Homeland Security (HMLS)

Homeland Security (HMLS)

HMLS 1940  Transfer Credit  (3)  

Transfer credit. Course may be repeated up to unlimited credit hours.


Maximum Hours: 99

HMLS 2750  Homeland Security Challenge  (3)  

The evolution of homeland security as a concept, and a legal framework, a redirection of national policies and priorities is described. The political, economic, and practical issues of implementation are examined. An overview of the history of the terrorist threat and U.S. responses and an introduction to fundamental policy legislation and documents, such as national security strategies, homeland security decision directives, the National Response Plan, and National Incident Management System is provided. The Department of Homeland Security model of planning, protecting, responding, and recovering from a natural disaster and terrorist attacks is described.

HMLS 2940  Transfer Credit  (4)  

Transfer credit. Course may be repeated up to unlimited credit hours.


Maximum Hours: 99

HMLS 3150  Health and Medical Issues  (3)  

A study of the important health and medical management issues involved in crises and emergencies presented for the non-medical emergency manager. The wide range of medical and health issues inherent to crisis including biological, radiological, nuclear events and emergencies are described. Methods for integrating medical, public health, and psychological processes into emergency management programs are discussed. 

HMLS 3200  Domestic & Intl Terrorism  (3)  

This course introduces participants to various aspects of domestic and international terrorist organizations. The student will be introduced to basic principles of terrorist investigations, international and domestic security threats, and the goals, motivational factors, targets, and tactics of terrorist organizations. The student will learn techniques for evaluating an organization's vulnerability to attacks that involve chemical, biological, explosive, radioactive weapons or sabotage. Students will learn the current models, roles, and responsibilities of local, state, and federal agencies in counter-terrorism investigations. 

HMLS 3250  Emergency Management  (3)  

This course will examine core elements of emergency management in the context of the science, law, medicine, and economics that confront 21st Century leaders in business and government. Case studies, including that of Hurricane Katrina, will serve as the focus for readings, class discussion and policy research to improve this vital function of government. Key consideration will be given to asymmetrical problems presented to emergency managers, the established authorities and programs, their effectiveness and how to improve them. 

HMLS 3500  Intellignce Rsrch &Anlys  (3)  

This course is designed to give students an understanding of the history and fundamental concepts of intelligence-gathering and analysis. In addition to tracing the development of intelligence organizations, it examines both the disciplines of intelligence (signals intelligence and espionage, for example) and its products. It focuses on the effects intelligence exercises on decision making, particularly, but not exclusively, in the realm of national security and military policy. It uses case studies to illustrate enduring issues or problems in the study of intelligence. 

HMLS 3550  Human Intel & Counter Intel  (3)  

This course will examine the history of HUMINT and CI within the United States Intelligence Community (USIC) as well as the HUMINT and CI activities of key allies and adversaries. The course will be divided into thirds. The first portion will focus on the structure and functions of intelligence apparatuses throughout the world. In the second portion students will take an in-depth examination of numerous important case studies of successful HUMINT and CI operations. In the final section students will participate in a mock intelligence operation and class discussions regarding the ethics and future of human-based espionage.

HMLS 3555  History & Role of Intel Comm  (3)  

This course will focus on key periods in the development of the modern US intelligence community, (1) Revolution to World War One, (2) World War Two, (3) the post World War Two reorganization, (4) the post-Cold War Period, and (5) post 9/11 reforms. Additionally, the different intelligence disciplines and major intelligence agencies will be examined.

HMLS 3600  Critical Infrastructure  (3)  

This course introduces participants to the Critical Infrastructure Protection (CIP) process to secure the effective protection of the people, physical entities, and critical information systems. This course will introduce a time-efficient and resource-restrained practice that ensures the protection of only those infrastructures upon which survivability, continuity of operations, and mission success depend. The CIP course will guide leaders in the theories of physical protection and conducting vulnerability assessments of critical infrastructures. This course will also introduce the critical sectors currently identified by the United States Department of Homeland Security and how disruption of these sectors affects civilians and the economy. 

HMLS 3700  Transport & Border Secur  (3)  

This course provides a student with an analysis of issues that concern the protection of the borders of the United States and U.S. policies regarding the safety of the U.S. transportation system. The course analyses the changes in security arrangements from pre to post 9-11 policies, relative to border and transportation security, with a synthesis of the impact of the formation of the U.S. Department of Homeland Security and on the issues concerning internal CONUS security relative to these two security concerns. 

