Social Work (SOWK)

Social Work (SOWK)

SOWK 1000  Trauma! A Survey Course  (3)  

This hybrid survey course introduces students to the universal concept of trauma and the global scope and impact of traumatic experience on individuals and communities. Students have the unique opportunity to be involved in the development of TraumaQuest, an innovative online Course Game that reinforces educational objectives and challenges students to apply knowledge in a gaming environment designed to simulate disaster and promote resiliency. The techniques and methodology pioneered during the development phase of TraumaQuest will provide students with an interdisciplinary examination of trauma and resilience, as well as facilitate engagement through student input on design considerations and stylization of academic content.

SOWK 2000  Intro Social Policy/Prac  (3)  

This course examines the processes that influence the development of social policy and social services. Included are legislative and political processes, models of policy analysis, service delivery and policy implementation. Effects of these on people are considered from global, political, economic and social policy perspectives. This course is developed around the general proposition that social workers utilize knowledge and skills to carry out roles and functions critical for practice. Such knowledge and skills include the application of social policy analysis, the legislative process, the role and impact of politics and political choice on the quality of life of people, and the effect of economic-social policy decision and judicial actions on social services. In addition, the course examines the variability of the common and uncommon attributes of service delivery systems.

SOWK 2100  Family Trauma-A Survey Course  (3)  

Trauma Foundations is an online only graduate course aimed at students being exposed to and critically evaluating the complex factors that affect people and their relationships following a traumatic event across the life cycle and across various traumatic events and circumstances. Students will focus on understanding the causes, consequences, assessment, and treatment trauma at the individual, interpersonal, and community levels. Through examination, discussion group leadership activities, and other assignments student learn about undergraduate students’ experiences with trauma, along with an examination of their own experiences and those of others in their life. They are more prepared to engage in personal refection about how their life experiences may affect social work practice. Students will develop an understanding of how differing theoretical frameworks can empower and / or oppress diverse populations exposed to trauma. They will also learn to communicate this understanding in a professional and ethical way with fellow graduate students, the instructor, and those undergraduate students in the discussion group they lead. Collectively and together with other courses, students will be more competent assessment, intervention, and evaluation in social work practice.

SOWK 2220  Drug Use: Univ & Inner City  (3)  

This course is designed to explore the epidemiology, prevalence, and culture of embeddedness of polydrug use and abuse among college students and inner-city residents. Students will compare and contrast the sociopolitical, sociocognitive, legal, and economic processes that contribute to high risk health behaviors in college and inner-city communities. Participants will develop and understanding of how one's family, friends and current systemic anti-drug initiatives come to shape high-risk health behavior patterns. Panel presentations by former polydrug users from each community will be held with a focus on developing creative solutions for a growing problem.

SOWK 2230  Guns & Gangs  (3)  

Unlike adult crimes, most juvenile delinquency is committed in groups. The aim of this course is to examine national and local gang dynamics within the context of weapon availability, drug markets, turf issues, and the economy. The rapidly changing social variables of race, social class, migration, and immigration are explored relative to gang membership, chronic gang problems, and solutions.

SOWK 2510  Making Meaning of Trauma  (3)  

This course is about the suffering that may be caused by traumatic events, and the way that suffering is soothed through spirituality and faith. In this class students will: *explore the early history of religion and health, and through the benefit of a mind-body spirit approach to resilience; *learn about disaster impact - to a community, a family, and an individual - and the ways in which disaster recovery tests the human spirit; *learning the basics of stress and trauma from a clinical perspective, and from the perspective of the major religions traditions (Christianity, Judaism, Islam, Hinduism, Buddhism, non-believers, etc.; *discuss concepts such as pain, suffering, despair, pleasure, joy, forgiveness, grace and transformation; *acquire skills (e.g., relaxation and stress reduction methods) that, when practiced regularly, will be useful when life takes a dark turn for you or someone you know; and *learn about trauma theory and religions traditions, and ways in which an integrated approach to trauma recovery may be transformative.

SOWK 3200  No One Lives Forever: Death, Dying, and Grief in the Modern Era  (3)  

This course will help students learn about the ways we interact with illness and death. Students will explore how serious health crises impact individuals and families. The exploration continues through end-of-life decision-making and death. This course examines funeral practices locally in New Orleans and then shifts to global practices demonstrating different perceptions of death and familial/community connections with deceased. The course examines special topics such as suicide, euthanasia, physician-assisted death, and violent death through the lens of individuals and families and then in the broader context of communities and policy. Students will be asked to reflect on their own values and beliefs about end-of-life decisions and life after death beliefs.

SOWK 4000  SPP: Emerging Programs & Polic  (3)  

This course is in the social policy curriculum area required for undergraduate SP&P Coordinate Majors. Students will apply both social work and interdisciplinary perspectives to analyze contemporary social welfare policy issues and programs at the federal, state and local levels. This course will explore the historical, economic, political, ideological, and other social conditions that influence policy development in the United States. Specific policy areas discussed include: means-tested social welfare programs, immigration, education, intimate partner violence, community violence, incarceration and health. This course will give particular attention to the impact of social policies and programs on at-risk or marginalized populations (e.g. people of color, people with disabilities, women, children, LGBTQ individuals), highlighting social and economic justice dimensions of social policy and potentials for policy reform. Prerequisite(s): SOWK 2000.

Prerequisite(s): SOWK 2000.

SOWK 6670  Social Work  (12)  

SOWK 6940  Transfer Coursework  (0-20)  

Transfer coursework at the 6000 level. Departmental approval required.


Maximum Hours: 99

SOWK 7000  Trauma Foundations  (2-3)  

Trauma Foundations is an online only graduate course aimed at students being exposed to and critically evaluating the complex factors that affect people and their relationships following a traumatic event across the life cycle and across various traumatic events and circumstances. Students will focus on understanding the causes, consequences, assessment, and treatment trauma at the individual, interpersonal, and community levels. Through examination, discussion group leadership activities, and other assignments student learn about undergraduate students’ experiences with trauma, along with an examination of their own experiences and those of others in their life. They are more prepared to engage in personal refection about how their life experiences may affect social work practice. Students will develop an understanding of how differing theoretical frameworks can empower and / or oppress diverse populations exposed to trauma. They will also learn to communicate this understanding in a professional and ethical way with fellow graduate students, the instructor, and those undergraduate students in the discussion group they lead. Collectively and together with other courses, students will be more competent assessment, intervention, and evaluation in social work practice.

