Architecture (ARCH)

Architecture (ARCH)

ARCH 1001  Tactile Design in Architecture  (3)  

At the root of the architecture discipline is the study of design. In this two-week course, students will focus on analog techniques of design utilizing hand drawing, mixed media exploration, and physical model making. The course will allow students to embrace the tactile facets of the creative process as a foundation of Architecture and its allied fields. You will explore the city of New Orleans with your sketchbook, experiencing the spatial, environmental, and cultural context of New Orleans, while creating beautiful work that will be digitally archived for your professional portfolio.

ARCH 1002  Digital Design in Architecture  (3)  

This two-week course will focus on visual and spatial communication through digital media. Students will learn the Adobe Creative Suite (Photoshop, Illustrator, lnDesign) as well as 3d modeling software to express their design ideas. We will explore the realms of digital design, representation, and production as a means of communicating information in a visual and compelling way. Students will have also the opportunity to create within our digital laboratory that includes laser cutters, 3d printers, a CNC router, and 3d scanner. You will work with innovative digital tools to compile a portfolio of work that is lively, relevant and professional.

ARCH 1003  Architecture: Real Estate  (3)  

Real Estate will introduce students to the fundamentals of real estate development, focusing on the complex forces and relationships that shape the built environment. In addition to class time and field trips, students will spend 15-hours of the curriculum collaborating on the Urban Land lnstitute's (ULI) Urban Plan project, which is a nationally recognized case assignment requiring students to form development teams to respond to a "request for proposals" for the redevelopment of a blighted site in a fictional community. The UrbanPlan project is conducted nationally at the high school, undergraduate, and graduate levels.

ARCH 1011  Architecture Studio  (6)  

As an introduction to the basic fundamental methods and principles of architectural design, students are given an immediate experience of the design process, developing their capacity to conceive, manipulate and analyze architectural form and space. An emphasis on verbal skills, and graphic and material techniques for architectural representation, enable students to express and communicate their ideas. The studio develops the students' capacity for critical thinking through constructive evaluation.

ARCH 1012  Architecture Studio  (6)  

As an introduction to the basic fundamental methods and principles of architectural design, students are given an immediate experience of the design process, developing their capacity to conceive, manipulate and analyze architectural form and space. An emphasis on verbal skills, and graphic and material techniques for architectural representation, enable students to express and communicate their ideas. The studio develops the students' capacity for critical thinking through constructive evaluation. Prerequisite(s): ARCH 1011.

Prerequisite(s): ARCH 1011.

ARCH 1110  Intro to Architecture  (3)  

ARCH 1111  Topics in Architecture History/Theory  (1.5)  

This is one of four required half-semester courses introducing students to architectural history and theory by exposing them to a broad range of architectural origins, buildings examples and influences. The goal of the architecture history and theory course sequence is to prepare students to become accomplished researchers—well able to connect a useful taxonomy of architectural examples to contemporary issues and ambitions. Each of the courses begins with a contemporary figure in architectural practice and proceeds in a reverse chronology to explore the precedents and linages of thought that have been synthesized in the work of that contemporary practice. Teaching by example, these courses will offer a lesson in how distant antecedents support and continue to inform the discipline today. By exploring both a western and a non-western canon from a broader range of voices and vantage points, students will learn to further contextualize the basic architectural vocabulary acquired in their introductory courses. Corequisite(s): ARCH 1112.

Corequisite(s): ARCH 1112.

ARCH 1112  Topics in Architecture History/Theory  (1.5)  

This is one of four required half-semester courses introducing students to architectural history and theory by exposing them to a broad range of architectural origins, buildings examples and influences. The goal of the architecture history and theory course sequence is to prepare students to become accomplished researchers—well able to connect a useful taxonomy of architectural examples to contemporary issues and ambitions. Each of the courses begins with a contemporary figure in architectural practice and proceeds in a reverse chronology to explore the precedents and linages of thought that have been synthesized in the work of that contemporary practice. Teaching by example, these courses will offer a lesson in how distant antecedents support and continue to inform the discipline today. By exploring both a western and a non-western canon from a broader range of voices and vantage points, students will learn to further contextualize the basic architectural vocabulary acquired in their introductory courses. Corequisite(s): ARCH 1111.

Corequisite(s): ARCH 1111.

ARCH 1121  History and Theory of Architecture and Urbanism I  (3)  

Discover the foundation and evolution of architectural tradition in this survey course, starting with prehistoric developments in Europe and continuing through the medieval period. This course is global in focus, including both Western and non-Western developments. The survey highlights a variety of aspects of the built environment such as architecture, urban settlements and landscapes. Coursework investigates monumental civic architecture, religious structures, as well as domestic buildings, the urban form, and architectural theory.

ARCH 1901  Special Topics  (1-3)  

Special Topics in Career Explorations. These are special workshops for pre-college students. Title and content may vary by summer term. See the Schedule of Classes or Summer School website for specific offerings.

ARCH 1940  Transfer Coursework  (0-20)  

Transfer Coursework at the 1000 level. Departmental approval may be required.


Maximum Hours: 99

ARCH 2021  Architecture Studio  (6)  

Second year studio concentrates on developed architectural form and design methodologies through processes of analysis, synthesis and transformation. Students work on the conceptual frameworks for their designs, with emphasis on issues of environmental context, urban design, and cultural and technological systems and their impact on architectural form. Different approaches to the making of form are investigated, along with principles of organization, such as spatial hierarchy, circulation, structure, and site relationships. Second semester will emphasize the relationship of design to cultural precedents, site conditions, programs, and material tectonics through the study of housing. Second year studios will be fully integrated with digital media classes to ensure that students gain fluency in computer aided design processes, drawing, spatial modeling and digital design techniques. Prerequisite(s): ARCH 1012 or DSGN 1200.

Prerequisite(s): ARCH 1012 or DSGN 1200.

