Anthropology (ANTH)

Anthropology (ANTH)

ANTH 1010  Intro to Biological Anth  (3 Credit Hours)  

This course provides an introduction to the study of Homo Sapiens from an evolutionary, biological, behavioral, and biocultural perspective. Topics covered include: the history of evolutionary thought, basic human genetics, the anatomy and behavioral ecology of the living primates, human evolution via the study of fossil hominins, modern human variation and adaptation, and the study of the human skeleton in forensic anthropology and bioarchaeology.

ANTH 1020  Cultural Anthropology  (3 Credit Hours)  

The observed range of variation of ways of life around the world. The cross-cultural investigation of becoming and being human. Comparative treatment of social organization, subsistence activities, values, and religion.

ANTH 1030  Languages of The World  (3 Credit Hours)  

This course aims to equip students with some basic facts about the world's languages, a fundamental prerequisite to understanding the nature of human language. We will be examining: (1) the diversity of languages across space and time, and (2) the fundamental similarities of languages. We will address a range of questions about language through an exploration of the following areas: language families and historical relationships, linguistic typology, language universals, sound and structure features of the world's languages, and writing systems.

ANTH 1040  Ancient Societies  (3 Credit Hours)  

Introduction to key transformations in human history and prehistory as they have been identified and discussed by anthropological archaeologists. Consideration of basic principles of archaeology, human evolution and expansion, origins of agriculture and sedentary village societies, development of archaic states and ancient civilizations. Of interest to majors and prospective majors in anthropology and related fields.

ANTH 1050  Native America: Introduction  (3 Credit Hours)  

Native Americans have played and continue to play an important part in American society. Largely invisibilized by the foregrounding of other ethnic minority groups, Native Americans in the US struggle for recognition (federal, state, and local), for survival as cultural groups (cf. Ile de Jean Charles evacuation/resettlement), and for basic rights (legal protections, religious freedom, education, health services, and subsistence). While focusing primarily on Native American groups in the US, this course will explore the histories of indigenous peoples. Vignettes of the cultures, languages, philosophies and lifeways of indigenous Americans provide the backdrop for coming to know the modern autochthonous peoples.

ANTH 1140  Freshman Seminar  (3 Credit Hours)  

Description varies; specific description available when offered.

ANTH 1190  Freshmen Writing Seminar  (4 Credit Hours)  

Freshmen Writing Seminar.

ANTH 1290  Semester Abroad  (1-20 Credit Hours)  

Semester Abroad.

ANTH 1880  Writing Intensive: ANTH 1020  (1 Credit Hour)  

Writing Intensive.

ANTH 1940  Transfer Coursework  (3 Credit Hours)  

Transfer Coursework.

ANTH 2020  Visual Languages Across Cultur  (3 Credit Hours)  

Most research on language takes speech as the main domain of investigation. However, humans use not only speech but also meaningful hand movements called 'gestures' when they communicate. Furthermore,there are many communities where the speech is absent in linguistic communication. For example, deaf communities across the world use sign languages that are produced and perceived only in the visual-spatial modality. This course aims to give n interdisciplinary and state of the art overview of the role of the body in the structuring and functioning of the human language faculty. The course will present cross-cultural and cross-linguistic findings from these new fields relating them to discussions of embodied cognition and semantics, situated use of language, the link between language and action and their neural correlates. This course fullfills the departmental goal of providing its students with the knowledge of appreciation for the cultural and linguistic diversity of humanity.

ANTH 2030  Anthropology of Women and Men  (3 Credit Hours)  

A cross-cultural survey of women in society and culture among hunters and gatherers, pastoral nomads and agriculturalists of Oceania, the Near East, Africa, and the New World. Kinship and female symbolism in Africa, women and men in myths in traditional societies. Cross-cultural variability of women's roles and status and the variability of women's and men's language and behavior.

ANTH 2340  Introduction to Archaeology  (3 Credit Hours)  

Introduction to basic principles of archaeological method and theory. Consideration of the history of archaeology, major paradigms in archaeological thought, basic techniques of fieldwork, basic techniques in analyzing archaeological finds, and intellectual frameworks for interpreting patterns in archaeological datasets. Consideration of selected case studies. Of interest to majors and prospective majors in anthropology, and potentially to majors in classical archaeology and related fields.

ANTH 2350  Arch & Power the Ancient World  (3 Credit Hours)  

This class will explore how political, religious, ideological and cultural ideas among the world’s earliest urban civilizations were inscribed in the landscape in the form of monumental construction. To achieve these objectives the class will study five different regions of the ancient world with the goal of evaluating how built space (buildings, monuments, and public plazas) helped develop and maintain socio-political hierarchy, i.e., "civilization".

ANTH 2360  Ancient Trade & Commerce  (3 Credit Hours)  

Introduction to the study of regional and interregional trade and exchange in ancient times based on archaeological evidence. This course considers diverse theories and methods developed to make archaeological inferences about ancient trade and exchange and examines how the study of trade and exchange informs us about sociopolitical systems and economic relations and how they vary over time and space. Of interest to majors and prospective majors in anthropology and related fields.

ANTH 2390  Semester Abroad  (1-20 Credit Hours)  

Semester Abroad.

ANTH 2880  Writing Intensive:  (1 Credit Hour)  

Writing practicum.

ANTH 2940  Transfer Coursework  (3 Credit Hours)  

Transfer Coursework.

ANTH 3010  Hunters and Gatherers  (3 Credit Hours)  

Comparative study of selected modern and past groups of hunter-gatherers. Anthropological approaches to understanding subsistence practices, social organization, and cultural change in non-agricultural societies. Both ethnographic and archaeological cases will be considered.

ANTH 3050  North American Indians  (3 Credit Hours)  

Native North American cultures from the time of European contact to the 20th century. Cultural variation from the Arctic to northern Mexico and the adjustments to modern life.

ANTH 3060  South American Indians  (3 Credit Hours)  

Ethnology of the indigenous peoples of lowland South America and adjacent southern Central America. The course examines cultural developments from prehistory to the present. Models for the classification of indigenous cultures, societies, and languages are critically reviewed.

ANTH 3090  Selected Cultural Systms  (3 Credit Hours)  

Systematic treatment of specific cultures of the past and present.

ANTH 3091  Selected Cultural Systems  (3 Credit Hours)  

Selected Cultural Systems.

ANTH 3092  Selected Cultural Systems  (3 Credit Hours)  

Selected Cultural Systems.

ANTH 3093  Selected Cultural Systems  (3 Credit Hours)  

Selected Cultural Systems.

ANTH 3094  Selected Cultural Systems  (3 Credit Hours)  

Selected Cultural Systems.

ANTH 3095  Selected Cultural Systems  (3 Credit Hours)  

Selected Cultural Systems.

ANTH 3096  Selected Cultural Systems  (3,4 Credit Hours)  

Selected Cultural Systems.

ANTH 3097  Selected Cultural Systems  (3 Credit Hours)  

Selected Cultural Systems.

ANTH 3098  Selected Cultural Systems  (3 Credit Hours)  

Selected Cultural Systems.

ANTH 3099  Selected Cutural Systems  (3 Credit Hours)  

Selected Cultural Systems.

ANTH 3110  Cultrs Sub-Saharn Africa  (3 Credit Hours)  

A survey of the cultures of sub-Saharan Africa from the time of European contact to the present. A detailed study of selected African cultures, identifying, and explaining cultural diversity and unity of African cultures, and comparing African cultures with cultures of other geographic areas. Inequality, development, the family, gender roles, kinship systems, and world view are considered.

ANTH 3120  Anth of Sex & Reproductn  (3 Credit Hours)  

An exploration of the interrelatedness of biological, behavioral, cultural, social, and political aspects of human sex and reproduction. Current issues, such as new reproductive technologies, the biology and culture of pregnancy and childbirth, mate choice, will be examined from within an evolutionary framework and/or using a cross-cultural approach.

ANTH 3140  Primate Behavr & Ecology  (3,4 Credit Hours)  

An introduction to the social and physical diversity of the Order Primates, emphasizing the biology, ecology, and behavior of living nonhuman primates. Social structure will be explored from an evolutionary perspective, and the ecological and social constraints on behavioral flexibility will be examined. Examples will cover both field and laboratory investigations of nonhuman primates.

ANTH 3160  Peoples of The Pacific  (3 Credit Hours)  

Introduction to the cultures of Polynesia, Micronesia, Melanesia, and Australia from the first settlement to the emergence of modern nation-states.

ANTH 3190  Economic Anthropology  (3 Credit Hours)  

The study of economic behavior in band, tribal, and peasant societies. Emphasis on the impact of culture and environment on economic decision-making in the Third World. Competing theoretical approaches, particularly evolutionary, ecological, substantivist and Marxist are critically reviewed.

ANTH 3195  Financial Lives  (3,4 Credit Hours)  

This course focuses on the expansion of financial services on daily life in both U.S. and non-U.S societies. We will use ethnographic case-studies to explore different institutions and mechanisms by which people organize their debt and credit relations. The first part of the course will be an overview of anthropological concepts and frameworks for understanding debt and sociality. The second part will focus on the diverse meanings of homeownership in U.S. society, Brazil, and China.