SOWK 7010  Family Trauma  (3)  

Family Trauma is an elective graduate course that explores the roles and reactions of families to trauma in all contexts and how best to help traumatized families. The course is designed to introduce you to the concept and universality of trauma, the commonly observed definitions and theories of trauma, the causes and consequences of trauma, the critical risk and protective factors associated with trauma resilience, and to provide an overview and the best practices for helping traumatized families. The course used an anti-oppressive, trauma-informed psychosocial lens that promotes human development. The overall purpose of the course is to prepare professionals for working with the traumatized by being familiar with the research, theory, and practice of family trauma of promoting recovery and mental health. This course takes an anti-oppressive social work practice approach, tying together the values of social justice with the recognition of power differentials in the interpersonal and professional relationships. In doing so, the course also explores the importance of understanding and helping families who are underserved. This class will utilize a number of instructional techniques including: lectures, case studies, class discussion, and interactive group activities both online and offline. Prerequisite(s): SOWK 7320.

Prerequisite(s): SOWK 7320.

SOWK 7015  Collective Trauma  (3)  

Collective Trauma is an elective graduate course that explores the roles and reactions to collective trauma in all contexts and how best to help collective trauma survivors. The course is designed to introduce you to the concept of collective trauma following an overview of the universality of trauma, the commonly observed definitions and theories of trauma, the causes and consequences of trauma, the critical risk and protective factors associated with trauma resilience, and to provide an overview and best practices for helping those most impacted by collective trauma. Natural disasters war, terrorist attacks, genocide, slavery, and catastrophic accidents are important examples of collective trauma. Collective trauma creates In their wake, survivors who experience and struggle with similar challenges Including the psychosocial and emotional, as well as medical Injuries and conditions. The course uses an anti-oppressive, trauma-informed psychosocial lens that promotes human development.

SOWK 7026  Leadership in Disaster  (3)  

This course will dive into recent disasters (Hurricane Harvey, Hurricane Maria, and others) as the backdrop to explore how theories of leadership ring true or are challenged in practice. Students will be invited to recognize that leaders in the disaster space must be students of people—their needs, motivations, and expectations. Students will have the opportunity to hear from a number of seasoned leaders who will speak to experiences navigating policy, power dynamics and personalities. The course will conclude with the opportunity for students to identify strategies, approaches, traits, and behaviors of leaders to be emulated and to craft those into a personal development roadmap for use in their careers as leaders in the disaster space.

SOWK 7075  Disaster MentalHealth Interven  (3)  

Disaster Mental Health Interventions is an elective course that explores the role of mental health practitioners in disaster contexts using an anti-oppressive social work practice lens. The course is designed to follow the disaster management cycle, identifying the unique roles and responsibilities of disaster mental health practitioners in meeting the needs of diverse individuals, families, and communities that are impacted by disasters. The course introduces students to six practice methods and the settings in which these methods may be used. In addition, the course discusses how to building resilience, foster posttraumatic growth, and addresses the risk of compassion fatigue in helpers following disasters. Prerequisite(s): SOWK 7320.

Prerequisite(s): SOWK 7320.

SOWK 7100  Social Work & Spirituality  (2-3)  

This course provides a framework of knowledge, values, skills and experiences to promote culturally competent, ethical, spiritually-sensitive Social Work practice which takes into account diverse expressions of spirituality. In adopting a holistic perspective to guide practice, spirituality will be viewed as a vital and essential dimension of the bio-psycho-social assessment and treatment planning process.

SOWK 7110  Professional Foundations  (1)  

This foundation course provides a developmental overview of the breadth of social work, including its definition, scope, history, ethics and values, required competencies, and the basics of becoming a reflective practitioner. The course focuses on the future development of the individual student as a professional. The course defines relationship-centered practice within a clinical-community context as part of the introduction to the TSSW curriculum. Prerequisite(s): SOWK 7130*. * May be taken concurrently.

Prerequisite(s): SOWK 7130*.
* May be taken concurrently.

SOWK 7120  Soc Welfare History & Policy  (3)  

The course focuses on both the historical development of American social welfare policy and the practice of policy analysis in relation to contemporary social welfare policies. Issues central to understanding American social welfare policy such as poverty, racism, sexism, globalization, privatization and faith-based policies are addressed in this course.

SOWK 7130  Diversity and Social Justice  (2,3)  

This course is aimed at enabling students to engage in diversity and difference in practice with people who have multiple, intersecting dimensions of diversity, including (but not limited to): age, class, color, culture, disability and ability, ethnicity, gender, gender identity and expression, immigration status, marital status, political ideology, race, religion/spirituality, sex, sexual orientation, and tribal sovereign status. Using an overarching critical theoretical framework of oppression and liberation/resilience, students will learn to critically evaluate the social and historical sources of contemporary social problems. Awareness of the multiple intersecting dimensions of privilege will be a running theme throughout the course. Students will engage in continuous self-awareness and critical consciousness to understand to manage personal values and their effects on the diverse people with whom social workers work. Students will work to become an ally and work in solidarity with others and advance the human rights of these populations.

SOWK 7140  Intro to Orgs & Community Prac  (2)  

This foundation course addresses community practice as it relates to human service agencies with special attention to non-profit and grassroots organizations. Building upon 2 theoretical approaches to human service organizations/agencies and their distinct at tributes, the course addresses key practice knowledge, skills, and values that promote, develop, and maintain organizations that effectively meet community and client needs. This course also emphasizes models of community intervention as integral to the social work professional's role in community and addresses challenges working with diverse populations in terms of community engagement, assessment, intervention and evaluation.

SOWK 7210  Theories of Human Behavior 1  (2)  

Kurt Lewin's "nothing so practical as a good theory" paradigm provides the philosophical base for this course. Meta theoretical principles are used to understand theories of human relationship development across the lifespan. These meta theoretical principles - connection and disconnection; power and diminishment; purpose and invisibility - provide an overarching perspective for social workers to function as clinical community social workers with a relationship centered focus. These principles are applied to child and adolescent development and to issues related to diversity, oppression, class and social justice. This is the first semester of a two-semester sequence.

SOWK 7211  Human Behavior and the Social Environment I  (3)  

Human Behavior and the Social Environment I is aimed at exposing students to the complex factors that may affect human development and experiences across the life course. Students will understand theories of human behavior and the social environment (HBSE), and critically evaluate their implications when applied across diverse populations. Students will gain knowledge of human development across differing contexts and understand salient topics across stages of the life course. Through examinations, papers, and presentations, students will demonstrate their knowledge of theories, apply theories to specific contexts, and engage in personal reflection about how their life experiences may affect social work practice. Students will develop an understanding of how differing theoretical frameworks can empower and/or oppress diverse populations, and communicate this understanding in a professional and ethical way. This knowledge will provide the foundation to enable social workers to understand multiple factors when engaging with individuals and families to critically analyze theories, which will enable competent assessment, intervention, and evaluation in social work practice.