ARCH 2022  Architecture Studio  (6)  

Second year studio concentrates on developed architectural form and design methodologies through processes of analysis, synthesis and transformation. Students work on the conceptual frameworks for their designs, with emphasis on issues of environmental context, urban design, and cultural and technological systems and their impact on architectural form. Different approaches to the making of form are investigated, along with principles of organization, such as spatial hierarchy, circulation, structure, and site relationships. Second semester will emphasize the relationship of design to cultural precedents, site conditions, programs, and material tectonics through the study of housing. Second year studios will be fully integrated with digital media classes to ensure that students gain fluency in computer aided design processes, drawing, spatial modeling and digital design techniques. Prerequisite(s): ARCH 2021.

Prerequisite(s): ARCH 2021.

ARCH 2113  Topics in Architecture History/Theory  (1.5)  

This is one of four required half-semester courses introducing students to architectural history and theory by exposing them to a broad range of architectural origins, buildings examples and influences. The goal of the architecture history and theory course sequence is to prepare students to become accomplished researchers—well able to connect a useful taxonomy of architectural examples to contemporary issues and ambitions. Each of the courses begins with a contemporary figure in architectural practice and proceeds in a reverse chronology to explore the precedents and linages of thought that have been synthesized in the work of that contemporary practice. Teaching by example, these courses will offer a lesson in how distant antecedents support and continue to inform the discipline today. By exploring both a western and a non-western canon from a broader range of voices and vantage points, students will learn to further contextualize the basic architectural vocabulary acquired in their introductory courses. Corequisite(s): ARCH 2114.

Corequisite(s): ARCH 2114.

ARCH 2114  Topics in Architecture History/Theory  (1.5)  

This is one of four required half-semester courses introducing students to architectural history and theory by exposing them to a broad range of architectural origins, buildings examples and influences. The goal of the architecture history and theory course sequence is to prepare students to become accomplished researchers—well able to connect a useful taxonomy of architectural examples to contemporary issues and ambitions. Each of the courses begins with a contemporary figure in architectural practice and proceeds in a reverse chronology to explore the precedents and linages of thought that have been synthesized in the work of that contemporary practice. Teaching by example, these courses will offer a lesson in how distant antecedents support and continue to inform the discipline today. By exploring both a western and a non-western canon from a broader range of voices and vantage points, students will learn to further contextualize the basic architectural vocabulary acquired in their introductory courses. Corequisite(s): ARCH 2113.

Corequisite(s): ARCH 2113.

ARCH 2122  History and Theory of Architecture and Urbanism II  (3)  

The course covers the period from the Enlightenment through the early-Modern and high-Modern periods. While the course will emphasize the late-eighteenth (Enlightenment) creation of canonical pedagogies and strategies as foundational texts, it will also include nineteenth-century urbanism and landscapes, both of which condition the formation of material culture in the early- and mid-twentieth centuries. The course is written expressly for students of architecture; we will concentrate not only on the identification and formation of urban artifacts, buildings, architects, and movements, but also on the social, political, and historical context surrounding their genesis and development. The course material is presented according to successive themes, thereby facilitating not only an emphasis on the artifacts and their context, but also on the discourse that supports architecture as a discipline. These themes provide insight into the various motivations and ideas, upon which the history of Modern Architecture rests. In presenting the material in this manner, it is hoped that students will understand that history--in particular the history embedded in the material of architecture--indeed resonates through time, becoming relevant and vital to the genesis and formation of current and future architectural discourse.

Prerequisite(s): ARCH 1121 or AHST 3010.

ARCH 2211  Site Strategies  (3)  

ARCH 2212  Materials and Methods  (3)  

ARCH 2213  Building, Climate, Comfort  (4)  

Prerequisite(s): PHYS 1050, 1210 or 1310. Corequisite(s): ARCH 2223.

Prerequisite(s): PHYS 1050, 1210 or 1310.

Corequisite(s): ARCH 2223.

ARCH 2223  Building, Climate, Comfort Lab  (0)  

Corequisite(s): ARCH 2213.

Corequisite(s): ARCH 2213.

ARCH 2311  Digital Media  (3)  

An introductory course to 3D digital media concepts and techniques with a focus on the fundamental aspects of the Computer Aided Design process. Framed by a general introduction to digital media theory, students will gain fluency in a variety of software applications for the purpose of expanding the architectural design process. Specific emphasis is placed on the role of the computer as a tool for analysis, spatial investigation, and representation. Basic 3D modeling software such as AutoCad, Form.z and Rhino, will constitute the majority of course content.

ARCH 2322  Digital Media Workshop I  (1)  

Each one-credit course in the digital media workshop series provides intermediate and/or advanced instruction in digital media tools and techniques in coordination with its co-required second or third-year architectural design studio course. Corequisite(s): ARCH 2022.

Corequisite(s): ARCH 2022.

ARCH 2327  Intro to Spatial Painting  (3)  

ARCH 2710  The City I  (3)  

ARCH 2720  The City II  (3)  

ARCH 2890  Service Learning  (0-1)  

Students complete a service activity in the community in conjunction with the content of a three-credit co-requisite course. Course may be repeated up to unlimited credit hours.


Maximum Hours: 99

ARCH 2892  Service Learning  (0-1)  

Students complete a service activity in the community in conjunction with the content of a three-credit co-requisite course. Course may be repeated up to unlimited credit hours.


Maximum Hours: 99

ARCH 2940  Transfer Coursework  (0-20)  

Transfer Coursework at the 2000 level. Department approval may be required.