ANTH 3200  Magic Witchcraft and Religion  (3 Credit Hours)  

This course is an exploration into religion and the occult. We will examine a wide range of topics, such as hauntings, spirit possession, the role of evil in the moral imagination, and the construction of symbols as well as various practices associated healing, witchcraft (or sorcery) accusations, and the experience of suffering and death. Anthropological approaches challenge the categories of "religion" and "witchcraft", which stem from Western conceptions of reality, Christianity, and ethnocentric views of the "other".

ANTH 3220  Ethnology of Insular SE Asia  (3 Credit Hours)  

Peoples and cultures of Island or Maritime Southeast Asia, from the Andaman Islands in the west to the Bismarck Archipelago in the east. Biogeographic distinctions between Indo and Austro SE Asia; evolutionary implications for people and fauna. Paleolithic, Neolithic, bronze, and iron ages from 40 kya to 1st millennium CE. Early developments in Austro-Asiatic and Austronesian languages. Commercial contacts with ancient Rome, India, China. Impacts of Hinduism, Buddhism, Islam, and Christianity. Prehistoric and early colonial entrepôts. Colonial development of ethnicities associated with Chinese, Arabic, Malay, Tamil, Aslian, Kmer, Portuguese, Dutch, and English. Identity issues, ethnohistory and ethnobiology  of Aslian (Orang Asli) peoples to the present.

ANTH 3260  Highland Mex Prehistory  (3 Credit Hours)  

Patterns and processes of cultural development in the highlands of central Mexico, western Mexico, and Oaxaca as known from archaeological and ethnohistorical data. Early cultures, Toltecs, Aztecs, Mixtecs, Zapotecs.

ANTH 3290  The Nature of Language  (3 Credit Hours)  

Language as a reflection of the human mind and the role of language in defining the essence of humanity. Language and the expression of social values. Emphasis on analysis of primary linguistic data. Critical examination of theories of linguistic structure.

ANTH 3300  History of Writing  (3 Credit Hours)  

This course looks at the different systems of writing which have been used in various cultures through time with attention to the materials and purpose in relation to the cultures. Orientation to and practice in decipherment are included. Finally, the issues of modern script development are introduced.

ANTH 3310  Historical Linguistics  (3,4 Credit Hours)  

Survey of the field of paleopathology, the study of health and disease in ancient populations. Topics include methods for identifying evidence of injury and disease in bones, teeth, and mummified tissue; ancient medicine and surgery; chemical approaches to reconstructing diet; and human health trends through time.

ANTH 3320  Archaeology of Gender  (3 Credit Hours)  

Gender refers to the cultural norms, ideals, expectations, and rules that shape the relationships and activities of men, women, and children. People in the present and recent past have conceptualized gender in many different ways, and there is great diversity in the range of gender roles and gender relations seen in different cultures. With ethnographic and historic evidence as interpretive guides, archaeologists can offer insights into the nature of gender roles and gender relations in past societies, and into the ways that gender norms have contributed to major trends in the history and prehistory of humankind. This course is an introduction to the archaeological study of the roles of men, women, and children in past societies; the relationships among women, men, and children in past communities; and the ideologies that have legitimized and naturalized those gender roles and gender relations. Case studies covered in the course are drawn from the archaeology of the Americas, Africa, Asia, and Europe.

ANTH 3330  Anthropology of Gender  (3 Credit Hours)  

A theoretical and ethnographical examination of how gender is constructed across cultures. Topics include sex and gender, gender identity, bodily experiences, masculinity and femininity, gender roles, kinship and gender, gender stratification, and gender equality, as well as gender, ethnicity, and class.

ANTH 3350  Culture and Religion  (3 Credit Hours)  

Religions, ideas, ritual, and organization of primitive peoples; nativistic and messianic movements; function of religion in social systems.

ANTH 3360  Anthropology of Cities  (3 Credit Hours)  

This course focuses on anthropological approaches to cities and urban life. Topics include the cultural meanings of public space and the built environment, processes of social differentiation and class formation, the role of capital, and the emergence of social movements. The second half of the course is organized around a comparison of four ethnographic case-studies of cities outside the United States and Europe. Throughout the semester, studies will also discuss how anthropological approaches may be applied to New Orleans.

ANTH 3370  Locating Southeast Asia  (3 Credit Hours)  

This course examines contemporary Southeast Asia. As one of the most diverse regions in the world, the region confounds easy characterization. The first part of the course provides students with a broad overview of the social, cultural, and political institutions of the region with a focus on Indonesia, Thailand, the Philippines, and Vietnam. The second part turns to contemporary issues including political and economic development, religious change, and cultural constructions of identity. Readings include academic essays, short stories, and full-length ethnographies.

ANTH 3385  Cultural Creolization  (3 Credit Hours)  

Overview of theory and ethnography of current and historic processes of sociocultural contact and comingling primarily in the New World African-European-Indigenous societies that result in emergent shared group identifications. The course examines how creolization allows for cultural continuity and creativity in such new social orders where a Creole language and/or identity may be formed. Admission: anthropology and linguistics majors at level of Jr. or above; graduate students; others by permission of instructor

ANTH 3395  Cultures of NO/Fr La  (3 Credit Hours)  

This course focuses on symbolic meaning in the vernacular expressive culture or folkloric forms of community groups in New Orleans, French Louisiana, the Gulf South region and selected out migrant locations. It addresses differential identities of tribal, ethnic, regional, religious, linguistic, occupational, class and gender affiliations--and examines aesthetic forms as a primary means to do so. Some of these are largely intangible such as music and dance, ritual and festival, narrative and jokes; others are tangible or material culture to varying degrees such as the built environment (houses, boats, landscape use), crafts, costumes and cuisine. All are examined via ethnographic and historical writing, oral histories and documentary media as to how shared cultural knowledge is performed in an array of contexts. These include dancehalls, Carnival parades, second lines, work settings, festivals, neighborhood museums, sacred spaces and so on.

ANTH 3400  Language and Culture  (3 Credit Hours)  

Acquiring and using techniques of conducting linguistic field work. Investigation of one or more languages by working with native speakers. Emphasis on defining problems, developing and testing hypotheses.

ANTH 3420  Lx Semantics  (3 Credit Hours)  

Semantics is the study of meaning in language. As humans use language they produce meaning in any number of ways: through intonation, through body language, through contextual (in)congruities, and through the linguistic structures used. Semanticians try to limit their study to the last of these, while always aware of other meaning-creating tools. In this course, we begin with the study of logic-based theories of meaning, examining propositional meanings. At each stage in this initial investigation, we will keep in mind how this carefully restricted corpus compares with situated language use. In the second part of the course, we will systematically build in context to approach an understanding of natural semantics, the way human beings mean.

ANTH 3430  Archaeol Culturl Landscp  (3 Credit Hours)  

Landscapes are outcomes of natural and cultural activity.  Natural landscapes are formed by geological processes and climatic patterns.  Cultural landscapes are shaped by the intentional and unintentional effects of human activity on the environment.  The archaeological study of cultural landscapes, therefore, concerns both the social and symbolic dimensions of local and regional environments as well as anthropogenic effects on environments at local, regional, and global scales.  Archaeologists interested in cultural landscapes study features such as earthen mounds, embankments, monumental architecture, ritual places and cemeteries, the built environment of human settlements, canals, ditches, fields, and signs of human impacts on natural environments.  Archaeologists typically study specific sites, but the archaeological study of landscapes emphasizes the significance of specific sites within broader regional contexts.  An archaeological perspective benefits the study of landscapes because archaeologists are inherently interested in the effects of both long-term trends and short-term changes on the ways that groups of people interact with each other and with their environment.  In this course, emphasis is placed on selected case studies from Europe, the North Atlantic, the South Pacific, and the Americas, although selected comparative cases and examples shall also be drawn from Africa and Asia.

ANTH 3435  Disasters and Past Societies  (3 Credit Hours)  

Consideration of case studies in how past societies have prepared for or responded to disasters, critical reflection on "natural" and "cultural" forces that contribute to catastrophic events and that shape the aftermath of disasters, comparative assessment of relationships between culture and environment, and application of resilience theory and models of cultural collapse towards understanding the effects of disasters on past societies.

ANTH 3440  Dialectology  (3 Credit Hours)  

Introduction to language variation both geographically and socially. The course looks at the history and methods of dialectology as well as the ways speakers demonstrate identity through speech patterns.

ANTH 3441  Lexicography  (3 Credit Hours)  

Lexicography is the making of dictionaries. Dictionaries take many forms and fulfill many functions. Dictionaries have evolved new formats; professional lexicographers share word gleaning with internet users. Dictionaries may be monolingual, di-, tri-, or multi-lingual, etymological or encyclopedic, synchronic or diachronic, prescriptive or descriptive, terminological or generic. Dictionary construction requires a number of skills which co-vary with the type of dictionary to be produced. This course provides an overview of dictionaries, their forms, formats and histories, while fostering a basic skill set for harvesting words and compiling lexicons. Dictionaries provide a cognitive map to communities of speakers, both past and present.