SOWK 7220  Theories of Human Behavior 2  (2)  

In this required second semester course of the two semester sequence, the focus continues to center around Kurt Lewin's "nothing as practical as a good theory" paradigm. (Kurt Lewin, 1944, University of Iowa Studies in Child Welfare) The meta theoretical principles are used to continue to understand theories of human relationship development as they relate to the life span issues of adult development. Those principles - connection and disconnection; power and diminishment; purpose and invisibility - also highlight continuing discussions about diversity, oppression, class, social justice and the intersectionality of the "isms" with each other. Prerequisite(s): SOWK 7130 and 7210.

Prerequisite(s): SOWK 7130 and 7210.

SOWK 7221  Human Behavior and the Social Environment II  (3)  

Theories of human behavior is a two-course sequence aimed at exposing students to the complex factors that may affect human development and experiences across the life course and explore biopsychosocial theories across systems. This course explores the impact of social systems on human behavior in terms of socioeconomic, sociopolitical and sociocultural forces, from a variety of theoretical perspectives. This course examines the ways in which systems promote or pose challenges in the achievement and maintenance of optimal health and well-being of clients. The effects of prejudice and discrimination on individuals and groups, based on race, ethnicity, gender, affectional orientation, class, or other stigmatizing characteristics are emphasized are explored. Building upon theoretical approaches to human service organizations/agencies and their distinct attributes, the course addresses key practice knowledge, skills, and values that promote, develop, and maintain organizations that effectively meet community and agency needs. This course also emphasizes models of community and agency intervention as integral to the social work professional's role In community and addresses challenges working with diverse populations in terms of community engagement assessment, intervention and evaluation. Prerequisite(s): SOWK 7211.

Prerequisite(s): SOWK 7211.

SOWK 7230  Community Org-Policy Advocacy  (3)  

This methods course addresses community organization which is a form of social work practice that works through collective response to structural inequities. Through organizing - mobilizing people to combine their resources to act strategically on behalf of common interests - social workers aim for social change found through collective human potential. Through policy practice and policy advocacy, a social worker can transform the desires of community into laws and regulations that help achieve the goal of social and economic justice. Policy practice is an integral element of social work as practiced in all settings-at the local, state, and national levels, as well as within micro, mezzo, and macro levels of intervention. Prerequisite(s): SOWK 7120.

Prerequisite(s): SOWK 7120.

SOWK 7300  Clinicl Work w/ Child/Ad  (2-3)  

This advanced elective provides the student with knowledge of the physical, psychological and social development of children and adolescents. Course content related to clinical intervention with children includes: 1) acquiring the skills needed to keenly observe and analyze child behavior for its hidden meaning; 2) how to gather a complete and meaningful social history of the child and family within a clinical-community context; 3) interviewing and assessment techniques; and 4) treatment techniques. Students examine a wide variety of problems common to adolescents as well as the social and psychological underpinnings that accompany these. Practical and specific assessment and treatment skills relevant to typical arenas of clinical- community social work practice with children and adolescents and their families are of primary concern.

SOWK 7310  Intro to Direct Social Work Pr  (3)  

This foundation course is the first of three direct practice methods courses (it is followed by Methods II and Advanced Methods). It focuses on teaching students a broad and integrated variety of helping methods that span individuals, families, and groups within a clinical- community perspective. The central vehicle for navigating and managing these many systems is the social worker-client relationship, or Relationship-Centered Practice. Students will learn how to engage, assess, and facilitate change in small systems within the context of larger systems such as neighborhoods and communities. Students will learn to perform major social work practice roles and communication processes as well as procedures necessary for resource development, linkage, and utilization. Prerequisite(s): SOWK 7130* and 7210*. (* May be taken concurrently.)

SOWK 7320  SW Prac with Inds Fams &Groups  (3)  

This required methods course is the second of two foundation courses and integrates clinical with community practice. It contains distinct modules for practice particularly with individuals and families, and with small groups. The course continues to emphasize relationship-centered practice as a central premise for intervention, addressing traditional direct service approaches. Prerequisite(s): SOWK 7130.

Prerequisite(s): SOWK 7310.

SOWK 7330  Adv Clinical-Community Prac  (5)  

This advanced course integrates material from Methods I and Methods II and builds on content delivered in Theory, Tools, Professional Foundations and Field. The focus of the course is on the application of advanced relationship-centered clinical-community methods to a variety of complex cases. While students in this course are also taught advanced methods for discrete areas of practice (e.g., advanced case-management, intervention and termination, treatment matching, policy analysis, direct action organizing, locality development), integration of practice skills and professional identity is driven by the use of cases that require students to challenge and "work across" conventional conceptualizations of "micro," "mezzo," and "macro" practice. Prerequisite(s): SOWK 7310 and 7320.

Prerequisite(s): SOWK 7310 and 7320.

SOWK 7331  Advanced Integrated Clinical and Community Practice I  (3)  

This advanced course integrates material from Methods I and Methods II and builds on content delivered in Theory, Tools, Professional Foundations and Field. The focus of the course is on the application of advanced relationship-centered clinical-community methods to a variety of complex cases. While students in this course are also taught advanced methods for discrete areas of practice (e.g., advanced case-management, intervention and termination, treatment matching, policy analysis, direct action organizing, locality development), integration of practice skills and professional identity is driven by the use of cases that require students to challenge and "work across" conventional conceptualizations of "micro," "mezzo," and "macro" practice within local, national, and global milieus. Prerequisite(s): SOWK 7320 or by permission of instructor.

Prerequisite(s): SOWK 7320.

SOWK 7341  Advanced Integrated Clinical and Community Practice II  (3)  

This advanced course integrates material from Methods I and Methods II and builds on content delivered in Theory, Tools, Professional Foundations and Field. The focus of the course is on the application of advanced relationship-centered clinical-community methods to a variety of complex cases. While students in this course are also taught advanced methods for discrete areas of practice (e.g., advanced case-management, intervention and termination, treatment matching, policy analysis, direct action organizing, locality development), integration of practice skills and professional identity is driven by the use of cases that require students to challenge and "work across" conventional conceptualizations of "micro," "mezzo," and "macro" practice within local, national, and global milieus. Prerequisite(s): SOWK 7331 or by permission of instructor.

Prerequisite(s): SOWK 7331.

SOWK 7345  Psychopathology and the DSM  (3)  

This course will provide you with an overview of mental health assessment and diagnostic tools, including the Diagnostic Statistical Manual (DSM) categories, and touches on treatment strategies and techniques. Building on the knowledge base acquired in the foundation course, this course examines the relationship between the biological, psychological, social, environmental, and cultural influences and emotional and mental health from an ecological context. Particular attention is given to variations in the assessment process and access to treatment for populations at social and economic risk. In addition, students examine the political and social implications of mental health and their relations to social work values and ethics. Prerequisite(s): SOWK 7310.