Maximum Hours: 99

ARCH 3031  Architecture Studio  (6)  

The first semester of third year will introduce students to urbanism and the city, focusing on the larger environmental context for architectural design. The second semester of third year is the culmination of the required studio sequence and is fully integrated with coursework in history/theory, technology, visual/digital media and professional concerns. Architecture 320 provides an opportunity for the student to synthesize the skills and ideas developed through two and a half years of work and apply these to the comprehensive development of a design project. Students will engage in a complex architectural project situated within an urban environment. The studio will include analysis and design at the scale of the neighborhood or the city, as well as thorough and detailed design of a large building with a complex program. Emphasis is placed on a comprehensive process including the thorough analysis of site issues and architectural precedents, detailed design development of the project, and the coordination and integration of structural, environmental and material systems in the design-work. Students will also develop skills in programming, building information modeling and management, digital fabrication methods and the production of complex digital models and working drawings through fully integrated coursework which will act as a support for the design process. Prerequisite(s): ARCH 2022 or DSGN 2200.

Prerequisite(s): ARCH 2022 or DSGN 2200.

ARCH 3032  Architecture Studio  (6)  

The first semester of third year will introduce students to urbanism and the city, focusing on the larger environmental context for architectural design. The second semester of third year is the culmination of the required studio sequence and is fully integrated with coursework in history/theory, technology, visual/digital media and professional concerns. Architecture 320 provides an opportunity for the student to synthesize the skills and ideas developed through two and a half years of work and apply these to the comprehensive development of a design project. Students will engage in a complex architectural project situated within an urban environment. The studio will include analysis and design at the scale of the neighborhood or the city, as well as thorough and detailed design of a large building with a complex program. Emphasis is placed on a comprehensive process including the thorough analysis of site issues and architectural precedents, detailed design development of the project, and the coordination and integration of structural, environmental and material systems in the design-work. Students will also develop skills in programming, building information modeling and management, digital fabrication methods and the production of complex digital models and working drawings through fully integrated coursework which will act as a support for the design process. Prerequisite(s): ARCH 3031*. (* May be taken concurrently.)

Prerequisite(s): ARCH 3031*.
* May be taken concurrently.

ARCH 3130  Architectural Research Methods  (3)  

This course introduces students to various research paradigms to engage and produce architectural scholarship. Architectural Research Methods will include weekly readings and written responses, a literature review of relevant texts, and a proposal for a research topic. Students will develop skills necessary to support their work in research-based Option Studios and other courses with expectations of scholarly outputs.

ARCH 3144  Philosophies of Architecture  (3)  

This seminar begins with a consideration of philosophy as a foundation for the development of an architectural theory. After a discussion of some basic concepts and terms we sketch a broad outline of the categories and organization of the discipline of philosophy. We then study the rationalist and empiricist positions in architectural theory, the emergence of Kantian critical philosophy, the shift in emphasis in 20th century philosophy from epistemology to ontology that is characteristic of Existentialism, and the late 20th century attack on traditional epistemology characteristic of poststructuralism. We then discuss the emergence of literary theory as a paradigmatic discipline in the last 30 years as well as the expansion of western philosophy to include aspects of Zen Buddhism, Taoism, and eastern mystical traditions. With this foundation, the course focuses more specifically on theories of architecture and aesthetics and their relationships to various philosophical positions.

Prerequisite(s): ARCH 1111, 1112, 2113, 2114 or 1121.

ARCH 3214  Structural Systems  (4)  

Prerequisite(s): PHYS 1050, 1210 or 1310.

Prerequisite(s): PHYS 1050, 1210 or 1310.

ARCH 3215  Integrated Building Systems  (4)  

Prerequisite(s): (ARCH 2211* or ATCS 3010*) and (ARCH 2212* or ATCS 3020*) and (ARCH 2213* or ATCS 3030*) and (ARCH 3214* or ATCS 4010*). * May be taken concurrently.

Prerequisite(s): (ARCH 2211* or ATCS 3010*) and (ARCH 2212* or ATCS 3020*) and (ARCH 2213* or ATCS 3030*) and (ARCH 3214* or ATCS 4010*).
* May be taken concurrently.

ARCH 3239  Space Arch/Walking Cities/Fut.  (3)  

ARCH 3312  Advanced Digital Media  (3)  

The second course of the digital media sequence covers advance techniques for digital drawing, modeling, and image production. Students will continue to explore techniques for orthographic, axonometric, and perspective projection drawing. Advanced topics will include representation techniques such as texture mapping, rendering (raytracing, global illumination, high dynamic range images, etc.), animation, procedural modeling, and parametric modeling. Software covered in the course will include Rhino, Grasshopper, V Ray, and 3DS Max. Prerequisite(s): ARCH 2311.

Prerequisite(s): ARCH 2311.

ARCH 3331  Digital Media Workshop II  (1)  

Each one-credit course in the digital media workshop series provides intermediate and/or advanced instruction in digital media tools and techniques in coordination with its co-required second or third-year architectural design studio course. Corequisite(s): ARCH 3031.

Corequisite(s): ARCH 3031.

ARCH 3332  Digital Media Workshop III  (1)  

Each one-credit course in the digital media workshop series provides intermediate and/or advanced instruction in digital media tools and techniques in coordination with its co-required second or third-year design studio course. Corequisite(s): ARCH 3032.

Corequisite(s): ARCH 3032.

ARCH 3335  Computional Design  (3)  

Prerequisite(s): ARCH 2311.

Prerequisite(s): ARCH 2311.

ARCH 3351  Digital Fabrication  (3)  

Prerequisite(s): ARCH 2311 or ADGM 3100.

Prerequisite(s): ARCH 2311 or ADGM 3100.

ARCH 3360  Cinematic Architecture  (3)  

ARCH 3363  Theories In Digital Media  (3)  

Prerequisite(s): ARCH 2311 or ADGM 3100.

Prerequisite(s): ARCH 2311 or ADGM 3100.

ARCH 3511  Professional Concerns I  (3)  

ARCH 3530  Ethics, Efficacy & Arch  (3)  

ARCH 3620  CONTEXT: Dsgn & Existing Bldgs  (3)  

Prerequisite(s): AHST 1121 or 3010.