ANTH 3450  Meth Observatn Behav Rsh  (3 Credit Hours)  

This course focuses on the development, design, analysis, and presentation of research on behavior using observational methods. While these methods can be used on captive populations (zoo, research center) they are also appropriate for studies of free-ranging animals, including human beings. The student will be exposed to the specific challenges of observational research, and learn appropriate levels of analysis.

ANTH 3470  Many Faces of Islam  (3 Credit Hours)  

Islam is a fundamental human experience in diverse socio-historic and cultural milieux. Ethnographies of Muslim communities highlight the heterogenity of Islamic perspectives and traditions. Focus on culturally situated Islamic practices and belief systems fosters a critical understanding of the emergent Islamic identities and their historico-cultural underpinnings.

ANTH 3480  African Modernities  (3 Credit Hours)  

This course focuses on the problem of conceptualizing modernity in Africa. Examining cases from throughout the continent, we will consider cultural developments such as romantic love, fashion, and consumption as well as new forms of religiosity and novel developments in established religions, economic change, state corruption, and violence.

ANTH 3510  Ethnicity, Nationalism  (3 Credit Hours)  

Theoretical and ethnographic examinations of race, ethnicity, and nationalism. Topics also include multiculturalism, globalization, and diasporas.

ANTH 3520  Diaspora Yoruba  (3 Credit Hours)  

Familiarizes students with the fundamentals of Yoruba language and culture; shows students how Diaspora dynamics have changed Yoruba language and culture; uses Diaspora Yoruba to teach students the principles of language death and innovation involving tones, vowels, nasalization, word formation, and sentence structure.

ANTH 3535  Native Am Lang & Ling  (3 Credit Hours)  

This course will explore the richness of the linguistic diversity still preserved in the Native American languages of this hemisphere. Two thirds of the Native American languages spoken at time of European immigration have perished. Today even languages with large communities of fluent speakers face heavy assimilatory pressures. Language loss and simplification are rapidly changing the wordscape of the Americas.

ANTH 3550  Soc Change, Sustainability ID  (3 Credit Hours)  

The St. Martin Program is an intensive, immersive service-learning program that combines a 3-credit class (ANTH 3550: Social Change, Sustainability, and Postcolonial Identity in the Caribbean) with community engagement. The course is based in the small binational island of St. Martin (Lesser Antilles). It includes a mandatory, zero-credit service-learning component, which will satisfy the 2nd tier service- learning requirement for sophomores, juniors, and seniors. The primary purpose of the program is for students to meaningfully engage with locals, work and meet with community members committed to cultural, food, and economic sustainability, as well as gain an in-depth understanding of anthropological concepts and research methodology, especially as they relate to postcolonial contexts and the shaping of cultural/linguistic identities and socio- economic/political systems.

ANTH 3560  Environmental Archaeolog  (3 Credit Hours)  

This course examines the fundamentally important relationship between human behavior and environmental change in the past. It looks at both the ways in which humans have responded to their environmental circumstances and the ways in which human activities have influenced environmental conditions at various scales. The course explores methods for learning about environmental conditions in the past and the nature of human interaction with the environment. The course also presents basic information on some particularly important topics concerning past human/environment interactions, including (1) causes of global climate change, (2) human roles in Pleistocene megafauna, (3) post-Pleistocene adaptation, (4) the origins of agriculture and animal domestication, (5) agricultural landscape modification and environmental over-exploitation, and (6) Holocene changes in human health, including the origins of modern disease epidemics.

ANTH 3590  Introduction To Syntax  (3 Credit Hours)  

Introduction of transformational generative syntax, with examples from selected areas of English grammar. Formal models in grammatical description. Emphasis on the logic of linguistic argumentation.

ANTH 3630  Linguistic Phonetics  (3 Credit Hours)  

The course offers an overview of articulatory and acoustic phonetics with emphasis on matching acoustic cues closely with the articulatory gestures. The first part of the course will study the articulatory and acoustic cues to range of English and non-English speech sounds with information about the normal range of variation. The second part will focus on collecting and interpreting acoustic data, and using such data as evidence to solve phonological problems in normal and pathological speech.

ANTH 3640  Phonology  (3 Credit Hours)  

This course provides an introduction to phonological analysis and theory, with strong emphasis on description and analysis of data from a wide variety of languages. Major issues to be addressed include universal principles of human phonological systems, language-specific variation, constraints on representation of rules, the relationship of phonology to morphological and syntactic components of the grammar, and the historical underpinnings of current theoretical models.

ANTH 3650  Morphology  (3 Credit Hours)  

This course provides an introduction to prosodic and non-prosodic morphology with emphasis on data analysis and argumentation. With data from a variety of languages, the first part of the course will examine non-prosodic morphological processes to highlight the typology of word structure across languages. The second part will examine morphological processes conditioned by prosody, and consider the various frameworks for analyzing the data; eventually, the course will work toward a dormal model like that of McCarth and Prince's Theory of Prosodic Morphology". The main objectives of the course are: (1) to learn to analyze morphological data; (2) to learn to compare alternative analysis for a given set of data and to find evidence to choose between the alternative

ANTH 3660  Discourse Analysis  (3 Credit Hours)  

Study of written and spoken texts from a variety of languages and language use contexts. Focus on structural aspects of language (noun phrase construction and anaphora, topicalization, focus constructions, word order, deictics, and definite reference) as they relate to the situated use of language.

ANTH 3670  Language & Acquisition  (3 Credit Hours)  

This course provides an introduction to issues such as the genetic basis of language ability and acquisition; neurological aspects of linguistic knowledge; first language acquisition. Emphasis will be laid on child language data collection, description and analysis. Other issues covered are: (1) language acquisition in special populations (deaf children, blind children, children with mental retardation, children with autism and children with specific language impairment); (2) childhood bilingualism. 

Prerequisite(s): ANTH 1030 or 3290.

ANTH 3680  Language and Power  (3 Credit Hours)  

Exploration of the ways that language indexes, reflects, and constructs power. Cross-cultural study of the interrelationship of social ascriptions, attitudes toward groups and their members, and the speech patterns of in-group/out-group members. Examination of the manipulation of power and its linguistic correlates in the domains of medicine, the media, education, and the law. Effects of language policy, especially officialization and standardization, on speakers of minority languages or codes.

ANTH 3690  Language and Gender  (3,4 Credit Hours)  

An exploration of the structures of language, phonological, morphological, syntactic, semantic, and pragmatic, as they index, inter-relate with, and construct gender identities cross-culturally.

ANTH 3700  Environmtl Anthropology  (3 Credit Hours)  

Critically reviews case studies of ecosystemic and energetic relations between human populations, cultures, and the environment in diverse ethnographic settings of the world, such as Amazonia, the Great Basin, New Guinea, and Southeast Asia. Examines the historical emergence of ecological paradigms in anthropology. Compares the modern contributions of cultural ecology, evolutionary ecology, ethnoecology, and historical ecology. Evaluates potential contributions of ecological anthropology to general ecology.

ANTH 3710  Hist Ecology of Amazonia  (3 Credit Hours)  

Interactions between local peoples and Amazonian landscapes from prehistory to the present. Amazonian landscapes as an analytic unit will be examined from the interdisciplinary perspective of historical ecology. Changes and development of forests and savannas since the arrival of human beings. Historical, ecological, cultural forces involved in biological and edaphic diversity in modern forests. Long-term effects of prehistoric and historic human occupations and manipulation of landscapes. Implications for conservation and development.

ANTH 3720  Adaption Hum Variability  (3 Credit Hours)  

Biological adaptations of living human populations to their environments, and the interaction of these adaptations with cultural patterns. Relationships of body size, form, and composition to climatic and nutritional factors in various geographical groups of modern man. Major adaptive problems facing the human species are discussed and implications for the future explored.

ANTH 3730  Princ of Forensic Anthro  (3 Credit Hours)  

Introduction to forensic anthropology, a subdiscipline of physical anthropology concerned with the identification of human skeletal remains in medico-legal contexts. Surveys the history of the field and the techniques used to determine age, sex, and physical characteristics of an individual from skeletonized remains, as well as methods used for positive identification, estimating time since death, and determining cause and manner of death.

ANTH 3735  Bioarcheol of Human Sacrifice  (3 Credit Hours)  

This course will examine the literary, archaeological, and skeletal evidence of human sacrifice in past societies. It will critically review written accounts and physical evidence of the offering of human lives in ritual contexts, with a focus on archaeological sites that show convincing evidence of such activities. Case studies will be used to explore the question of why human lives were offered in particular places and times, while critically evaluating the evidence used to document and interpret such practices.