Prerequisite(s): SOWK 7310.

SOWK 7350  Leadership & Mgmt Human Svc Or  (2-3)  

The course covers the theoretical foundations, principles, skills and ethics of leadership and management in human service organizations. Theories of leadership and management are examined for usefulness in the social work profession, as well as for understanding organizational behavior and worker motivation. Through in-class lecture and discussion as well as agency-based consultations, students may observe and report on strategic planning activities; working with boards; entrepreneurial and intrapreneurial initiatives in the nonprofit sector; establishing partner ships; human resources, teamwork, and diversity; supervising for improved clinical-community and management skills; budgeting; and career development.

SOWK 7360  Contempr Pract w/ Couples &Fam  (2-3)  

This advanced elective is designed to integrate theories, practice principles, and intervention strategies with traditional and nontraditional couples and families. It builds upon those theories and methods learned in the Theory Sequence (SOWK 7210, 7220) and in the Methods Sequence (SOWK 7310, 7320 & 7330). Contemporary couples and family treatment derives from post- modern theory and philosophy. How post-modern theories and methods are translated to couples treatment is also a major aspect of this course. While each session features mini-lectures, the course is case-centered and participatory. Integration of theories and practice principles as they are translated to specific intervention strategies is the major thrust of this course. A final oral presentation focuses on case analysis, treatment planning, and implementation of post-modern intervention strategies. Prerequisite(s): SOWK 7320.

Prerequisite(s): SOWK 7320.

SOWK 7365  Clinical Practice in Addiction  (3)  

This is a class designed to give the student clinical practice in conceptualizing, assessing and treating addictions and substance abuse and misuse in a relational context. Clinical Practice in Addiction and Substance Abuse is a 3-credit elective course designed to build upon the prerequisite course, SOWK 7370 or SOWK 7345. This clinical course has a focus on the importance of connection and family in healing from addiction and substance abuse. The relationship between trauma and addiction will be discussed. The course is organized in five modules: (1) The brain and attachment in healing, (2) Clinical assessment of addictions and substance misuse/abuse, (3) Treatment planning and implementation, (4) The ecosystem of the substance abuse and addiction health care delivery system and healing, (5) Work with specific populations. In the course, students will learn the importance of connection and relationships in healing. We will study the ecosystem of the addiction and substance abuse care delivery system. Treatment modalities and transitions will be mastered. Exams will build on one another throughout the five modules of the course. Throughout the five modules, the student will conceptualize a client and his/her family relational ecosystem. The student will complete a comprehensive assessment and treatment plan (with interventions) for each stage of recovery. Prerequisite(s): SOWK 7320.

Prerequisite(s): SOWK 7320.

SOWK 7370  Intro to Behavior Pharmacology  (3)  

This elective course provides basic information about the naming of drugs and the process of pharmaceutical drug development for examining the biological social and behavioral mechanisms of substance use are presented. Current trends, cultural, ethnic, gender, and age related issues of substance use are explored. The impact of various forms of substance use on the family system and communities will be discussed. Prerequisite(s): SOWK 7320.

Prerequisite(s): SOWK 7320.

SOWK 7380  Treatmnt of Anxiety & Depressn  (2-3)  

The course covers the etiologies, manifestations, nosology, and biopsychosocial interventions with depression and anxiety -the two most common complaints of clients in primary care and mental health service settings. Two general approaches serve as the epistemological foundation in the course: the Strengths Perspective and a coordinated holistic biopsychosocial approach that considers physiological, psychological, social, developmental, familial, cultural and environmental factors in both the assessment of and interventions with anxiety and depression. Students engage in active learning and practical case application of cognitive-behavioral, solution-focused, interdisciplinary case management, and comparative psychotherapy techniques. Accessing and evaluating the research literature using principles of Evidence Based Practice are integrated into examination of outcomes effectiveness of comparative clinical- community treatment approaches. Prerequisite(s): SOWK 7320.

Prerequisite(s): SOWK 7320.

SOWK 7410  Research for Evidence-Based SW  (3)  

This course focuses on the principles and process of Evidence-based Practice (EBP), a methodology for making practice decisions that emphasizes formulating practice questions, locating and evaluating information to answer these questions, applying the knowledge gained to practice situations, and evaluating outcomes. Essential to this approach is the core competency of critical thinking, which will be introduced and developed. Also inherent in EBP is the competency of information literacy, which will be addressed as students are familiarized with information resources vital to social work and learn strategies or accessing them. Additionally, students will work towards the effective use of acquired knowledge with others. Students will learn to utilize some of the written, verbal, and visual tools underlying the core competency of communication skills. They will also begin to explore the competency of team building with particular emphasis placed on working in learning groups.

SOWK 7420  Program Evaluation  (2)  

Program evaluation is designed to continue guiding the student in mastering tools for lifelong inquiry and learning in social work practice. The course facilitates the students' successful entrance and integration into the field placement setting by addressing the key learning issues involved in that process. Program evaluation is useful and relevant to the field agency and a hands-on experience which explicates the interface between methods of inquiry and analysis and direct social work practice. Prerequisite(s): SOWK 7410.

Prerequisite(s): SOWK 7410.

SOWK 7421  Research for Program Evaluation and Evidence Based Social Work  (3)  

In this course, students begin to develop mastery of some of the tools or skill sets required for successful completion of the MSW program and for ethical, effective clinical-community social work practice, including the evaluation of social work programs. The course focuses on the methods used to evaluate research and implement research methods into social work practice. The principles of Evidence-Based Practice (EBP) and research methodology will be identified and applied in order to integrate the knowledge gained to diverse practice contexts and the evaluation of practice and program outcomes. Students are familiarized with research knowledge resources vital to social work practice and evaluation and learn strategies for efficiently accessing and applying emerging research knowledge in order to effectively evaluate practice and programs, This course introduces and develops knowledge, values, skills and cognitive and affective processes related primarily to CSWE Competency 4: Engage in practice-informed research and research-informed practice and CSWE Competency 9: Evaluate practice with individuals, families, groups, organizations, and communities,

SOWK 7430  Data Analysis and Interp  (3)  

In this class, students continue to develop skills related to the access, creation, utilization, and dissemination of knowledge for social work practice. The course focuses primarily on the principles, methods, and applications of quantitative and qualitative data analysis used in clinical-community social work research. The course emphasizes the practical application of data analysis knowledge in both assessing the quality of existing research evidence and contributing to knowledge through systematic inquiry on topics of concern to social work practitioners and their clients. The utilization of computer applications for data management and analysis is stressed. Prerequisite(s): SOWK 7410 and 7420.

Prerequisite(s): SOWK 7410 and 7420.