Prerequisite(s): AHST 1121 or 3010.

ARCH 3630  Housing and the City  (3)  

Prerequisite(s): ARCH 1121 or AHST 3010.

Prerequisite(s): ARCH 1121 or AHST 3010.

ARCH 3640  Contemporary Swiss Arch  (3)  

Prerequisite(s): ARCH 2122 or AHST 3020.

Prerequisite(s): ARCH 2122 or AHST 3020.

ARCH 3644  Philosophies of Architecture  (3)  

This seminar begins with a consideration of philosophy as a foundation for the development of an architectural theory. After a discussion of some basic concepts and terms we sketch a broad outline of the categories and organization of the discipline of philosophy. We then study the rationalist and empiricist positions in architectural theory, the emergence of Kantian critical philosophy, the shift in emphasis in 20th century philosophy from epistemology to ontology that is characteristic of Existentialism, and the late 20th century attack on traditional epistemology characteristic of poststructuralism. We then discuss the emergence of literary theory as a paradigmatic discipline in the last 30 years as well as the expansion of western philosophy to include aspects of Zen Buddhism, Taoism, and eastern mystical traditions. With this foundation, the course focuses more specifically on theories of architecture and aesthetics and their relationships to various philosophical positions. Prerequisite(s): ARCH 2122 or AHST 3020.

Prerequisite(s): ARCH 2122 or AHST 3020.

ARCH 3731  Urban Geograph & NO Case Study  (3-4)  

ARCH 3742  Design in Public Interest  (3)  

Prerequisite(s): ARCH 1110 or AHST 1110.

Prerequisite(s): ARCH 1110 or AHST 1110.

Corequisite(s): ARCH 3890.

ARCH 3764  NOLA Geography for Architects  (3)  

ARCH 3771  Latin Amer. Urban Experience  (3)  

ARCH 3890  Service Learning  (0-1)  

Students complete a service activity in the community in conjunction with the content of a three-credit co-requisite course. Course may be repeated up to unlimited credit hours.

Corequisite(s): ARCH 3742.


Maximum Hours: 99

ARCH 3940  Transfer Coursework  (0-20)  

Transfer Coursework at the 3000 level. Department approval may be required.


Maximum Hours: 99

ARCH 4041  Advanced Studio Elective  (6)  

Once having completed the core comprehensive design curriculum in the first three years, in the fourth year students are encouraged to engage the city, both locally and globally, by taking one design studio at the Tulane City Center, and a second studio either as part of a semester abroad travel program or as an advanced elective studio. TCC studios, such as URBANbuild, will range in focus from urban design and landscape issues to housing and design-build. These studios, which provide a larger context for architecture, will introduce students to real projects that engage the fabric of the city while emphasizing the importance of professional service and social responsibility. In travel abroad programs (refer to section on International Study) students will have the opportunity to study architecture within foreign environmental contexts, to explore cities and individual buildings as complex cultural artifacts. Advanced elective studios, taught by both fulltime and visiting faculty, offer a range of topics and projects which explore a variety of architectural issues and areas of research. Students choose elective studios that suit their interests, needs and goals, in order to focus their studies while gaining experience within a broader cultural and disciplinary field. This concentration develops areas of expertise beneficial to future professional growth. Prerequisite(s): ARCH 2022.

Prerequisite(s): ARCH 2022.

ARCH 4042  Advanced Studio Elective  (6)  

Once having completed the core comprehensive design curriculum in the first three years, in the fourth year students are encouraged to engage the city, both locally and globally, by taking one design studio at the Tulane City Center, and a second studio either as part of a semester abroad travel program or as an advanced elective studio. TCC studios, such as URBANbuild, will range in focus from urban design and landscape issues to housing and design-build. These studios, which provide a larger context for architecture, will introduce students to real projects that engage the fabric of the city while emphasizing the importance of professional service and social responsibility. In travel abroad programs (refer to section on International Study) students will have the opportunity to study architecture within foreign environmental contexts, to explore cities and individual buildings as complex cultural artifacts. Advanced elective studios, taught by both fulltime and visiting faculty, offer a range of topics and projects which explore a variety of architectural issues and areas of research. Students choose elective studios that suit their interests, needs and goals, in order to focus their studies while gaining experience within a broader cultural and disciplinary field. This concentration develops areas of expertise beneficial to future professional growth. Prerequisite(s): ARCH 2022.

Prerequisite(s): ARCH 2022.

ARCH 4140  Sectional Strategies  (3)  

The seminar explores spatial and social themes that are revealed and explored through the vertical cut of the section. Lectures, readings and student presentations will look at both historic and contemporary projects for buildings, cities and landscapes. Prerequisite(s): ARCH 1110 or AHST 1110.

Prerequisite(s): ARCH 1110 or AHST 1110.

ARCH 4252  Urbanbuild Technology  (3)  

ARCH 4253  Advanced Tech Fabrication  (3)  

ARCH 4335  Computational Design  (3)  

Prerequisite(s): ARCH 2311 or ADGM 3100.

Prerequisite(s): ARCH 2311 or ADGM 3100.

ARCH 4345  The Architecture of Drawing  (3)  

Prerequisite(s): ARCH 1011, DSGN 1100 or ARST 1050.

Prerequisite(s): ARCH 1011, DSGN 1100 or ARST 1050.

ARCH 4347  Spatial Painting  (3)  

Prerequisite(s): ARCH 2327.

Prerequisite(s): ARCH 2327.

ARCH 4352  Advanced Digital Fabrication  (3)  

ARCH 4512  Professional Concerns II  (3)  

ARCH 4550  Career Development Lab  (1)  

ARCH 4552  Urbanbuild Professionalism  (3)  

ARCH 4560  Architecture Internship  (3)  


Maximum Hours: 99

ARCH 4570  Architecture CPS Internship  (3)  

ARCH 4890  Service Learning  (0-1)  

Students complete a service activity in the community in conjunction with the content of a three-credit co-requisite course. Course may be repeated up to unlimited credit hours

Corequisite(s): ARCH 4930.