ANTH 3745  Bioarchaeology of Mummies  (3,4 Credit Hours)  

Mummified human remains open a fragile window into the past. They provide unique information about the physical characteristics, health and diet of ancient peoples, as well as information on cultural modification of the body (head shaping, piercing, tattooing, hair styles), funerary practices, and cultural concepts of death and the afterlife. Mummies can be investigated from various perspectives (textual, iconographic, biomedical, ethnographical, archaeological), but are studied most effectively using a multidisciplinary approach involving archaeologists, biological anthropologists, conservators, and specialists in medical imaging, paleogenetics and geochemistry. Bioarchaeology, the application of biological anthropology to archaeological research questions, is a term commonly used today to describe this multidisciplinary approach to studying the dead. This course will examine preserved human bodies from around the world, with an emphasis on scientific studies that seek to reconstruct their life histories and postmortem treatment.

ANTH 3750  Bones, Bodies and Disease  (3 Credit Hours)  

Survey of the field of paleopathology, the study of health and disease in ancient populations. Topics include methods for identifying evidence of injury and disease in bones, teeth, and mummified tissue; ancient medicine and surgery; chemical approaches to reconstructing diet; and human health trends through time.

ANTH 3755  Human Osteology  (3 Credit Hours)  

The objective of this course is to learn the anatomy of the human skeleton and dentition and the techniques physical anthropologists use to excavate, identify, and analyze human skeletal remains. You will learn how to identify the various bones of the skeleton, how to distinguish human from non-human bone, how to determine sex and estimate age at death; and how to measure bones in order to reconstruct living stature and physical characteristics from skeletal remains. Examples from archaeological excavations and forensic cases will be used to illustrate the kinds of information human skeletons can provide about ancient and modern populations. Practical and written exams and laboratory exercises hone your skills at recognizing anatomical landmarks, identifying fragmentary osteological material. measuring bones, and conducting a detailed skeletal inventory. 

ANTH 3760  Primate Evol & Adaption  (3 Credit Hours)  

This course will focus on the anatomy, evolution and adaptive radiation of the Order Primates. Basic information on living primates and detailed investigation of the primate fossil record will be presented. The dynamic nature of the field will be the subject of class discussion and investigative essays.

ANTH 3770  Global Vietnam  (3 Credit Hours)  

This course examines how Vietnamese-American identities are constructed and performed. The course is divided into three sections. In the first section, Diaspora and Transnationalism.

ANTH 3780  Language Death  (3 Credit Hours)  

Every fortnight a human language dies. Half the languages spoken in the Western Hemisphere at the turn of the 19th century have died. This course examines the forces that lead to language death, strategies that speakers whose linguistic heritage is endangered may deploy to revitalize their languages, and tools that linguists have used to preserve the knowledges of human speech communities.

ANTH 3850  The Four-Field Model  (3 Credit Hours)  

Philosophical underpinnings of general anthropology. Epistemological ramifications of four anthropological fields (subdisciplines) as complete coverage of the subject matter. Contingency vs. rationale in the amalgamation of the four fields, as distinctive and definitive of the holistic study of Homosapiens. Initial development of the model in the British Isles; institutionalization in 20th century North America. Connections to study of natives of the New World and salvage ethnography. Growth and specialization in subdisciplines. Debates over the logic and practicality in continuing cohesion of the model. May be taken as capstone, with ANTH 5110. Students who sign up for the capstone, will have an extra class session, times listed under ANTH 7850.

ANTH 3890  Service Learning: ANTH 3550  (0-1 Credit Hours)  

Service Learning.

Corequisite(s): ANTH 3195.

ANTH 3891  Service Learning: ANTH  (0-1 Credit Hours)  

Service Learning.

ANTH 3899  Service Learning: ANTH 3091  (0-1 Credit Hours)  

Service Learning.

Corequisite(s): ANTH 3091.

ANTH 3940  Transfer Coursework  (3 Credit Hours)  

Transfer Coursework.

ANTH 4060  Anthropology Proseminar  (3 Credit Hours)  

It is a four-field seminar course, covering archaeology, linguistics, physical anthropology and socio-cultural anthropology. Topics vary with the current research interests of the faculty presenting the course. Students do primary and secondary research, present their findings orally and in writing. This course draws together the four subdisciplines of anthropology, integrating them in the approach to a body of theory, an array of methods and an emerging set of data congruent with the topical theme.

ANTH 4080  Race and Nation Span Caribbean  (3 Credit Hours)  

This course provides a comparative survey of the interwoven dynamics of race, class and national formation in the making of the Spanish-speaking Caribbean. Drawing on a range of readings in history, media studies, music, fiction writing and poetry as well as anthropology, this course will explore the overlapping historical contexts of Cuba, Puerto Rico, and the Dominican Republic in addition to related impacts of Haiti and its Revolution. The focus of attention will be placed on the on-going centrality of racial dynamics in these island nations from slave-based sugar plantations to reggaetón music.

ANTH 4120  Conquest and Colonialism  (3 Credit Hours)  

Comparative and global perspectives on the archaeology of culture contact and colonialism.

ANTH 4130  North American Prehistory  (3 Credit Hours)  

A survey of the archaeology of Canada and the United States from the appearance of man in the New World to the arrival of the Europeans.

ANTH 4150  African Prehistory  (3 Credit Hours)  

Survey of African prehistory from the earliest tool-makers (Olduvai Gorge, etc.) to protohistoric times. Emphasis on Africa south of the Sahara for later prehistory. Africa's role in human origins, development and spread of food-producing economies, the African Iron Age, early contacts with Arabic and European peoples.

ANTH 4210  Sem In Historicl Ecology  (3 Credit Hours)  

The scientific and philosophical basis of the research program. Comparisons with cultural ecology, cultural materialism, evolutionary biology, landscape ecology. Distinctions and convergences between evolution and history. Hard-core postulates. Case studies from Amazonia, tropical Africa, Southeast Asia, East Asia (especially the Japanese archipelago and the adjoining Pacific Rim). In-class assessments of current research.

ANTH 4260  Arch Us Southwest  (3 Credit Hours)  

This course looks at the development of prehistoric and early historic cultures of the U.S. Southwest. Both archaeological and early historical evidence of indigenous peoples and early explorers will be examined.

ANTH 4270  Roots of Western Civiliz  (3 Credit Hours)  

Cultural history of Southwestern Asia and Europe from the Mesolithic, through the development of food production, to the beginnings of civilization. Emphasis upon the beginnings of complex societies and urban life and their early, pre-Roman development in Europe.

ANTH 4410  Olmec & Maya Civilizations  (3 Credit Hours)  

Examines the development of highly advanced cultures and societies in one of the centers of native American civilization. Although the presentation stresses archaeological data, the course considers pre-Hispanic aesthetic achievements, social organization, values, written records, and adaptation to varying environments.

ANTH 4510  Spec Concpts Human Paleo  (3 Credit Hours)  

The number of proposed fossil hominid/hominin species has mushroomed in recent years yet the recognition of species in the human fossil record remains a daunting task. However, in order to reconstruct the phylogenetic (ancestor-descendent) relationships among humans, our ancestors, and close collateral relatives, we must group hominin fossils into meaningful taxonomic categories, ones that likely reflect truly monophyletic (shared common ancestor) descent patterns. This course explores different evolutionary species concepts and their applicability to human paleontology. Current approaches to the reconstruction of phylogenetic relationships are then discussed, and the taxonomic status of hominin species is assessed.

ANTH 4520  Diaspora Yoruba  (3 Credit Hours)  

Familiarizes students with the fundamentals of Yoruba language and culture; shows students how Diaspora dynamics have changed Yoruba language and culture; uses Diaspora Yoruba to teach students the principles of language death and innovation involving tones, vowels, nasalization, word formation, and sentence structure.

ANTH 4560  Internship Studies  (1-3 Credit Hours)  

Internships in anthropology are available to qualified juniors and seniors on a limited basis for individual projects conducted in association with various private firms, public and private organizations, or governmental institutions in New Orleans. Students will work under professional supervision at these sites, and consult with a faculty sponsor. Requirements include a written report on the experience, and an evaluation by the supervisor.

ANTH 4570  Internship  (1-3 Credit Hours)  

Internships in anthropology are available to qualified juniors and seniors on a limited basis for individual projects conducted in association with various private firms, public and private organizations, or governmental institutions in New Orleans. Students will work under professional supervision at these sites, and consult with a faculty sponsor. Requirements include a written report on the experience, and an evaluation by the supervisor.

ANTH 4610  Ceramic Analysis  (3 Credit Hours)  

A laboratory course dealing with the descriptive analysis of archaeological ceramics. Introduction to aspects of ceramic technology, classification, description, and the use of ceramics in archaeological research. Emphasis will be on practical methods and techniques for analyzing, describing, reporting, and graphically representing ceramic artifacts.

ANTH 4620  Lithic Analysis  (3 Credit Hours)  

A laboratory course dealing with the technological analysis of lithic artifacts. Introduction to fracture mechanics and flint napping, debitage analysis and classification. Application of principles and methods of technological classification, description, and graphical representation to archaeological specimens and modern replicates.