HMLS 3910  Special Topics  (1-3)  

Special Topics in Homeland Security Studies. Course may be repeated unlimited times for credit.

Course Limit: 99

HMLS 3911  Special Topics  (1-3)  

Special Topics in Homeland Security Studies. Course may be repeated unlimited times for credit.

Course Limit: 99

HMLS 3920  Emergency Planning & Exercises  (3)  

HMLS 3930  Sports Security Management  (3)  

This course provides an overview of security planning, risk assessment methodologies, and emergency response considerations for sport and special events. Students will learn how to identify threats and vulnerabilities, analyze and mitigate risk, and harden events and venues through security countermeasure proposals and emergency response/recovery initiatives.

HMLS 4500  Intelligence Analysis  (3)  

This course presents an in-depth analysis of the methods used by terrorist organizations to finance global operations and the investigative techniques used to counter such measures. The means used by terrorist organizations to generate, transfer, and spend terrorist funding will be analyzed. It will also include research of public source, information sharing, and other information that can be used to connect the dots."" During the computer lab portion to this course Prerequisite(s): HMLS 3500.

Prerequisite(s): HMLS 3500.

HMLS 4560  Internship  (1-3)  

Course may be repeated up to unlimited credit hours.


Maximum Hours: 99

HMLS 4600  Counter-Terrorism  (3)  

This course will examine key policy issues and balances that must be addressed in strategic counterterrorism planning, particularly in the use of applied technology within the context of civil jurisdiction and rule of law. The course will examine terrorist threats to the homeland and how these threats can be met by the application of science and technology. Policy issues that address the balance between security and civil liberties that must be resolved to effectively counter terrorism will be discussed. These issues will be addressed from the governance perspective of a liberal democracy. Strategic planning principles that integrate capabilities of current and future applied technology and the key legal and policy issues that must be resolved in order to make effective use of information as balanced against civil liberties will be explored as well.  Prerequisite(s): HMLS 3200.

Prerequisite(s): HMLS 3200.

HMLS 4700  Maritime & Border Security  (3)  

This course will examine the role of maritime security in terms of protecting the homeland of the United States and other countries who are members of the International Maritime Organization (IMO). The primary focus will be on the ISPS Code and the Maritime Transportation Security Act.  Prerequisite(s): HMLS 3700.

Prerequisite(s): HMLS 3700.

HMLS 4910  Independent Study  (1-3)  

Independent study in Homeland Security Studies.

HMLS 4920  Independent Study  (1-3)  

Independent study in Homeland Security Studies.

HMLS 4990  Practicum  (3)  

The Practicum may include job-related field projects, integrative analyses of professional literature and published research, original research, original research projects, and comprehensive project proposals for adoption by third parties. In all cases, the Practicum is intended to demonstrate an extensive understanding of the topic area selected, the ability to develop an integrative and systemic analysis of a problem, and the ability to identify appropriate solutions and recommendations.  A written report documenting all aspects of the project will be presented for faculty approval. This course is only open to Post-Baccalaureate Certificate students and should be taken in the final year of study.

HMLS 6150  Intro to Emergency Management  (3)  

This course will be an advanced examination of modern emergency management concepts, trends nationally and internationally, practical and political issues and policies, technological applications to emergency management, and the development and practical implementation of sound emergency management practices designed to protect people, communities, critical infrastructure and key assets. Included will be a brief review of emergency management policy and procedures in the United States and other countries, legal issues, social science perspectives, planning concepts and techniques, disaster modeling, operational problems, analytical methods, special populations, and management styles. Additionally, case studies will be examined to determine the extent of effective or ineffective planning, responding, and recovering from natural and technological disasters.

HMLS 6200  Critical Infrastr. Protection  (3)  

This course closely examines the Critical Infrastructure Protection process to secure the effective protection of people, physical entities, and critical information and support systems in the event of natural disasters, and accidental or intentional man-made incidents of major destruction. The course will provide an analysis of a time-efficient and resource-restrained practice that ensures the protection of those critical infrastructures upon which survivability, continuity of operations, and mission success depend. The course will guide students in the theories of physical protection and conducting vulnerability assessments of critical infrastructure elements. We will examine the critical sectors identified by the United States Department of Homeland Security and how disruption of these sectors could effect the civil population and the national economy.