Maximum Hours: 99

ARCH 4891  Service Learning  (0-1)  

Students complete a service activity in the community in conjunction with the content of a three-credit co-requisite course. Course may be repeated up to unlimited credit hours.


Maximum Hours: 99

ARCH 4892  Service Learning  (0-1)  

Students complete a service activity in the community in conjunction with the content of a three-credit co-requisite course. Course may be repeated up to unlimited credit hours.


Maximum Hours: 99

ARCH 4905  Teaching Practicum  (1-6)  

Teaching courses give upper-level undergraduate and graduate students an opportunity to work with a faculty advisor to work as a teaching assistant for academic credit. Qualified students must develop a syllabus and schedule with the faculty advisor to be approved by the program directors prior to registration. This course may be repeated 2 times for credit.

Course Limit: 2

ARCH 4910  Independent Study  (1-6)  

ARCH 4915  Research Practicum  (1-6)  

Teaching courses give upper-level undergraduate and graduate students an opportunity to work with a faculty advisor to work as a research assistant for academic credit. Qualified students must develop a syllabus and schedule with the faculty advisor to be approved by the program directors prior to registration. This course may be repeated 2 times for credit.

Course Limit: 2

ARCH 4920  Independent Study Abroad  (1-6)  

ARCH 4930  Special Topics  (3,4)  

Special Topics in Architecture. Course may be repeated unlimited times for credit.

Corequisite(s): ARCH 4890.

Course Limit: 99

ARCH 4931  Special Topics  (3)  

Special Topics in Architecture. Course may be repeated unlimited times for credit.

Course Limit: 99

ARCH 4932  Special Topics  (3)  

Special Topics in Architecture. Course may be repeated unlimited times for credit.

Course Limit: 99

ARCH 4933  Special Topics  (3)  

Special Topics in Architecture. Course may be repeated unlimited times for credit.

Course Limit: 99

ARCH 4934  Special Topics  (3)  

Special Topics in Architecture. Course may be repeated unlimited times for credit.

Course Limit: 99

ARCH 4935  Special Topics  (3)  

Special Topics in Architecture. Course may be repeated unlimited times for credit.

Course Limit: 99

ARCH 4936  Special Topics  (3)  

Special Topics in Architecture. Course may be repeated unlimited times for credit.

Course Limit: 99

ARCH 4937  Special Topics  (3)  

Special Topics in Architecture. Course may be repeated unlimited times for credit.

Course Limit: 99

ARCH 4938  Special Topics  (3)  

Special Topics in Architecture. Course may be repeated unlimited times for credit.

Course Limit: 99

ARCH 4939  Special Topics  (3)  

Special Topics in Architecture. Course may be repeated unlimited times for credit. Prerequisite(s): ARCH 2122 or AHST 3020.

Prerequisite(s): ARCH 2122 or AHST 3020.

Course Limit: 99

ARCH 4940  Transfer Coursework  (0-20)  

Transfer coursework at the 4000 level. Departmental approval required.


Maximum Hours: 99

ARCH 4950  Special Topics  (3)  

Special Topics in Architecture.


Maximum Hours: 6

ARCH 5051  Advanced Studio Elective  (6)  

Advanced level graduate studio design courses, characterized by architectural problems of varying scale and complexity, require solutions that are thorough in their conception, development, and execution. Approximately 4-8 studio sections are offered each semester, each with a unique focus as determined by individual faculty teaching these studios. These various sections offer a range of topics and projects which explore a variety of architectural issues and areas of research. Examples include: aesthetic, cultural, and symbolic issues, housing, community design, urban design, historic preservation, and design/build. Students choose elective studios that suit their interests, needs, and goals, in order to focus their studies while gaining experience within a broader cultural and disciplinary field. This concentration develops areas of expertise beneficial to future professional growth. Prerequisite(s): ARCH 4041 or 4042.

Prerequisite(s): ARCH 4041 or 4042.

ARCH 5380  Junior Year Abroad  (1-20)  

Semester Abroad. Course may be repeated up to unlimited credit hours.


Maximum Hours: 99

ARCH 5390  Junior Year Abroad  (1-20)  

Semester Abroad. Course may be repeated up to unlimited credit hours.


Maximum Hours: 99

ARCH 5580  Architecture Preceptorship  (6)  


Maximum Hours: 12

ARCH 5891  Service Learning  (0-1)  

Students complete a service activity in the community in conjunction with the content of a three-credit co-requisite course. Course may be repeated up to unlimited credit hours.


Maximum Hours: 99

ARCH 5940  Transfer Coursework  (0-20)  

Transfer coursework at the 5000 level. Departmental approval required.


Maximum Hours: 99

ARCH 5980  Thesis Preparation  (3)  

Thesis Research.

ARCH 5990  Thesis Studio  (6)  

The final degree project is the culmination of the architectural design curriculum and the capstone project for architecture students. Students undertake one of three streams for their final research and design project: Thesis Studio, Research Studio or an Advanced Integrated Studio. Students who elect to do an independent Thesis Studio must fulfill specific academic requirements (see section on policy), have prepared a thesis proposal by the beginning of the fall semester, and have approval for this proposal by the thesis directors. Independent Research Theses may also be undertaken by those students who have a demonstrated record of academic excellence (with a cumulative and design grade point average of 3.6-4.0), and have prepared a research proposal approved in advance both by a faculty sponsor and the thesis directors. Each of the curricular streams for the Master of Architecture Thesis will consist of DSGN 5100: Thesis Research + Analysis and DSGN 5200: Thesis Design Studio. Prerequisite(s): ARCH 5980.

Prerequisite(s): ARCH 5980.