ANTH 4890  Service Learning: ANTH 4950  (0-1 Credit Hours)  

Service Learning.

ANTH 4891  Service Learning: ANTH 4960  (0-1 Credit Hours)  

Service Learning.

ANTH 4910  Independent Study  (1-3 Credit Hours)  

By arrangement.

ANTH 4920  Independent Study  (1-3 Credit Hours)  

By arrangement.

ANTH 4930  Languages of Louisiana  (3 Credit Hours)  

Examines the current and historical linguistic situation in Louisiana, from indigenous languages spoken at the time of contact with Europeans to the present. Covers basic features of the languages as well as their social settings. Students will further conduct independent field research projects, alone or in small groups, focusing on languages spoken in southern Louisiana, in particular in the city of New Orleans.

ANTH 4940  Transfer Coursework  (3 Credit Hours)  

Transfer Coursework.

ANTH 4950  Special Projects  (3 Credit Hours)  

By arrangement.

ANTH 4960  Special Projects  (3 Credit Hours)  

By arrangement.

ANTH 4990  Honors Thesis  (3 Credit Hours)  

Honors Thesis.

ANTH 5000  Honors Thesis  (4 Credit Hours)  

Honors Thesis

ANTH 5190  Semester Abroad  (1-20 Credit Hours)  

Semester Abroad.

ANTH 5370  Washington Semester  (1-20 Credit Hours)  

Washington Semester.

ANTH 5380  Junior Year Abroad  (1-20 Credit Hours)  

Junior Year Abroad.

ANTH 5390  Junior Year Abroad  (1-20 Credit Hours)  

Junior Year Abroad.

ANTH 5940  Transfer Coursework  (0 Credit Hours)  

Transfer Coursework.

ANTH 6010  Quantitative Methods in ANTH  (3 Credit Hours)  

An introduction to mathematical methods relevant to anthropology.

ANTH 6020  The Neandertal Enigma  (3 Credit Hours)  

The Neandertals are the best-understood group of non-modern fossil hominids, having been known to science since 1856. Yet even today they inspire many provocative questions. Who were the Neandertals? How were they different from us? Did they have language? How and why did they disappear? Were they our ancestors, or did our ancestors out compete them? And if the Neandertals were not our ancestors, then who were? These are some of the questions we will explore in this class on the classic cavemen"."

ANTH 6050  North American Indians  (3 Credit Hours)  

Native North American cultures from the time of European contact to the 20th century. Cultural variation from the Arctic to northern Mexico and the adjustments to modern life.

ANTH 6060  South American Indians  (3 Credit Hours)  

Ethnology of the indigenous peoples of lowland South America and adjacent southern Central America. The course examines cultural developments from prehistory to the present. Models for the classification of indigenous cultures, societies, and languages are critically reviewed.

ANTH 6090  Selected Cultural Systms  (3 Credit Hours)  

Selected Cultural Systems.

ANTH 6091  Selected Cultural Systems  (3 Credit Hours)  

Selected Cultural Systems.

ANTH 6092  Selected Cultural Systems  (3 Credit Hours)  

Selected Cultural Systems.

ANTH 6093  Selected Cultural Systems  (3 Credit Hours)  

Selected Cultural Systems.

ANTH 6094  Selected Cultural Systems  (3 Credit Hours)  

Selected Cultural Systems.

ANTH 6095  Selected Cultural Systems  (3 Credit Hours)  

Selected Cultural Systems.

ANTH 6096  Selected Cultural Systems  (3,4 Credit Hours)  

Selected Cultural Systems.

ANTH 6097  Selected Cultural Systems  (3 Credit Hours)  

Selected Cultural Systems.

ANTH 6100  South American Archaeology  (3 Credit Hours)  

Survey of South American archaeology with primary focus on the Andean area. Overview of culture history from the Paleoindian period through the Spanish conquest.

ANTH 6120  Anth of Sex & Reproductn  (3 Credit Hours)  

An exploration of the interrelatedness of biological, behavioral, cultural, social, and political aspects of human sex and reproduction. Current issues, such as new reproductive technologies, the biology and culture of pregnancy and childbirth, mate choice, will be examined from within an evolutionary framework and/or using a cross-cultural approach.

ANTH 6130  Southeast U.S. Prehistory  (3 Credit Hours)  

Survey of the various problems of archaeology of the Southeastern United States.

ANTH 6140  Primate Behavior Biology  (3,4 Credit Hours)  

This course will familiarize students with the Order Primates, with an emphasis on the rules" of and constraints on nonhuman primate social structure

ANTH 6210  Devel of Anth Theory  (3 Credit Hours)  

Origin and development of anthropology since the Renaissance.

ANTH 6220  Material Culture  (3 Credit Hours)  

This course considers how objects embody social relationships and cultural meanings from a variety of perspectives. The major goal of the course is to enhance our understanding of the diversity of people's engagement with the material world to shape social relations. This course is also an attempt to re-connect sub-disciplines of anthropology (socio-cultural anthropology, archaeology, physical anthropology, and linguistics) and to build a general anthropology" of material culture. The course is also relevant to students in related disciplines such as art history

ANTH 6230  Archaeological Theory  (3 Credit Hours)  

An introduction to theoretical basis of modern archaeology. The implications of theory for excavation, analysis, and interpretation.

ANTH 6240  Tech Analysis For Archaeology  (3 Credit Hours)  

A survey of scientific analytic techniques that have been adapted for application to common archaeological problems such as site discovery, dating, site formation processes, artifact source and function, and subsistence and diet. Examination of methodological literature and case studies.

ANTH 6250  Old World Paleolithc Pre  (3 Credit Hours)  

This course offers a synthetic review of the archaeological prehistory and biological evolution of our species. The course examines topics in paleoanthropology ranging from the ancestors of australopithecines in the Miocene to the emergence of complex hunter-gatherer societies at the end of Pleistocene.

ANTH 6260  Highland Mex Prehistory  (3 Credit Hours)  

Patterns and processes of cultural development in the highlands of central Mexico, western Mexico, and Oaxaca as known from archaeological and ethnohistorical data. Early cultures, Toltecs, Aztecs, Mixtecs, Zapotecs.

ANTH 6270  Culture & Romantic Love  (3 Credit Hours)  

Comparative study of romantic love with a focus on non-Western societies. Topics include the debate over the universality of romantic love; cultural delineations, evaluations, and expressions of passionate love, companionate love, and sexual desire; socio-cultural regulations of love, sex, marriage, and non-heterosexual intimacy; romantic love, social change, and globalization.

ANTH 6320  Social Structure  (3 Credit Hours)  

History of the development of the structural/functional paradigm in social anthropology. Diachronic versus synchronic models, statistical versus normative models, decision models, networks, psychological reductionism.

ANTH 6340  Medical Anthropology  (3 Credit Hours)  

Survey of the relationships among disease, curing, culture and environment. Topics include problems of adapting modern medicines to diverse cultures; explication of the social and cultural correlates of physical and mental health and disease (social epidemiology); cross-cultural variation in disease concepts, medical practices, role of patients, and mental health; health and nutritional implications of planned culture change; contributions of anthropology to health-policy decisions of development organizations.

ANTH 6350  Culture and Religion  (3 Credit Hours)  

Religions, ideas, ritual, and organization of primitive peoples; nativistic and messianic movements; function of religion in social systems.

ANTH 6385  Cultural Creolization  (3 Credit Hours)  

Overview of theory and ethnography of current and historic processes of sociocultural contact and comingling primarily in the New World African-European-Indigenous societies that result in emergent shared group identifications. The course examines how creolization allows for cultural continuity and creativity in such new social orders where a Creole language and/or identity may be formed. Admission: anthropology and linguistics majors at level of Jr. or above; graduate students; others by permission of instructor

ANTH 6395  Cultures of NO/Fr La  (3 Credit Hours)  

This course focuses on symbolic meaning in the vernacular expressive culture or folkloric forms of community groups in New Orleans, French Louisiana, the Gulf South region and selected out migrant locations. It addresses differential identities of tribal, ethnic, regional, religious, linguistic, occupational, class and gender affiliations--and examines aesthetic forms as a primary means to do so. Some of these are largely intangible such as music and dance, ritual and festival, narrative and jokes; others are tangible or material culture to varying degrees such as the built environment (houses, boats, landscape use), crafts, costumes and cuisine. All are examined via ethnographic and historical writing, oral histories and documentary media as to how shared cultural knowledge is performed in an array of contexts. These include dancehalls, Carnival parades, second lines, work settings, festivals, neighborhood museums, sacred spaces and so on.

ANTH 6400  Language and Culture  (3 Credit Hours)  

Acquiring and using techniques of conducting linguistic field work. Investigation of one or more languages by working with native speakers. Emphasis on defining problems, developing and testing hypotheses.

ANTH 6415  Pidgins and Creoles  (3 Credit Hours)  

An overview of the world's pidgin and creole languages and a survey of the theories of their origins. Capstone in Linguistics and Anthropology.