HMLS 6250  Health & Med Issues Emer Mgmt  (3)  

An advanced study of the important health and medical management issues involved in crises and emergencies presented for the non-medical emergency manager. The wide range of medical and health issues inherent to a crisis including biological, radiological, nuclear events and emergencies are described. Students will focus on innovative response and recovery including long term public health recovery issues methods for integrating medical, public health, and psychological processes into emergency management. Prerequisite(s): HMLS 6150.

Prerequisite(s): HMLS 6150.

HMLS 6300  Geospatial Information Systems  (3)  

Applied Geographic Information Systems (GIS) is designed to provide students with a solid foundation in both GIS concepts and the use of GIS. Applied Geographic Information Systems strikes a careful balance between GIS concepts and hands-on applications. GIS is an emergent technological domain utilized by all U.S. Federal Departments and Agencies and many private sector organizations for defense and national security (including intelligence), transportation and logistics, and telecommunications practical application and analysis. GIS allows you to use satellite imagery to conduct geospatial analysis by using data to build maps and graphs. This course is an introductory geospatial intelligence analysis course that will provide the learner with basic technological and industry-relevant skills (no technical background required). The learner will utilize industry software to develop maps and map layers to address multiple real-world practical case studies.

HMLS 6400  Military/Civilian Response  (3)  

This course is designed to give the students a broad overview of the National Preparedness Guidelines, National Planning Scenarios, and the National Incident Management System as it relates to Defense Support of Civil Authorities in the instances of key risks such as; Natural Hazards, Pandemics, Technological and Accidental Hazards, Terrorist acts, and Cyber Attacks. This course will further educate students on what kind of support the Department of Defense (DoD) can provide civilian authorities, the legality of such support, as well as explain the authorities, appropriateness and extent of DoD support.

HMLS 6450  Border Security  (3)  

This course is designed to enhance the student’s ability to think critically about border security and our nation’s approach to securing its borders. It will equip the student with the necessary knowledge to effectively evaluate current border security strategies as well as propose policy changes related to border security in order to enhance the nation’s homeland security posture.

HMLS 6500  Intel Analysis Critical Think  (3)  

This course is designed to give students an advanced understanding of intelligence-gathering and analysis as it relates to critical thinking; linkages to money laundering, risk management, risk assessment factors, operational concepts and strategic implications. It is a logical follow-on study that further examines the collaborative process of intelligence analysis and will provide homeland security professionals tools, framework and concepts to further develop their leadership skills by understanding how the synthesis and utilization of intelligence impacts decision making in tactical, operational and strategic settings while emphasizing the principles of holistic, all-hazards approach to preparedness.

HMLS 6600  Approaches Counter-Terrorism  (3)  

Students will employ critical analysis to examine key policy issues and balances that must be addressed in strategic counterterrorism planning, particularly in the use of applied technology within the context of civil jurisdiction and rule of law. The course will examine terrorist threats to the homeland and how these threats can be met by the application of science and technology. Policy issues that address the balance between security and civil liberties that must be resolved to effectively counter terrorism will be discussed. These issues will be addressed from the governance perspective of a liberal democracy. Strategic planning principles that integrate capabilities of current and future applied technology and the key legal and policy issues that must be resolved in order to make effective use of information as balanced against civil liberties will be explored as well.

HMLS 7100  Narco-Terrorism  (3)  

This course will expose the narcotics nexus to terrorist organizations and how they affect the United States and foreign terrorist organizations threatening within our borders. A recommended proactive approach to terrorism investigations in all communities will be illustrated with an emphasis on drug-related issues. These tactics can be carried out by any law enforcement officer and will be successful in the fight against terrorism affecting the United States on the mainland. Foreign terrorist organizations such as Al Qaeda, Hamas, Hezbollah, ARC, domestic terrorist organizations, and localized (U.S) narco-terrorists will be discussed. Identifying and investigating terrorist cells in the United States is the main focus of this course. Every type of U.S. law enforcement officer will be shown how to use these methods to fight against terrorism within our borders.

HMLS 7200  Domestic & Intl Terrorism  (3)  

The course will provide insight and analysis into the ideology, structure, financing, and driving forces behind terrorist individuals and groups inside the United States (homegrown) and international (foreign) groups. The course will offer a critical analysis of the governmental response to the war on terrorism, including contemporary models of counterterrorism. Students will also explore the published works of leading thinkers regarding the concept of terrorism and will discuss and analyze the goals, motivational factors, targets, and tactics of terrorist organizations regardless of ideology. Additionally, students will learn techniques for evaluating vulnerability to all forms of attack, as well as the threat terrorism poses to modern society, while staying abreast of the current roles, and responsibilities of all levels of government agencies in countering terrorism.