SOWK 7431  Data Analysis and Interpretation for Program Evaluation Research  (3)  

In this three-credit course, students continue to develop skills related to the accession, creation, utilization, and dissemination of knowledge for social work practice and program evaluation. The course focuses primarily on the principles, methods, and applications of quantitative and qualitative data analysis used in clinical-community social work research and program evaluation. The course emphasizes the practical application of data analysis knowledge in both assessing the quality of existing research evidence and contributing to knowledge through systematic inquiry on topics of concern to social work practitioners and their clients. Special emphasis is given to issues of norms, validity, and generalizability of measures, statistical methods, and data interpretation for research with diverse populations. The utilization of computer applications for data management and analysis is stressed. Prerequisite(s): SOWK 7421.

Prerequisite(s): SOWK 7421.

SOWK 7440  Integrative Capstone Seminar  (2,3)  

The Capstone Seminar in relationship-centered, integrated clinical and community practice is designed to be integrative of all the previous foundation and advanced courses. The goal is to produce a graduate who is grounded in professional identity and in the values and purpose of social work. This is accomplished through an inquisitive, dialectic process among students and professor. Fundamental questions will be revisited about structural oppression, local and global issues in social work, knowledge and thinking for social work, systemic oppression, and the exercise of social work practices. Prerequisite(s): SOWK 7331.

Prerequisite(s): SOWK 7331.

SOWK 7450  Death, Dying and Grieving  (2-3)  

This course examines End-of-Life issues and how these issues impact the clients, families and social workers. Students will have the opportunity to examine their feelings regarding death, dying, grieving and other losses through class readings and exercises, discussions and field trip(s).

SOWK 7520  Field Practicum & Seminar I  (4,5)  

Field placements are in community agencies where professional social work supervision is provided to guide the development of a full range of social work practice skills and helping the learner assume a professional social work role. As is possible, placements are made in accordance with a student's stated learning objectives and professional career goals. Tulane School of Social Work maintains close ties with agencies in the development of the educational focus of field instruction. Prerequisite(s): SOWK 7120, 7130, 7211, and 7310.

Prerequisite(s): SOWK 7120, 7310, 7130 and 7211.

SOWK 7530  Field Practicum & Seminar II  (4,5)  

Field placements are in community agencies where professional social work supervision is provided to guide the development of a full range of social work practice skills and helping the learner assume a professional social work role. As is possible, placements are made in accordance with a student's stated learning objectives and professional career goals. Tulane School of Social Work maintains close ties with agencies in the development of the educational focus of field instruction. Prerequisite(s): SOWK 7520.

Prerequisite(s): SOWK 7520.

SOWK 7540  Field Practicum Seminar III  (4,5)  

Field placements are in community agencies where professional social work supervision is provided to guide the development of a full range of social work practice skills and helping the learner assume a professional social work role. As is possible, placements are made in accordance with a student's stated learning objectives and professional career goals. Tulane School of Social Work maintains close ties with agencies in the development of the educational focus of field instruction. Prerequisite(s): SOWK 7530.

Prerequisite(s): SOWK 7530.

SOWK 7650  Theory &Treatmnt of Addictions  (2-3)  

This elective course will advance students' knowledge of a biopsychosocial framework addressing the use and abuse of mood altering substances and other addictive processes. This framework will form the foundation for exploring a variety of models explaining addictive processes. Neuroscience, cognitive, behavioral, psychodynamic, systems and postmodern theories will be utilized as means to identify addictive processes and formulate interventions. Current evidence-based methods will be explored. The impact of various forms of addictions will be addressed on different populations.

SOWK 7760  Human Sexuality  (2-3)  

Complementary, inclusive, and sometimes conflicting perspectives inform the human sexuality context for an exploring of the ways that sexuality is situated and managed within social work practice. The course is designed to acquaint social work students with the necessary factual and theoretical background to make cognitive behavioral, and experiential connections in work with individuals, couples, and communities that are experiencing difficulties with close human interaction. Students have the opportunity to learn how theories of sexuality have informed practice and how these formulations are currently being questioned and disputed. Within that context of critical awareness, students explore their own level of comfort with sexuality as it relates to clinical situations. The course expects students to extend their knowledge of social work practice to the area of sexual disorders. Treatment is based on a fundamental knowledge of human sexual behavior, including biological aspects, developmental characteristics over the life cycle, courtship, marriage, sex roles, contributions from feminist thinking, and healthy relationships. Male and female sexual dysfunction is discussed in the contact of partner- facilitated treatment.

SOWK 7840  Independent Study  (1-3)  

SOWK 7880  Restorative Approaches  (2-3)  

This elective course will cover conflict and methods for its resolution from a restorative approaches perspective. It will touch on both theory and skills-based practice and participants will come to understand the principles of restorative approaches and learn the skills to enact them. Topics will include restorative philosophy, community building, Restorative alternative methods and consensus-based meeting facilitation. The course is a combination of lecture, discussion, and practice. We will use role-plays extensively and the scenarios will range across personal and professional life. We will start at the foundation of Restorative Approaches, personal skills, and community building and work our way up through various levels of conflict. This will be a skill-focused course built towards naturalizing restorative techniques. Restorative Approaches are more than set techniques for given scenarios. They are adaptable habits and practices that feed into a larger social movement aimed at dismantling systems of oppression and violence. These theories and skills will dovetail with any social work focus area by strengthening skills for dialogue and reconciliation.

SOWK 7910  Field Practicum & Seminar PT 1  (2,2.5)  

Field placements are in community agencies where professional social work supervision is provided to guide the development of a full range of social work practice skills and helping the learner assume a professional social work role. As is possible, placements are made in accordance with a student's stated learning objectives and professional career goals. Tulane School of Social Work maintains close ties with agencies in the development of the educational focus of field instruction. Prerequisite(s): SOWK 7120, 7130, 7211 and 7310.

Prerequisite(s): SOWK 7120, 7130, 7211 and 7310.

SOWK 7920  Field Practicum & Seminar PT 2  (2,2.5)  

Field placements are in community agencies where professional social work supervision is provided to guide the development of a full range of social work practice skills and helping the learner assume a professional social work role. As is possible, placements are made in accordance with a student's stated learning objectives and professional career goals. Tulane School of Social Work maintains close ties with agencies in the development of the educational focus of field instruction. Prerequisite(s): SOWK 7910.

Prerequisite(s): SOWK 7910.

SOWK 7930  Field Practicum & Seminar PT 3  (2,2.5)  

Field placements are in community agencies where professional social work supervision is provided to guide the development of a full range of social work practice skills and helping the learner assume a professional social work role. As is possible, placements are made in accordance with a student's stated learning objectives and professional career goals. Tulane School of Social Work maintains close ties with agencies in the development of the educational focus of field instruction. Prerequisite(s): SOWK 7920.

Prerequisite(s): SOWK 7920.