ANTH 6420  Linguistic Field Methods  (3 Credit Hours)  

Acquiring and using techniques for conducting linguistic field work. Investigation of one or more languages by working with native speakers. Emphasis on defining problems, developing and testing hypotheses.

ANTH 6430  Archaeol Culturl Landscp  (3 Credit Hours)  

Landscapes are outcomes of natural and cultural activity.  Natural landscapes are formed by geological processes and climatic patterns.  Cultural landscapes are shaped by the intentional and unintentional effects of human activity on the environment.  The archaeological study of cultural landscapes, therefore, concerns both the social and symbolic dimensions of local and regional environments as well as anthropogenic effects on environments at local, regional, and global scales.  Archaeologists interested in cultural landscapes study features such as earthen mounds, embankments, monumental architecture, ritual places and cemeteries, the built environment of human settlements, canals, ditches, fields, and signs of human impacts on natural environments.  Archaeologists typically study specific sites, but the archaeological study of landscapes emphasizes the significance of specific sites within broader regional contexts.  An archaeological perspective benefits the study of landscapes because archaeologists are inherently interested in the effects of both long-term trends and short-term changes on the ways that groups of people interact with each other and with their environment.  In this course, emphasis is placed on selected case studies from Europe, the North Atlantic, the South Pacific, and the Americas, although selected comparative cases and examples shall also be drawn from Africa and Asia.

ANTH 6435  Diasters and Past Societies  (3 Credit Hours)  

Consideration of case studies in how past societies have prepared for or responded to disasters, critical reflection on "natural" and "cultural" forces that contribute to catastrophic events and that shape the aftermath of disasters, comparative assessment of relationships between culture and environment, and application of resilience theory and models of cultural collapse towards understanding the effects of disasters on past societies.

ANTH 6480  Human Functional Morph  (3 Credit Hours)  

This course covers the functional anatomy of the human body, with emphasis on the structure, function, evolution, and development of the musculo-skeletal and nervous systems. The principle of biological uniformitarianism is used to correlate hard tissue (i.e., teeth and bone) structure with soft tissue function, since soft tissues are only rarely recovered in archaeological or paleontological settings.

ANTH 6500  Human Evolution  (3 Credit Hours)  

An investigation into the evolution of modern Homo sapiens (italics) over the last ten million years. Emphasis will be placed on the fossil record of human and nonhuman primates, the role of changing environments, and migration patterns. Models from technologically simple cultures and modern nonhuman primates will be included in the consideration of developing social organizations.

ANTH 6510  Ethnicity, Nationalism  (3 Credit Hours)  

Theoretical and ethnographic examinations of race, ethnicity, and nationalism. Topics also include multiculturalism, globalization, and diasporas.

ANTH 6520  Ethnographic Methods  (3 Credit Hours)  

Theory and techniques involved in collecting, analyzing, and reporting ethnographic data. Validity, reliability, and precision of participant observation: probes and free lists; sampling frames and types of samples appropriate to the unit of analysis; surveys and questionnaires; selection of key informants; interdisciplinary methods; research design. Consideration of ethical issues, potential conflicts of interest, and university review board procedures and policies. Classroom exercises and field projects.

ANTH 6700  Spoken Nahuatl  (3 Credit Hours)  

The essentials of Nahuatl phonology, morphology, and syntax. Conversational practice and laboratory sessions along with emphasis on linguistic analysis of the language.

ANTH 6710  Hist Ecology of Amazonia  (3 Credit Hours)  

Interactions between local peoples and Amazonian landscapes from prehistory to the present. Amazonian landscapes as an analytic unit will be examined from the interdisciplinary perspective of historical ecology. Changes and development of forests and savannas since the arrival of human beings. Historical, ecological, cultural forces involved in biological and edaphic diversity in modern forests. Long-term effects of prehistoric and historic human occupations and manipulation of landscapes. Implications for conservation and development.

ANTH 6720  Spoken Yoruba  (3 Credit Hours)  

This course provides an introduction to the Yoruba language. Emphasis on grammar and vocabulary development, listening, speaking, reading, and writing skills. Practice in oral discussion will be enhanced by weekly dramatical presentations, poetry recitals, and story-telling.

ANTH 6745  Bioarchaeology of Mummies  (3 Credit Hours)  

Mummified human remains open a fragile window into the past. They provide unique information about the physical characteristics, health and diet of ancient peoples, as well as information on cultural modification of the body (head shaping, piercing, tattooing, hair styles), funerary practices, and cultural concepts of death and the afterlife. Mummies can be investigated from various perspectives (textual, iconographic, biomedical, ethnographical, archaeological), but are studied most effectively using a multidisciplinary approach involving archaeologists, biological anthropologists, conservators, and specialists in medical imaging, paleogenetics and geochemistry. Bioarchaeology, the application of biological anthropology to archaeological research questions, is a term commonly used today to describe this multidisciplinary approach to studying the dead. This course will examine preserved human bodies from around the world, with an emphasis on scientific studies that seek to reconstruct their life histories and postmortem treatment.

ANTH 6800  Spoken Yucatecan Maya  (3 Credit Hours)  

The essentials of Yucatecan Maya phonology, morphology, and syntax. Oral/aural exercises and conversational practice with a native speaker.

ANTH 6810  Int Mayan Hieroglyphics  (3 Credit Hours)  

A survey of present knowledge about the nature of the pre-Columbian Maya writing system, including calendrical notation, astronomical calculations, the structure and content of phoneticism, and its relationship to other Mesoamerican writing systems.

ANTH 6820  Classical Yucatecan Maya  (3 Credit Hours)  

Morphology and syntax of Classical Yucatecan Maya. Palaeography and translation of Colonial Maya documents representing the following genres: land surveys and transfers, wills, official complaints, divinatory and/or prophetic texts.

ANTH 6840  Beginning Kaqchikel Lang  (3 Credit Hours)  

Kaqchikel is one of the four largest Mayan groups in Guatemala, having over a million self-identified members, about half of whom speak their native mother tongue. Taught in three Kaqchikel communities in Guatemala, this six week course enables students to achieve conversational fluency and elementary reading/writing skills.

ANTH 6845  Beginning K'iche' Language  (3 Credit Hours)  

K’iche’ is the largest Mayan language spoken in Guatemala, with about 2.5 million speakers. Situated in Highland Guatemala, it is second only to Spanish in number of speakers. This six week summer course is taught primarily in Nahualá, a town of about 90,000 in the Department of Sololá. Students acquire basic oral and written proficiency in the language.

ANTH 6850  Intermediate K'iche' Language  (3 Credit Hours)  

K’iche’ is the largest Mayan language spoken in Guatemala, with about 2.5 million speakers. Situated in Highland Guatemala, it is second only to Spanish in number of speakers. This six week summer course is taught primarily in Nahualá, a town of about 90,000 in the Department of Sololá. Students acquire basic oral and written proficiency in the language.

Prerequisite(s): ANTH 6845.

ANTH 6855  Advanced K'iche' Language  (3 Credit Hours)  

K’iche’ is the largest Mayan language spoken in Guatemala, with about 2.5 million speakers. Situated in Highland Guatemala, it is second only to Spanish in number of speakers. This six week summer course is taught primarily in Nahualá, a town of about 90,000 in the Department of Sololá. Students acquire basic oral and written proficiency in the language.

Prerequisite(s): ANTH 6850.

ANTH 6860  Intro to K'iche' Culture  (3 Credit Hours)  

This course in an introduction to K’iche’ (Maya) culture for students participating in the Mayan Language Institute realized in Guatemala in the municipalities of Antigua and Nahualá. The course will cover basic issues in K’iche’ culture and society and present hands-on workshops dealing with specific aspects of the culture. Topics will include kinship patterns and relationships, social interactions, gender roles, religious practices, arts and crafts, and economic structures. Students will have direct experience learning about K’iche’ cuisine, milpa agriculture, weaving, religious ceremonies, calendrical practices, and ceremonial and ritual observances. In addition, students will study examples of contemporary art, music, and literature, including the work of K’iche’ poets such as Humberto Ak’abal and Pablo Garcia.

ANTH 6870  Kaqchikel Maya Culture  (3 Credit Hours)  

Contemporary culture practices of the Kaqchikel in four communities of Guatemala will be examined as exemplary of the processes of cultural revitalization, integration into national and local political arenas, participation in world markets, and interaction with world religions. Culture practitioners will participate as facilitators and guest speakers.

ANTH 6890  Service Learning: ANTH 6097  (0-1 Credit Hours)  

Service Learning.

ANTH 7010  Readings  (3 Credit Hours)  

Readings.

ANTH 7020  Readings  (3 Credit Hours)  

ANTH 7031  Special Readings  (1-3 Credit Hours)  

ANTH 7032  Special Readings  (1-3 Credit Hours)  

ANTH 7033  Special Readings  (1-3 Credit Hours)  

ANTH 7040  Special Readings  (1-3 Credit Hours)  

Special Readings.

ANTH 7041  Special Readings  (1-3 Credit Hours)  

Special Readings.

ANTH 7042  Special Readings  (1-3 Credit Hours)  

Special Readings.

