of material culture and what it can illuminate about Roman society are emphasized. Methods and scholarship from the social sciences are included. Student should expect to do close readings of secondary scholarship and perform independent research. Topics may include Gender in Roman Archaeology and The Roman Way of Death. Open to graduate students.

CLAS 6220  Sem Roman Art & Archaeo III  (3 Credit Hours)  

This seminar features topics in Roman art and archaeology that employ methods of art history, including the appreciation of the aesthetics of ancient art. Topics include Ancient Painting and Mosaics and Roman Sculpture in Context. Open to graduate students. May be repeated when topic is different.

CLAS 6300  Summer Seminar in Rome  (1-6 Credit Hours)  

Study abroad in Classical Studies. Open to Graduate Students only. Registration requires department approval.

CLAS 6320  War & Power in Ancient Greece  (3 Credit Hours)  

In this course we will look at ancient Greek warfare and state formation, including how states developed and changed, how and why the ancient Greeks interacted and fought with each other and with outsiders, and what were the immediate outcomes and long-term consequences of endogenous and exogenous power struggles. Students will gain an understanding of the particular roles played by factors such as geography, military innovations, socio-political institutions, individual leaders, ideological shifts, and specific series of decisions and events

CLAS 6810  Special Topics  (3 Credit Hours)  

Special topics in Classical Studies focused on particular areas and issues in the fields of ancient culture, religion, history, and/or archaeology.

CLAS 6811  Special Topics  (3 Credit Hours)  

Special topics in Classical Studies focused on particular areas and issues in the fields of ancient culture, religion, history, and/or archaeology.

CLAS 6900  Seminar in Classical Culture  (3 Credit Hours)  

The seminar features topics that examine aspects of society and culture in the Greek and/or Roman world. While these topics are approached primarily through literature in translation and historical texts, where appropriate, these topics may also include some units on material culture and art. Topics of this course may include The Age of Perikles, Individuals & Communities in Greece and Rome, Alexandria Cosmopolis, Greeks and Barbarians, and Afterlives of Antigone.

CLAS 6910  Independent Study  (1-3 Credit Hours)  

Independent study on particular areas or issues of ancient culture, religion, history, and/or archaeology. Open to graduate students provided approval of department is granted and an appropriate faculty director is available.

CLAS 6920  Independent Study  (1-3 Credit Hours)  

Independent study on particular areas or issues of ancient culture, religion, history, and/or archaeology. Open to graduate students provided approval of department is granted and an appropriate faculty director is available.

CLAS 7890  Thesis Research  (3 Credit Hours)  

Course reserved for students writing a thesis for the Master's degree in classical studies. Requires approval of the department and an appropriate faculty director.

CLAS 7910  Independent Study  (3 Credit Hours)  

Graduate-level independent study in Classical Studies. Department approval required.

CLAS 9980  Masters Research  (0 Credit Hours)  

Course reserved for students writing a thesis for the Master's degree in classical studies. Requires approval of the department and an appropriate faculty director.