HMLS 7300  Maritime & Border Security  (3)  

This course will examine key policy issues and balances that must be addressed in all aspects of Maritime Homeland Security. The current paradigm of security on the world’s waterways and in the ports of the United States is one of overlapping layers of security. Each layer is specific to a particular port, commodity, state government, governmental agency, maritime classification society, and other maritime agencies, shipping routes, intermodal transportation nodes and shipping methods and end user requirements. It is this intricate and overlapping series of security measures that provides protection and security within the maritime transportation infrastructure against a wide variety of threats.

HMLS 7400  Business Continuity  (3)  

HMLS 7450  Public/Private Partnership  (3)  

As communities prepare and respond to events that are more extreme, complex and frequent, it is clear that all resources have to be utilized to ensure resilience. The development of public and private partnerships provides resources in many forms to address these needs. In this course, students gain knowledge of the importance of these partnerships in the planning process. They will learn approaches to team and partnership building utilizing gap analysis to bring these partnerships together. They will incorporate and apply the elements of communication and information sharing, leadership and social responsibility through case studies. Finally, they will describe employment of systems analysis to evaluate partnerships.

HMLS 7500  Intelligence Research  (3)  

This course presents students with an analysis of how intelligence is collected and processed and how the resulting estimates contribute to the formation of national policy and homeland security. This course examines the collaborative process of intelligence analysis and is designed to provide students the tools, framework and concepts required to develop leadership skills through understanding how the synthesis and utilization of intelligence impacts decision making in tactical, operational and strategic settings within the framework of the principles of all hazards preparedness. Students will gain an understanding of the history and fundamental concepts of intelligence-gathering and analysis. In addition to tracing the development of intelligence organizations, it examines both the disciplines of intelligence (signals intelligence and espionage, for example) and its products. Case studies will be employed to illustrate enduring issues or problems in the study of intelligence.

HMLS 7501  Independent Study  (1-3)  

Independent study in Homeland Security Studies.

HMLS 7525  Hum Intel/Counter Intel  (3)  

A course that explores the world of espionage, its importance in world history, the psychology behind the recruitment of human sources, the nature of clandestine operations, and the principals involved in counterintelligence. The course includes a wide range of historical case studies and an examination of the potential future role of espionage in an increasingly unstable and dangerous world.

Prerequisite(s): HMLS 7500.

HMLS 7550  Info Ops/Intel  (3)  

This course explores Information Operations and the increasing role it plays in military, political, and international affairs. It provides a detailed understanding of the history, tools, and methods employed by U.S. and its adversaries to influence the thinking of target audiences, including the role cyber plays in enabling its transmission and feedback. The course examines these operations from the military, civilian, business, and internet paradigms, as well as the continuous information collection of individuals by governments and corporations. Additionally, this course will provide an understanding of Information Operations at all levels of implementation, including strategic communication and public diplomacy. The course also provides students an understanding of the importance of and how to analyze Open-Source Intelligence (OSINT). Students will apply their knowledge of Information Operations to the analysis of open-source materials to better prepare them to develop assessments of the validity, perspective, and accuracy of such reports.

Prerequisite(s): HMLS 6500.

HMLS 7601  Special Topic  (3)  

Special Topics in Homeland Security Studies.

HMLS 7602  Special Topic  (3)  

Special Topics in Homeland Security Studies.

HMLS 7650  Defense Support to Civil Auth  (3)  

It is vital for emergency managers at every jurisdictional level to possess a rudimentary understanding (at a minimum) of military resources; their capabilities and limitations; and, how to access and integrate them in their respective jurisdiction’s disaster response and recovery operations. Without this understanding, there are significant risks of missed opportunities to save lives mitigate human suffering, and mitigate significant property and/or environmental damage.

HMLS 7700  Transportatn & Border Security  (3)  

This course closely examines the complexities of protecting the borders of the United States and ensuring the safety and security of the U.S. transportation system, including intermodal connections. Fundamentally, the course considers the relationship between security and the need to maintain supply chain flow and how certain strategic approaches can buy down risk. The course also analyzes the changes in security arrangements from pre- to post-9/11 policies, relative to border and transportation security, with a synthesis of the organization of the U.S. Department of Homeland Security and national policy processes. In so doing, the course assesses the adequacies of extant national strategies and implementing plans that address the spectrum of policies involving protection, detection, deterrence, defense, recovery and reconstitution of border and transportation systems. Issues concerning border and transportation security are inextricably linked with global security policies affecting the international supply chain and the cross-border transportation of goods and passengers. Therefore, class discussions and readings will examine the international framework and context of border and transportation security policies.