ANTH 7043  Special Readings  (1-3 Credit Hours)  

Special Readings.

ANTH 7090  Selected Cultural Systms  (3 Credit Hours)  

Selected Cultural Systems.

ANTH 7091  Selected Cultural Systems  (3 Credit Hours)  

Selected Cultural Systems.

ANTH 7092  Selected Cultural Systems  (3 Credit Hours)  

Selected Cultural Systems.

ANTH 7093  Selected Cultural Systems  (3 Credit Hours)  

Selected Cultural Systems.

ANTH 7094  Selected Cultural Systems  (3 Credit Hours)  

Selected Cultural Systems.

ANTH 7095  Selected Cutural Systems  (3 Credit Hours)  

Selected Cultural Systems.

ANTH 7096  Selected Cultural Systems  (3 Credit Hours)  

Selected Cultural Systems.

ANTH 7097  Selected Cultural Systems  (3 Credit Hours)  

Selected Cultural Systems.

ANTH 7098  Selected Cutural Systems  (3 Credit Hours)  

Selected Cultural Systems.

ANTH 7099  Selected Cultural Systems  (3 Credit Hours)  

Selected Cultural Systems.

ANTH 7110  Cultrs Sub-Saharn Africa  (3 Credit Hours)  

A survey of the cultures of sub-Saharan Africa from the time of European contact to the present. A detailed study of selected African cultures, identifying, and explaining cultural diversity and unity of African cultures, and comparing African cultures with cultures of other geographic areas. Inequality, development, the family, gender roles, kinship systems, and world view are considered.

ANTH 7120  Conquest & Colonialism  (3 Credit Hours)  

Comparative and global perspectives on the archaeology of culture contact and colonialism.

ANTH 7130  North American Prehistory  (3 Credit Hours)  

A survey of the archaeology of Canada and the United States from the appearance of man in the New World to the arrival of the Europeans.

ANTH 7150  Prehistory of Africa  (3 Credit Hours)  

Survey of African prehistory from the earliest tool-makers (Olduvai Gorge, etc.) to protohistoric times. Emphasis on Africa south of the Sahara for later prehistory. Africa's role in human origins, development and spread of food-producing economies, the African Iron Age, early contacts with Arabic and European peoples.

ANTH 7170  Seminar In Archaeology  (3 Credit Hours)  

Graduate seminar on selected topics of contemporary interest and emphasis in anthropological archaeology. Offered irregularly. Seminar topics identified by archaeology faculty members.

ANTH 7180  Adv Middle American Arch  (3 Credit Hours)  

Graduate seminar on selected topics of contemporary interest and emphasis in Middle American archaeology. Offered irregularly. Seminar topics identified by archaeology faculty members.

ANTH 7190  Economic Anthropology  (3 Credit Hours)  

The study of economic behavior in band, tribal, and peasant societies. Emphasis on the impact of culture and environment on economic decision-making in the Third World. Competing theoretical approaches, particularly evolutionary, ecological, substantivist and Marxist are critically reviewed.

ANTH 7230  Research Dsgn &Grant Wrt  (3 Credit Hours)  

This seminar for advanced graduate students considers strategies for designing and conducting theoretically driven research in anthropology, and it considers the principal characteristics of major paradigms and theoretical perspectives that shape anthropology in its contemporary forms. Designing research plans and making linkages between theory, strategies of inquiry, specific methodologies, and empirical datasets is both challenging and rewarding, and research design can take considerable amounts of time and effort. Crafting research proposals can also be both challenging and rewarding, especially given the need to communicate research plans to specialists in particular disciplines and proposal reviewers from fields of study and practice other than our own. Each student in this course will develop theoretical perspectives and methodological approaches that form the basis for the research she or he plans to conduct as a dissertation project. Each student will write a draft a proposal for dissertation research. Some discussion throughout the course will be devoted to professional development and to specific funding programs that support doctoral and postdoctoral research in anthropology and related fields of study.

ANTH 7250  Selected Research Topics  (3 Credit Hours)  

Selected Research Topics.

ANTH 7260  Prehist U.S. Southwest  (3 Credit Hours)  

This course looks at the development of prehistoric and early historic cultures of the U.S. Southwest. Both archaeological and early historical evidence of indigenous peoples and early explorers will be examined.

ANTH 7270  Roots of Western Civilization  (3 Credit Hours)  

Cultural history of Southwestern Asia and Europe from the Mesolithic, through the development of food production, to the beginnings of civilization. Emphasis upon the beginnings of complex societies and urban life and their early, pre-Roman development in Europe.

ANTH 7290  Linguistic Analysis  (3 Credit Hours)  

Language as a reflection of the human mind and the role of language in defining the essence of humanity. Language and the expression of social values. Emphasis on analysis of primary linguistic data. Critical examination of theories of linguistic structure.

ANTH 7300  History of Writing  (3 Credit Hours)  

This course looks at the different systems of writing which have been used in various cultures through time with attention to the materials and purpose in relation to the cultures. Orientation to and practice in decipherment are included. Finally, the issues of modern script development are introduced.

ANTH 7310  Prehistory of Languages  (3 Credit Hours)  

Historical Linguistics traces language change over time. Reconstruction through comparative method and internal paradigm examination is used to retro-project earlier stages of a language or a language family, elucidating interrelationships among languages, paths of migration, spheres of influence, and varieties of contact. Reconstructed vocabulary yields inferences about ancient homelands, social organization, and culture constructs. The processes observed in language change yield insights into human cognition and the language faculty.

ANTH 7320  Archaeology of Gender  (3 Credit Hours)  

Gender refers to the cultural norms, ideals, expectations, and rules that shape the relationships and activities of men, women, and children. People in the present and recent past have conceptualized gender in many different ways, and there is great diversity in the range of gender roles and gender relations seen in different cultures. With ethnographic and historic evidence as interpretive guides, archaeologists can offer insights into the nature of gender roles and gender relations in past societies, and into the ways that gender norms have contributed to major trends in the history and prehistory of humankind. This course is an introduction to the archaeological study of the roles of men, women, and children in past societies; the relationships among women, men, and children in past communities; and the ideologies that have legitimized and naturalized those gender roles and gender relations. Case studies covered in the course are drawn from the archaeology of the Americas, Africa, Asia, and Europe.

ANTH 7330  Anthropology of Gender  (3 Credit Hours)  

Introduction to forensic anthropology, a subdiscipline of physical anthropology concerned with the identification of human skeletal remains in medico-legal contexts. Surveys the history of the field and the techniques used to determine age, sex, and physical characteristics of an individual from skeletonized remains, as well as methods used for positive identification, estimating time since death, and determining cause and manner of death.

ANTH 7340  Dialectology  (3 Credit Hours)  

Introduction to language variation both geographically and socially. The course looks at the history and methods of dialectology as well as the ways speakers demonstrate identity through speech patterns.

ANTH 7360  Anthropology of Cities  (3 Credit Hours)  

This course focuses on anthropological approaches to cities and urban life. Topics include the cultural meanings of public space and the built environment, processes of social differentiation and class formation, the role of capital, and the emergence of social movements. The second half of the course is organized around a comparison of four ethnographic case-studies of cities outside the United States and Europe. Throughout the semester, studies will also discuss how anthropological approaches may be applied to New Orleans.

ANTH 7370  Locating Southeast Asia  (3 Credit Hours)  

This course examines contemporary Southeast Asia. As one of the most diverse regions in the world, the region confounds easy characterization. The first part of the course provides students with a broad overview of the social, cultural, and political institutions of the region with a focus on Indonesia, Thailand, the Philippines, and Vietnam. The second part turns to contemporary issues including political and economic development, religious change, and cultural constructions of identity. Readings include academic essays, short stories, and full-length ethnographies.

ANTH 7400  Language & Culture  (3 Credit Hours)  

Acquiring and using techniques of conducting linguistic field work. Investigation of one or more languages by working with native speakers. Emphasis on defining problems, developing and testing hypotheses.

ANTH 7410  Prehist East Mesoamerica  (3 Credit Hours)  

Examines the development of highly advanced cultures and societies in one of the centers of native American civilization. Although the presentation stresses archaeological data, the course considers pre-Hispanic aesthetic achievements, social organization, values, written records, and adaptation to varying environments.

ANTH 7420  Ling Approaches to Meaning  (3 Credit Hours)  

Semantics is the study of meaning in language. As humans use language they produce meaning in any number of ways: through intonation, through body language, through contextual (in)congruities, and through the linguistic structures used. Semanticians try to limit their study to the last of these, while always aware of other meaning-creating tools. In this course, we begin with the study of logic-based theories of meaning, examining propositional meanings. At each stage in this initial investigation, we will keep in mind how this carefully restricted corpus compares with situated language use. In the second part of the course, we will systematically build in context to approach an understanding of natural semantics, the way human beings mean.