ARCH 6011  Architecture Studio  (6)  

ARCH 6012  Architecture Studio  (6)  

ARCH 6015  Architecture Studio  (1)  

This studio is intended for students in the advanced standing M. Arch I track. Working alongside students entering the MArch I regular track, students will expand on the tools, skills, and concepts acquired in their previous design experience, through digital drawing, 3-D modeling, and making. The goal is to instill students with the ability to navigate the digital and the physical realm fluidly by focusing on efficient digital work-flows and processes. The studio will be structured through a series of prescribed exercises assisted by assigned readings, slide presentations, and skill instructions. Students will gain the ability to digitally model and extract 2D orthographic drawings as well as 3D print or laser-cut and assemble physical models.

ARCH 6021  Architecture Studio  (6)  

ARCH 6022  Architecture Studio  (6)  

ARCH 6032  Architecture Studio  (6)  

ARCH 6041  Advanced Studio Elective  (6)  

Advanced level graduate studio design courses, characterized by architectural problems of varying scale and complexity, require solutions that are thorough in their conception, development, and execution. Approximately 4-8 studio sections are offered each semester, each with a unique focus as determined by individual faculty teaching these studios. These various sections offer a range of topics and projects which explore a variety of architectural issues and areas of research. Examples include: aesthetic, cultural, and symbolic issues, housing, community design, urban design, historic preservation, and design/build. Students choose elective studios that suit their interests, needs, and goals, in order to focus their studies while gaining experience within a broader cultural and disciplinary field. This concentration develops areas of expertise beneficial to future professional growth.

ARCH 6042  Advanced Studio Elective  (6)  

Advanced level graduate studio design courses, characterized by architectural problems of varying scale and complexity, require solutions that are thorough in their conception, development, and execution. Approximately 4-8 studio sections are offered each semester, each with a unique focus as determined by individual faculty teaching these studios. These various sections offer a range of topics and projects which explore a variety of architectural issues and areas of research. Examples include: aesthetic, cultural, and symbolic issues, housing, community design, urban design, historic preservation, and design/build. Students choose elective studios that suit their interests, needs, and goals, in order to focus their studies while gaining experience within a broader cultural and disciplinary field. This concentration develops areas of expertise beneficial to future professional growth.

ARCH 6051  Advanced Studio Elective  (6)  

Advanced level graduate studio design courses, characterized by architectural problems of varying scale and complexity, require solutions that are thorough in their conception, development, and execution. Approximately 4-8 studio sections are offered each semester, each with a unique focus as determined by individual faculty teaching these studios. These various sections offer a range of topics and projects which explore a variety of architectural issues and areas of research. Examples include: aesthetic, cultural, and symbolic issues, housing, community design, urban design, historic preservation, and design/build. Students choose elective studios that suit their interests, needs, and goals, in order to focus their studies while gaining experience within a broader cultural and disciplinary field. This concentration develops areas of expertise beneficial to future professional growth.

ARCH 6052  Advanced Studio Elective  (6)  

Advanced level graduate studio design courses, characterized by architectural problems of varying scale and complexity, require solutions that are thorough in their conception, development, and execution. Approximately 4-8 studio sections are offered each semester, each with a unique focus as determined by individual faculty teaching these studios. These various sections offer a range of topics and projects which explore a variety of architectural issues and areas of research. Examples include: aesthetic, cultural, and symbolic issues, housing, community design, urban design, historic preservation, and design/build. Students choose elective studios that suit their interests, needs, and goals, in order to focus their studies while gaining experience within a broader cultural and disciplinary field. This concentration develops areas of expertise beneficial to future professional growth.

ARCH 6110  Intro to Architecture  (3)  

ARCH 6111  Topics in Architecture History/Theory  (1.5)  

This is one of four required half-semester courses introducing students to architectural history and theory by exposing them to a broad range of architectural origins, buildings examples and influences. The goal of the architecture history and theory course sequence is to prepare students to become accomplished researchers—well able to connect a useful taxonomy of architectural examples to contemporary issues and ambitions. Each of the courses begins with a contemporary figure in architectural practice and proceeds in a reverse chronology to explore the precedents and linages of thought that have been synthesized in the work of that contemporary practice. Teaching by example, these courses will offer a lesson in how distant antecedents support and continue to inform the discipline today. By exploring both a western and a non-western canon from a broader range of voices and vantage points, students will learn to further contextualize the basic architectural vocabulary acquired in their introductory courses. Corequisite(s): ARCH 6112.

Corequisite(s): ARCH 6112.

ARCH 6112  Topics in Architecture History/Theory  (1.5)  

This is one of four required half-semester courses introducing students to architectural history and theory by exposing them to a broad range of architectural origins, buildings examples and influences. The goal of the architecture history and theory course sequence is to prepare students to become accomplished researchers—well able to connect a useful taxonomy of architectural examples to contemporary issues and ambitions. Each of the courses begins with a contemporary figure in architectural practice and proceeds in a reverse chronology to explore the precedents and linages of thought that have been synthesized in the work of that contemporary practice. Teaching by example, these courses will offer a lesson in how distant antecedents support and continue to inform the discipline today. By exploring both a western and a non-western canon from a broader range of voices and vantage points, students will learn to further contextualize the basic architectural vocabulary acquired in their introductory courses. Corequisite(s): ARCH 6111.

Corequisite(s): ARCH 6111.

ARCH 6113  Topics in Architecture History/Theory  (1.5)  

This is one of four required half-semester courses introducing students to architectural history and theory by exposing them to a broad range of architectural origins, buildings examples and influences. The goal of the architecture history and theory course sequence is to prepare students to become accomplished researchers—well able to connect a useful taxonomy of architectural examples to contemporary issues and ambitions. Each of the courses begins with a contemporary figure in architectural practice and proceeds in a reverse chronology to explore the precedents and linages of thought that have been synthesized in the work of that contemporary practice. Teaching by example, these courses will offer a lesson in how distant antecedents support and continue to inform the discipline today. By exploring both a western and a non-western canon from a broader range of voices and vantage points, students will learn to further contextualize the basic architectural vocabulary acquired in their introductory courses. Corequisite(s): ARCH 6114.