HMLS 7750  The National Challenge  (3)  

The goal of this course is to explore the published works of leading thinkers regarding the evolving nature of Homeland Security and assist students with the tools and resources necessary to gain an understanding of the principles prescribed. Students will learn techniques oriented toward understanding the threats posed to modern society, while staying abreast of the current and future roles and responsibilities of all levels of government agencies in countering threats from the prospective of all hazards preparedness. The political, economic, and practical issues of implementation are thoroughly examined. The course will examine responses to the terrorist threat as well as natural and manmade disasters to include public policy legislation and documents, such as national security strategies, homeland security decision directives, the National Response Framework and National Incident Management System. An overview of the history of The Department of Homeland Security model of planning, protecting, responding, and recovering from a natural disaster and terrorist attack is analyzed. This course provides an overview of Terrorism, Homeland Security, and risk assessment methodologies. Students will learn how to identify vulnerabilities, analyze and mitigate risk, and harden critical infrastructure sites through countermeasure proposals. This course also includes an examination of the basic legislation and operations of the U.S. Department of Homeland Security and its role in protecting the United States by detecting, deterring, preventing, and responding to potential threats, current and future. 

HMLS 7800  Cyber Threats and Homeland Sec  (3)  

This course takes an in-depth look at cyber threats in relation to personal, organizational, economic and national security. Students will apply their understanding of the variety and nature of cyber threats from the perspective of a cybersecurity manager by gaining an understanding of the commercial and national security cross-threats posed by hackers. This includes studying the impact and relationship of digital espionage, cyber war, cyber terrorism, computer hacking, viruses, communications eavesdropping, forgery, and disruption to information flow to the enterprise. The course also covers legal challenges to national policies for securing cyberspace and their relationship to, and impact on, privacy and civil liberties.

HMLS 7801  Special Topics  (3)  

Special Topics in Homeland Security Studies. Course may be repeated unlimited times for credit.

Course Limit: 99

HMLS 7802  Special Topics  (3)  

Special Topics in Homeland Security Studies. Course may be repeated unlimited times for credit.

Course Limit: 99

HMLS 7803  Special Topics  (3)  

Special Topics in Homeland Security Studies. Course may be repeated unlimited times for credit.

Course Limit: 99

HMLS 7804  Special Topics  (3)  

Special Topics in Homeland Security Studies. Course may be repeated unlimited times for credit.

Course Limit: 99

HMLS 7805  Special Topics  (3)  

Special Topics in Homeland Security Studies. Course may be repeated unlimited times for credit.

Course Limit: 99

HMLS 7850  Law & National Security  (3)  

This course will survey and explore domestic laws (constitutional, statutory, and regulatory), executive branch decisions and many of their corresponding judicial interpretations that authorize, expand or constrain the U.S. government’s pursuit of its national security policy objectives. This course is organized into four categories: (I) the foundations of U.S. national security powers, (II) the use of force abroad, (III)intelligence gathering and (IV)detaining, interrogating and prosecuting terrorist suspects. This graduate-level course is conducted as a lecture class and in seminar fashion with an emphasis on encouraging and incorporating robust dialogue, engagement and sharing of insights and ideas, integrating and correlating assigned course readings and selected media resources with real world events. Students should expect to acquire a substantive understanding of the balance of liberty and security struck by the executive, legislative and judicial branches to combat threats to the homeland. Course may be repeated unlimited times for credit.

Course Limit: 99

HMLS 7900  HMLS Capstone  (3)  

This course synthesizes the full range of knowledge, skills, and abilities students developed over the entirety of their homeland security studies. Students will integrate and apply key concepts through a community based project, developing a proposal and conducting this project at a public or non-profit sector entity. At the end of the semester, the project will be presented both to the chosen organization and their class colleagues. Students will integrate critical decision making skills with a unique and local hands-on learning experience. A written report documenting all aspects of the project will be presented for faculty approval.

HMLS 7940  Transfer Credit  (3)  

Transfer credit. Course may be repeated unlimited times for credit.

Course Limit: 99

HMLS 7941  Transfer Credit  (3)  

Transfer credit.

HMLS 7990  Emergency Mgmt Mitigation  (3)  

Course may be repeated unlimited times for credit.

Course Limit: 99