SOWK 7940  Field Practicum & Seminar PT 4  (2,2.5)  

Field placements are in community agencies where professional social work supervision is provided to guide the development of a full range of social work practice skills and helping the learner assume a professional social work role. As is possible, placements are made in accordance with a student's stated learning objectives and professional career goals. Tulane School of Social Work maintains close ties with agencies in the development of the educational focus of field instruction. Prerequisite(s): SOWK 7930.

Prerequisite(s): SOWK 7930.

SOWK 7950  Field Practicum & Seminar PT 5  (2,2.5)  

Field placements are in community agencies where professional social work supervision is provided to guide the development of a full range of social work practice skills and helping the learner assume a professional social work role. As is possible, placements are made in accordance with a student's stated learning objectives and professional career goals. Tulane School of Social Work maintains close ties with agencies in the development of the educational focus of field instruction. Prerequisite(s): SOWK 7940.

Prerequisite(s): SOWK 7940.

SOWK 7960  Field Practicum & Seminar PT 6  (2,2.5)  

Field placements are in community agencies where professional social work supervision is provided to guide the development of a full range of social work practice skills and helping the learner assume a professional social work role. As is possible, placements are made in accordance with a student's stated learning objectives and professional career goals. Tulane School of Social Work maintains close ties with agencies in the development of the educational focus of field instruction. Prerequisite(s): SOWK 7950.

Prerequisite(s): SOWK 7950.

SOWK 7990  Journey to India  (2-3)  

This class directly addresses the essential relationship between self-awareness, personal growth and professional practice. It incorporates practice methods and community development theory and practice to address the needs of the growing community of Tibetan refugees in the foothills of the Himalayan Mountains. Culturally competent community development and practice is a central tenet and incorporates the integrity and worth of individuals and communities with diverse backgrounds. As an advanced elective, students will have a profound opportunity to integrate classroom learning with field experiences in their application of knowledge, skills, values and ethics to community development and multi-cultural practice in an international arena.

SOWK 8880  No Courses This Term  (0)  

SOWK 9010  Portfolio Planning Seminar I  (1)  

These 9000 level seminars (Portfolio Planning Seminar Units 1-4) are designed to offer individual academic support to Doctor of Social Work (DSW) students to develop their individual APP and professional portfolios. The Portfolio Planning Seminar provides individualized support for students as they develop their research questions, construct an argument, focus their review of the literature, identify statistical and data analytic methods appropriate to the research question, and demonstrate cohesion between the identified research topic and the application of a theoretical framework. These required courses are designed for students to identify their individual research interests relevant to their respective fields and to develop these interests into an approved APP Proposal.

SOWK 9020  Portfolio Planning Seminar II  (1)  

These 9000 level seminars (Portfolio Planning Seminar 1-4) are designed to offer individual academic support to Doctor of Social Work (DSW) students to develop their individual APP and professional portfolios. The Portfolio Planning Seminar provides individualized support for students as they develop their research questions, construct an argument, focus their review of the literature, identify statistical and data analytic methods appropriate to the research question, and demonstrate cohesion between the identified research topic and the application of a theoretical framework. These required courses are designed for students to identify their individual research interests relevant to their respective fields and to develop these interests into an approved APP Proposal.

SOWK 9030  Portfolio Planning Seminar III  (1)  

These 9000 level seminars (Portfolio Planning Seminars 1-4) are designed to offer individual academic support to Doctor of Social Work (DSW) students to develop their individual APP and professional portfolios. The Portfolio Planning Seminar provides individualized support for students as they develop their research questions, construct an argument, focus their review of the literature, identify statistical and data analytic methods appropriate to the research question, and demonstrate cohesion between the identified research topic and the application of a theoretical framework. These required courses are designed for students to identify their individual research interests relevant to their respective fields and to develop these interests into an approved APP Proposal.

SOWK 9040  Portfolio Planning Seminar IV  (1)  

These 9000 level seminars (Portfolio Planning Seminars 1-4) are designed to offer individual academic support to Doctor of Social Work (DSW) students to develop their individual APP and professional portfolios. The Portfolio Planning Seminar provides individualized support for students as they develop their research questions, construct an argument, focus their review of the literature, identify statistical and data analytic methods appropriate to the research question, and demonstrate cohesion between the identified research topic and the application of a theoretical framework. These required courses are designed for students to identify their individual research interests relevant to their respective fields and to develop these interests into an approved APP Proposal.

SOWK 9101  Leader Evidence Inform Pract  (4)  

This course introduces students to scholarly leadership principles in social work practice. The course allows the development of critical thinking skills by gaining an understanding of scientific, analytical, and ethical approaches utilized when conducting program evaluation and service outcomes research. Students' mastery of course content prepares them to develop, use, and effectively communicate evidence informed social work research knowledge.

SOWK 9102  Theory, Models & Methods  (4)  

This course provides students opportunities to examine the structure of selected theories, models and principals that social workers use to support their practice. Specifically it provides both a framework and a forum for students to: (a) hold conversations about the historical and contemporary factors affecting social work practice theory, including the values of American culture and changing technologies; (b) examine practice effectiveness research; and (c) propose newly configured models for theory supported practice.

SOWK 9200  Program & Clinical Evaluation  (4)  

The purpose of the summer immersion course is to prepare students with the needed skills to measure the effectiveness and appropriateness of programs and interventions. In this course students will learn how to apply action research with community organizations and have the opportunity to apply service outcomes research methods to a local agency. Students will also be introduced to descriptive statistics and effective report writing. The course will further prepare students to develop a critical frame for designing real world program and clinical evaluations.

SOWK 9203  Hist Policy Social Welfare  (4)  

This seminar introduces students to the historical, political, and sociological approaches to investigate the formation, evolution, and implementation of social policy. Research studies in policy formation, policy implementation and policy evaluation are stressed. Materials on the legislative processes, societal institutions and societal values as reflected are stressed. The seminar is designed to provide a basic theoretical foundation for students to conduct advanced policy research. Students will review and critique some of the seminal theoretical literature that informs policy research and will examine specific applications of social theory to policy questions.

SOWK 9204  Quant Method Research  (4)  

This course is an introduction to research methods for doctoral students in social work. This course introduces students to the principles; methods and analytical techniques associated with quantitative social work research and service outcome methods. The course allows the development of critical thinking skills by gaining an understanding of scientific, analytical, and ethical approaches utilized when conducting research for social work practice. Students will become familiar with efforts to achieve and measure variables in the context of human and social development. Students' mastery of course content prepares them to develop, use, and effectively communicate empirically-based social work research with experimental, quasi-experimental, and non-experimental research designs.