Corequisite(s): ARCH 6114.

ARCH 6114  Topics in Architecture History/Theory  (1.5)  

This is one of four required half-semester courses introducing students to architectural history and theory by exposing them to a broad range of architectural origins, buildings examples and influences. The goal of the architecture history and theory course sequence is to prepare students to become accomplished researchers—well able to connect a useful taxonomy of architectural examples to contemporary issues and ambitions. Each of the courses begins with a contemporary figure in architectural practice and proceeds in a reverse chronology to explore the precedents and linages of thought that have been synthesized in the work of that contemporary practice. Teaching by example, these courses will offer a lesson in how distant antecedents support and continue to inform the discipline today. By exploring both a western and a non-western canon from a broader range of voices and vantage points, students will learn to further contextualize the basic architectural vocabulary acquired in their introductory courses. Corequisite(s): ARCH 6113.

Corequisite(s): ARCH 6113.

ARCH 6121  History and Theory of Architecture and Urbanism I  (3)  

Discover the foundation and evolution of architectural tradition in this survey course, starting with prehistoric developments in Europe and continuing through the medieval period. This course is global in focus, including both Western and non-Western developments. The survey highlights a variety of aspects of the built environment such as architecture, urban settlements and landscapes. Coursework investigates monumental civic architecture, religious structures, as well as domestic buildings, the urban form, and architectural theory.

ARCH 6122  History and Theory of Architecture and Urbanism II  (3)  

The course covers the period from the Enlightenment through the early-Modern and high-Modern periods. While the course will emphasize the late-eighteenth (Enlightenment) creation of canonical pedagogies and strategies as foundational texts, it will also include nineteenth-century urbanism and landscapes, both of which condition the formation of material culture in the early- and mid-twentieth centuries. The course is written expressly for students of architecture; we will concentrate not only on the identification and formation of urban artifacts, buildings, architects, and movements, but also on the social, political, and historical context surrounding their genesis and development. The course material is presented according to successive themes, thereby facilitating not only an emphasis on the artifacts and their context, but also on the discourse that supports architecture as a discipline. These themes provide insight into the various motivations and ideas, upon which the history of Modern Architecture rests. In presenting the material in this manner, it is hoped that students will understand that history--in particular the history embedded in the material of architecture--indeed resonates through time, becoming relevant and vital to the genesis and formation of current and future architectural discourse.

ARCH 6130  Architectural Research Methods  (3)  

This course introduces students to various research paradigms to engage and produce architectural scholarship. Architectural Research Methods will include weekly readings and written responses, a literature review of relevant texts, and a proposal for a research topic. Students will develop skills necessary to support their work in research-based Options Studios and other courses with expectations for scholarly outcomes.

ARCH 6140  Sectional Strategies  (3)  

The seminar explores spatial and social themes that are revealed and explored through the vertical cut of the section. Lectures, readings and student presentations will look at both historic and contemporary projects for buildings, cities and landscapes.

ARCH 6144  Philosophies of Architecture  (3)  

This seminar begins with a consideration of philosophy as a foundation for the development of an architectural theory. After a discussion of some basic concepts and terms we sketch a broad outline of the categories and organization of the discipline of philosophy. We then study the rationalist and empiricist positions in architectural theory, the emergence of Kantian critical philosophy, the shift in emphasis in 20th century philosophy from epistemology to ontology that is characteristic of Existentialism, and the late 20th century attack on traditional epistemology characteristic of poststructuralism. We then discuss the emergence of literary theory as a paradigmatic discipline in the last 30 years as well as the expansion of western philosophy to include aspects of Zen Buddhism, Taoism, and eastern mystical traditions. With this foundation, the course focuses more specifically on theories of architecture and aesthetics and their relationships to various philosophical positions.

ARCH 6211  Site Strategies  (3)  

ARCH 6212  Materials and Methods  (3)  

ARCH 6213  Building, Climate, Comfort  (4)  

Corequisite(s): ARCH 6223.

Corequisite(s): ARCH 6223.

ARCH 6214  Structural Systems  (4)  

ARCH 6215  Integrated Building Systems  (4)  

ARCH 6223  Building, Climate, Comfort Lab  (0)  

Corequisite(s): ARCH 6213.

Corequisite(s): ARCH 6213.

ARCH 6239  Space Arch/Walking Cities/Fut.  (3)  

ARCH 6252  Urbanbuild Technology  (3)  

ARCH 6253  Advanced Tech Fabrication  (3)  

ARCH 6311  Digital Media  (3)  

ARCH 6312  Advanced Digital Media  (3)  

The second course of the digital media sequence covers advance techniques for digital drawing, modeling, and image production. Students will continue to explore techniques for orthographic, axonometric, and perspective projection drawing. Advanced topics will include representation techniques such as texture mapping, rendering (raytracing, global illumination, high dynamic range images, etc.), animation, procedural modeling, and parametric modeling. Software covered in the course will include Rhino, Grasshopper, V-Ray, and 3DS Max.

ARCH 6322  Digital Media Workshop I  (1)  

Each one-credit course in the digital media workshop series provides intermediate and/or advanced instruction in digital media tools and techniques in coordination with its co-required second or third-year architectural design studio course. Corequisite(s): ARCH 6022.

Corequisite(s): ARCH 6022.

ARCH 6327  Intro to Spatial Painting  (3)  

ARCH 6331  Digital Media Workshop II  (1)  

Each one-credit course in the digital media workshop series provides intermediate and/or advanced instruction in digital media tools and techniques in coordination with its co-required second or third-year architectural design studio course. Corequisite(s): ARCH 6031.