SOWK 9205  Pedagogy Development  (4)  

This course introduces the student to the philosophies of adult education, and strategies to enhance learning in the classroom with special emphasis on incorporating diversity content and conflict resolution in the classroom. Students will increase proficiency in the process of learning and teaching especially linking to CSWE Core Competencies. Content will focus on development of specific teaching skills, including curriculum/syllabus design, lecture preparation, assignments and evaluation. Students will also create a teaching philosophy that will be included as part of their professional portfolio.

SOWK 9206  APP Research Ethics  (4)  

This course is designed for doctoral students beginning to develop their own program of research. It will provide an emphasis on understanding the basic expectations and requirements of research proposal, as well as the ethical and pragmatic considerations to conduct a research study. The primary goal of this course is to provide an opportunity for students to identify research interests relevant to their respective fields and develop these interests into an IRB proposal effectively.

SOWK 9210  Qualitative Mehtd & Analy  (4)  

This course introduces the student to the purposes, goals, and logic of qualitative/naturalistic research methods as they are applicable to social work problems and questions. The course is orientated toward providing students with (1) an introduction to qualitative inquiry and analysis; (2) a beginning experience with research skills appropriate to the ecological perspective on social work practice. The emphasis in this course is on the discovery function of knowledge building activities. In this, as in all courses in the program, the ultimate aim is to prepare students to effectively meet their responsibility to continually assess and improve their own practice and to add to the general store of social work practice knowledge.

SOWK 9307  Applied Social Statistics  (4)  

This course introduces students to applied social statistics where students will learn to analyze, interpret, and present real world findings. Content includes descriptive and inferential statistics for univariate, bivariate, and multivariate analyses, and the use of electronic data processing technology to manage and analyze secondary data. At the end of this course, students will be able to apply statistical techniques and communicate results common to program evaluation.

SOWK 9308  Nonprofit Mgmt & Development  (4)  

The focus of this course is on agency leadership. The purpose is for students to understand different management aspects, roles of boards, strategic planning and fundraising ethics for non-profit management. Students will be able to articulate the theoretical foundations that affect the growth of and external influences on the nonprofit sector. Students will also be able to perform basic analyses of financial information provided by nonprofit entities, including budgetary calculations, cost allocation techniques, capital planning, and operational needs.

SOWK 9309  Comm Adv & Part Research  (4)  

The focus of this course is on community leadership. The purpose is on the development of research knowledge and skill needed for effective evidence-based clinical-community research application. This course will specifically prepare student with the needed skills for effective community level (macro) practice. Students will be able to identify and describe theories and relevant models of effective community practice and theoretical models for community organization. Students will also be introduced to community based participatory research (CBPR) approaches and methods if CBPR consisted with program evaluation.

SOWK 9310  APP Grant Writing  (4)  

This course is designed for doctoral students to further develop their programs of research. It will provide an emphasis on grant writing and funding attainment to conduct a research study. The primary goal of this course is to provide an opportunity for students to identify potential grants, funding justification, budgeting, and program evaluation; culminating in development of an effective grant proposal.

SOWK 9410  Quantitative Methods I  (3)  

SOWK 9420  Qualitative Methods I  (3)  

SOWK 9430  Intermediate Statistics  (3)  

SOWK 9440  Adv Multivar Appro & Inf  (3)  

SOWK 9450  Portfolio Dev Seminar V  (1)  

These 9400 level seminars (Portfolio Development Seminars 5-8) are designed to build on the 9000 level planning courses and offer individual academic support to Doctor of Social Work (DSW) students to complete their individual APP. The Portfolio Development Seminar provides individualized support for academic writing, data analytics, manuscript submission, grant proposals, and/or program evaluation. These required courses are designed for students to complete their APP proposal and further develop their professional portfolios.

SOWK 9460  Portfolio Seminar VI  (1)  

These 9400 level seminars (Portfolio Development Seminars 5-8) are designed to build on the 9000 level planning courses and offer individual academic support to Doctor of Social Work (DSW) students to complete their individual APP. The Portfolio Development Seminar provides individualized support for academic writing, data analytics, manuscript submission, grant proposals, and/or program evaluation. These required courses are designed for students to complete their APP proposal and further develop their professional portfolios.

SOWK 9470  Portfolio Develop Seminar VII  (1)  

These 9400 level seminars (Portfolio Development Seminars 5-8) are designed to build on the 9000 level planning courses and offer individual academic support to Doctor of Social Work (DSW) students to complete their individual APP. The Portfolio Development Seminar provides individualized support for academic writing, data analytics, manuscript submission, grant proposals, and/or program evaluation. These required courses are designed for students to complete their APP proposal and further develop their professional portfolios.

SOWK 9480  Portfolio Develop Seminar VIII  (1)  

These 9400 level seminars (Portfolio Development Seminars 5-8) are designed to build on the 9000 level planning courses and offer individual academic support to Doctor of Social Work (DSW) students to complete their individual APP. The Portfolio Development Seminar provides individualized support for academic writing, data analytics, manuscript submission, grant proposals, and/or program evaluation. These required courses are designed for students to complete their APP proposal and further develop their professional portfolios.

SOWK 9510  Res. Meth., Dev. & Impl.  (3)  

SOWK 9550  Research Design In Sowk  (3)  

SOWK 9610  Soc Wk Pract & Thry:Comp  (3)  

SOWK 9620  Sys and Theories of Org  (3)  

SOWK 9640  Advanced Sem Ego Psych  (3)  

SOWK 9650  Small Group Theory/Treat  (3)  

SOWK 9670  Lit Sem:Child/Adolsnt I  (3)  

SOWK 9680  Measure Social Phenomena  (4)  

This course will provide students with the opportunity to expand their knowledge and understanding of the complexities related to working in varying contests given evolving priorities, pressures, opportunities and constraints. Students will become familiar with efforts to achieve and measure variables in the context of human development. This approach takes into consideration the multiple processes and inherent challenges that come into play across theoretical, economic, environmental, and political in society.

SOWK 9690  Lit Sem:Child/Adolsnt 3  (3)  

SOWK 9710  Hist App To Soc Welfare  (3)  

SOWK 9720  Scholarshp of Pract In P  (3)  

SOWK 9730  Read In Hist of Soc Wel  (3)  

SOWK 9740  Advanced Readings  (1-3)  

Course may be repeated up to unlimited credit hours.


Maximum Hours: 99

SOWK 9750  Read In Soc Wel Org Adm  (3)  

SOWK 9760  Advan Read In Hum Beh Sc  (3)  

SOWK 9800  Ways of Knowing, Learnin  (3)  

SOWK 9810  Conflict In Families  (3)  

SOWK 9820  Sem In Advanced Meth II  (3)  

SOWK 9840  Integrative Seminar  (3)  

SOWK 9850  Sp Proj In Soc Wk Meth I  (3)  

SOWK 9870  Sp Proj Soc Wk Meth II  (3)  

SOWK 9880  Qualifying Exam  (4)  

The purpose of this seminar is for the student to demonstrate their ability to develop a command of the literature in particular areas and subareas and synthesize this knowledge into a coherent framework. Students are required to demonstrate considerable knowledge about the evolution and growth of ideas in the area as well as the issues that continue to engage scholars. Students will need to go beyond formal coursework to master independently their identified area of expertise. Students must also demonstrate an ability to situation specific research fields, constructs, and theories within a broader academic framework.