Corequisite(s): ARCH 6031.

ARCH 6332  Digital Media Workshop III  (1)  

Each one-credit course in the digital media workshop series provides intermediate and/or advanced instruction in digital media tools and techniques in coordination with its co-required second or third-year design studio course. Corequisite(s): ARCH 6032.

Corequisite(s): ARCH 6032.

ARCH 6335  Computational Design  (3)  

ARCH 6341  Drawing and Analysis  (3)  

ARCH 6345  The Architecture of Drawing  (3)  

ARCH 6347  Spatial Painting  (3)  

Prerequisite(s): ARCH 6327.

Prerequisite(s): ARCH 6327.

ARCH 6351  Digital Fabrication  (3)  

ARCH 6352  Advanced Digital Fabrication  (3)  

ARCH 6360  Cinematic Architecture  (3)  

ARCH 6363  Theories In Digital Media  (3)  

ARCH 6511  Professional Concerns I  (3)  

ARCH 6512  Professional Concerns II  (3)  

ARCH 6530  Ethics, Efficacy & Arch  (3)  

ARCH 6550  Career Development Lab  (1)  

ARCH 6552  Urbanbuild Professionalism  (3)  

ARCH 6560  Architecture Internship  (3)  

ARCH 6580  Architecture Preceptorship  (6)  


Maximum Hours: 12

ARCH 6620  CONTEXT: Dsgn & Existing Bldgs  (3)  

ARCH 6630  Housing and the City  (3)  

Prerequisite(s): ARCH 6121 or AHST 6610.

Prerequisite(s): ARCH 6121 or AHST 6610.

ARCH 6640  Contemporary Swiss Arch  (3)  

ARCH 6731  Urban Geograph & NO Case Study  (3)  

ARCH 6742  Design in Public Interest  (3)  

ARCH 6764  NOLA Geography for Architects  (3)  

ARCH 6771  Urban Planing in Latin America  (3)  

A study of the development of the major cities of Latin America and particularly on the role that architecture and urbanism played in creating images of colonial power and, later, urban modernity. Emphasizes selected Latin American cities that have experienced significant immigration after 1880 and in which questions of cultural identity have loomed large: Havana, Mexico City, Montevideo, Santiago de Chile, Lima, San Paulo, Rio de Janeiro, and Buenos Aires.

ARCH 6905  Teaching Practicum  (1-6)  

Teaching courses give upper-level undergraduate and graduate students an opportunity to work with a faculty advisor to work as a teaching assistant for academic credit. Qualified students must develop a syllabus and schedule with the faculty advisor to be approved by the program directors prior to registration. This course may be repeated 2 times for credit.

Course Limit: 2

ARCH 6910  Independent Study  (1-6)  

ARCH 6915  Research Practicum  (1-6)  

Teaching courses give upper-level undergraduate and graduate students an opportunity to work with a faculty advisor to work as a research assistant for academic credit. Qualified students must develop a syllabus and schedule with the faculty advisor to be approved by the program directors prior to registration. This course may be repeated 2 times for credit.

Course Limit: 2

ARCH 6920  Independent Study Abroad  (1-6)  

ARCH 6925  Independent Thesis Research  (3)  

Students will conduct supervised research in support of their project in the Thesis Studio course. Course may be repeated up to unlimited credit hours.


Maximum Hours: 99

ARCH 6930  Special Topics  (3)  

Special Topics in Architecture. Course may be repeated unlimited times for credit.

Course Limit: 99

ARCH 6931  Special Topics  (3)  

Special Topics in Architecture. Course may be repeated unlimited times for credit.

Course Limit: 99

ARCH 6932  Special Topics  (3)  

Special Topics in Architecture. Course may be repeated unlimited times for credit.

Course Limit: 99

ARCH 6933  Special Topics  (3)  

Special Topics in Architecture. Course may be repeated unlimited times for credit.

Course Limit: 99

ARCH 6934  Special Topics  (3)  

Special Topics in Architecture. Course may be repeated unlimited times for credit.

Course Limit: 99

ARCH 6935  Special Topics  (3)  

Special Topics in Architecture. Course may be repeated unlimited times for credit.

Course Limit: 99

ARCH 6936  Special Topics  (3)  

Special Topics in Architecture. Course may be repeated unlimited times for credit.

Course Limit: 99

ARCH 6937  Special Topics  (3)  

Special Topics in Architecture. Course may be repeated unlimited times for credit.

Course Limit: 99

ARCH 6938  Special Topics  (3)  

Special Topics in Architecture. Course may be repeated unlimited times for credit.

Course Limit: 99

ARCH 6939  Special Topics  (3)  

Special Topics in Architecture. Course may be repeated unlimited times for credit.

Course Limit: 99

ARCH 6940  Transfer Coursework  (0-20)  

Transfer coursework at the 6000 level. Departmental approval required.


Maximum Hours: 99

ARCH 6950  Special Topics  (3)  

Special Topics in Architecture. Course may be repeated 2 times for credit.

Course Limit: 2

ARCH 6980  Thesis Research  (3)  

Thesis Research.

ARCH 6990  Thesis Studio  (6)  

The final degree project is the culmination of the architectural design curriculum and the capstone project for architecture students. Students undertake one of three streams for their final research and design project: Thesis Studio, Research Studio or an Advanced Integrated Studio. Students who elect to do an independent Thesis Studio must fulfill specific academic requirements (see section on policy), have prepared a thesis proposal by the beginning of the fall semester, and have approval for this proposal by the thesis directors. Independent Research Theses may also be undertaken by those students who have a demonstrated record of academic excellence (with a cumulative and design grade point average of 3.6-4.0), and have prepared a research proposal approved in advance both by a faculty sponsor and the thesis directors. Each of the curricular streams for the Master of Architecture Thesis will consist of DSGN 5100: Thesis Research + Analysis and DSGN 5200: Thesis Design Studio.