SOWK 9900  Clinical Internship I  (3)  

SOWK 9920  Clinical Internship III  (3)  

SOWK 9930  General Internship  (3)  

SOWK 9940  Dissertation Dev Sem I  (1)  

Course may be repeated up to unlimited credit hours.


Maximum Hours: 99

SOWK 9941  Intro to Quant. Methods Rsh  (4)  

This course is an introduction to statistical analysis for doctoral students in social work. It covers basic statistical methods for use with experimental, quasi-experimental, and non-experimental research designs. The course provides basic mathematical, conceptual, and design tools for data analysis in social work research. Beginning computer applications for data analysis in social work research are also introduced.

SOWK 9942  Intro Qual & Inter Hum Inquiry  (4)  

This course introduces the student to the purposes, goals, and logic of qualitative/naturalistic research methods as they are applicable to social work problems and questions. The course is orientated toward providing students with (1) an introduction to the “field” of qualitative inquiry and (2) a beginning experience with research skills appropriate to the ecological/field perspective on social work practice. The emphasis in this course is on the discovery function of knowledge building activities. In this, as in all courses in the program, the ultimate aim is to prepare students to effectively meet their responsibility to continually assess and improve their own practice and to add to the general store of social work practice knowledge.

SOWK 9943  Applied Social Statistics  (4)  

This course introduces students to applied social statistics where students will learn to analyze, interpret, and present real world findings. Content includes descriptive and inferential statistics for univariate, bivariate, and multivariate analyses, and the use of electronic data processing technology to manage and analyze secondary data. At the end o0f this course, students will be able to apply statistical techniques and communicate results common to program evaluation.

SOWK 9950  Dissertation Dev Sem II  (3)  

SOWK 9951  Research Methods, Dev & Implem  (4)  

This course introduces students to scholarly leadership principles in social work practice. The course allows the development of critical thinking skills by gaining an understanding of scientific, analytical, and ethical approaches utilized when conducting program evaluation and service outcomes research. Students' mastery of course content prepares them to develop, use, and effectively communicate evidence informed social work research knowledge.

SOWK 9955  Designs for Clinical Comm Prac  (4)  

This course focuses on the development of research knowledge and skill needed for effective evidence-based clinical-community research application. The purpose of this course is to prepare students with the needed skills to measure the effectiveness and appropriateness of program interventions. This course will specifically prepare student with the needed skills for effective community level (macro) practice.

SOWK 9960  Sw Research Practicum I  (1)  

SOWK 9961  SW Theory, Prac Models & Meth  (4)  

This course provides students opportunities to examine the structure of selected theories, models and principals that social workers use to support their practice. Specifically it provides both a framework and a forum for students to: (a) hold conversations about the historical and contemporary factors affecting social work practice theory, including the values of American culture and changing technologies; (b) examine practice effectiveness research; and (c) propose newly configured models for theory supported practice.

SOWK 9970  Sw Research Practicm II  (1)  

Course may be repeated up to unlimited credit hours.


Maximum Hours: 99

SOWK 9971  Hist Approaches to Soc Welfare  (4)  

This seminar explores the historical context for the development of professional social work values, ideologies and methods.

SOWK 9972  Schol Practice Policy Context  (4)  

This seminar introduces students to the political and sociological approaches to investigate the formation, evolution, and implementation of social policy. Research studies in policy formation, policy implementation and policy evaluation are stressed. Materials on the legislative processes, societal institutions and societal values as reflected are stressed. The seminar is designed to provide a basic theoretical foundation for students to conduct advanced policy research. Students will review and critique some of the seminal theoretical literature that informs policy research and will examine specific applications of social theory to policy questions.

SOWK 9980  Teachers Practicum  (0)  

Course may be repeated up to unlimited credit hours.


Maximum Hours: 99

SOWK 9990  Dissertation Research  (0)  

This course students register for while working on their dissertation products. Course may be repeated up to unlimited credit hours.


Maximum Hours: 99

SOWK 9991  Adv Clinical Project  (1)  

These seminars are designed to offer individual academic support to Doctor of Social Work (DSW) students to complete their individual ACP. Students will have the opportunity to apply knowledge and skills from their coursework in research methods, research design, and data analysis techniques. The goal of these courses is to provide additional individualized faculty support for DSW students in their final year of DSW courses and completion of the ACP.

SOWK 9992  Portfolio Planning Seminar  (1)  

These seminars are designed to offer individual academic support to Doctor of Social Work (DSW) students to develop their individual APP and professional portfolios. The Portfolio Planning Seminar provides individualized support for students as they develop their research questions, construct an argument, focus their review of the literature, identify statistical and data analytic methods appropriate to the research question, and demonstrate cohesion between the identified research topic and the application of a theoretical framework. These required courses are designed for students to identify their individual research interests relevant to their respective fields and to develop these interests into an approved APP Proposal.

SOWK 9993  Adv Clinical Proj Dev Sem I  (4)  

This course is designed for doctoral students beginning to develop their own program of research. It will provide an emphasis on understanding the basic expectations and requirements of research proposal, as well as the ethical and pragmatic considerations to conduct a research study. The primary goal of this course is to provide an opportunity for students to identify research interests relevant to their respective fields and develop these interests into a proposal effectively.

SOWK 9994  Adv Clinical Proj Seminar I  (1)  

These seminars are designed to offer individual academic support to Doctor of Social Work (DSW) students to develop their individual ACP. These required courses are designed for students to identify their individual research interests relevant to their respective fields and to develop these interests into an approved ACP Proposal. The ACP seminar provides additional support for students as they develop their research questions, construct an argument, focus their review of the literature, identify statistical and data analytic methods appropriate to the research question, and demonstrate cohesion between the identified research topic and the application of a theoretical framework. This ACP course will incorporate the knowledge and skills developed in previous course work in the program. The goal of these courses is to provide additional individualized faculty support for DSW students throughout their enrollment in the program.

SOWK 9995  Adv Clinical Proj Seminar II  (4)  

This course is designed for doctoral students to further develop their programs of research. It will provide an emphasis on grant writing and funding attainment to conduct a research study. The primary goal of this course is to provide an opportunity for students to identify potential grants, funding justification, budgeting, and program evaluation; culminating in development of an effective grant proposal.