ANTH 7441  Lexicography: Dictionaries  (3 Credit Hours)  

Lexicography is the making of dictionaries. Dictionaries take many forms and fulfill many functions. Dictionaries have evolved new formats; professional lexicographers share word gleaning with internet users. Dictionaries may be monolingual, di-, tri-, or multi-lingual, etymological or encyclopedic, synchronic or diachronic, prescriptive or descriptive, terminological or generic. Dictionary construction requires a number of skills which co-vary with the type of dictionary to be produced. This course provides an overview of dictionaries, their forms, formats and histories, while fostering a basic skill set for harvesting words and compiling lexicons. Dictionaries provide a cognitive map to communities of speakers, both past and present.

ANTH 7450  Meth Observatn Behav Rsh  (3 Credit Hours)  

This course focuses on the development, design, analysis, and presentation of research on behavior using observational methods. While these methods can be used on captive populations (zoo, research center) they are also appropriate for studies of free-ranging animals, including human beings. The student will be exposed to the specific challenges of observational research, and learn appropriate levels of analysis.

ANTH 7470  Many Faces of Islam  (3 Credit Hours)  

Islam is a fundamental human experience in diverse socio-historic and cultural milieux. Ethnographies of Muslim communities highlight the heterogenity of Islamic perspectives and traditions. Focus on culturally situated Islamic practices and belief systems fosters a critical understanding of the emergent Islamic identities and their historico-cultural underpinnings.

ANTH 7510  Spec Concepts Human Paleo  (3 Credit Hours)  

The number of proposed fossil hominid/hominin species has mushroomed in recent years yet the recognition of species in the human fossil record remains a daunting task. However, in order to reconstruct the phylogenetic (ancestor-descendent) relationships among humans, our ancestors, and close collateral relatives, we must group hominin fossils into meaningful taxonomic categories, ones that likely reflect truly monophyletic (shared common ancestor) descent patterns. This course explores different evolutionary species concepts and their applicability to human paleontology. Current approaches to the reconstruction of phylogenetic relationships are then discussed, and the taxonomic status of hominin species is assessed.

ANTH 7535  Native Amer Lang and Ling  (3 Credit Hours)  

This course will explore the richness of the linguistic diversity still preserved in the Native American languages of this hemisphere. Two thirds of the Native American languages spoken at time of European immigration have perished. Today even languages with large communities of fluent speakers face heavy assimilatory pressures. Language loss and simplification are rapidly changing the wordscape of the Americas.

ANTH 7560  Environmental Archaeology  (3 Credit Hours)  

This course examines the fundamentally important relationship between human behavior and environmental change in the past. It looks at both the ways in which humans have responded to their environmental circumstances and the ways in which human activities have influenced environmental conditions at various scales. The course explores methods for learning about environmental conditions in the past and the nature of human interaction with the environment. The course also presents basic information on some particularly important topics concerning past human/environment interactions, including (1) causes of global climate change, (2) human roles in Pleistocene megafauna, (3) post-Pleistocene adaptation, (4) the origins of agriculture and animal domestication, (5) agricultural landscape modification and environmental over-exploitation, and (6) Holocene changes in human health, including the origins of modern disease epidemics.

ANTH 7570  Intermed Kaqchikel Lang  (3 Credit Hours)  

Kaqchikel is one of the four largest Mayan groups in Guatemala, having over a million self-identified members, about half of whom speak their native mother tongue. Taught in three Kaqchikel communities in Guatemala, this six week course enables students to achieve conversational fluency and elementary reading/writing skills.

ANTH 7580  Adv Kaqchikel Lang  (3 Credit Hours)  

Kaqchikel is one of the four largest Mayan groups in Guatemala, having over a million self-identified members, about half of whom speak their native mother tongue. Taught in three Kaqchikel communities in Guatemala, this six week course enables students to achieve conversational fluency and elementary reading/writing skills.

ANTH 7590  Syntactic Theory  (3 Credit Hours)  

Introduction of transformational generative syntax, with examples from selected areas of English grammar. Formal models in grammatical description. Emphasis on the logic of linguistic argumentation.

ANTH 7610  Ceramic Analysis  (3 Credit Hours)  

A laboratory course dealing with the descriptive analysis of archaeological ceramics. Introduction to aspects of ceramic technology, classification, description, and the use of ceramics in archaeological research. Emphasis will be on practical methods and techniques for analyzing, describing, reporting, and graphically representing ceramic artifacts.

ANTH 7620  Lithic Analysis  (3 Credit Hours)  

A laboratory course dealing with the technological analysis of lithic artifacts. Introduction to fracture mechanics and flint napping, debitage analysis and classification. Application of principles and methods of technological classification, description, and graphical representation to archaeological specimens and modern replicates.

ANTH 7630  Linguistic Phonetics  (3 Credit Hours)  

The course offers an overview of articulatory and acoustic phonetics with emphasis on matching acoustic cues closely with the articulatory gestures. The first part of the course will study the articulatory and acoustic cues to range of English and non-English speech sounds with information about the normal range of variation. The second part will focus on collecting and interpreting acoustic data, and using such data as evidence to solve phonological problems in normal and pathological speech.

ANTH 7640  Phonology  (3 Credit Hours)  

This course provides an introduction to phonological analysis and theory, with strong emphasis on description and analysis of data from a wide variety of languages. Major issues to be addressed include universal principles of human phonological systems, language-specific variation, constraints on representation of rules, the relationship of phonology to morphological and syntactic components of the grammar, and the historical underpinnings of current theoretical models.

ANTH 7650  Morphology  (3 Credit Hours)  

This course provides an introduction to prosodic and non-prosodic morphology with emphasis on data analysis and argumentation. With data from a variety of languages, the first part of the course will examine non-prosodic morphological processes to highlight the typology of word structure across languages. The second part will examine morphological processes conditioned by prosody, and consider the various frameworks for analyzing the data; eventually, the course will work toward a dormal model like that of McCarth and Prince's "Theory of Prosodic Morphology". The main objectives of the course are: (1) to learn to analyze morphological data; (2) to learn to compare alternative analysis for a given set of data and to find evidence to choose between the alternative, and (3) to learn to present linguistic analysis and argumentation in a coherent essay.

ANTH 7660  Discourse Analysis  (3 Credit Hours)  

Study of written and spoken texts from a variety of languages and language use contexts. Focus on structural aspects of language (noun phrase construction and anaphora, topicalization, focus constructions, word order, deictics, and definite reference) as they relate to the situated use of language.

ANTH 7670  Language & Acquisition  (3 Credit Hours)  

This course provides an introduction to issues such as the genetic basis of language ability and acquisition; neurological aspects of linguistic knowledge; first language acquisition; childhood bilingualism; language acquisition in special populations (deaf children, blind children, children with mental retardation, children with autism and children with specific language impairment). Emphasis will be on child language data collection, description, and analysis.

ANTH 7680  Language and Power  (3 Credit Hours)  

Exploration of the ways that language indexes, reflects, and constructs power. Cross-cultural study of the interrelationship of social ascriptions, attitudes toward groups and their members, and the speech patterns of in-group/out-group members. Examination of the manipulation of power and its linguistic correlates in the domains of medicine, the media, education, and the law. Effects of language policy, especially officialization and standardization, on speakers of minority languages or codes.

ANTH 7690  Language and Gender  (3 Credit Hours)  

An exploration of the structures of language, phonological, morphological, syntactic, semantic, and pragmatic, as they index, inter-relate with, and construct gender identities cross-culturally.

ANTH 7700  Ecological Anthropology  (3 Credit Hours)  

Critically reviews case studies of ecosystemic and energetic relations between human populations, cultures, and the environment in diverse ethnographic settings of the world, such as Amazonia, the Great Basin, New Guinea, and Southeast Asia. Examines the historical emergence of ecological paradigms in anthropology. Compares the modern contributions of cultural ecology, evolutionary ecology, ethnoecology, and historical ecology. Evaluates potential contributions of ecological anthropology to general ecology.

ANTH 7720  Bioanthro Modern Humans  (3 Credit Hours)  

Biological adaptations of living human populations to their environments, and the interaction of these adaptations with cultural patterns. Relationships of body size, form, and composition to climatic and nutritional factors in various geographical groups of modern man. Major adaptive problems facing the human species are discussed and implications for the future explored.

ANTH 7730  Forensic Anthropology  (3 Credit Hours)  

Introduction to forensic anthropology, a subdiscipline of physical anthropology concerned with the identification of human skeletal remains in medico-legal contexts. Surveys the history of the field and the techniques used to determine age, sex, and physical characteristics of an individual from skeletonized remains, as well as methods used for positive identification, estimating time since death, and determining cause and manner of death.

ANTH 7735  Bioarcheol of Human Sacrifice  (3 Credit Hours)  

This course will examine the literary, archaeological, and skeletal evidence of human sacrifice in past societies. It will critically review written accounts and physical evidence of the offering of human lives in ritual contexts, with a focus on archaeological sites that show convincing evidence of such activities. Case studies will be used to explore the question of why human lives were offered in particular places and times, while critically evaluating the evidence used to document and interpret such practices. 

ANTH 7750  Human Paleopathology  (3 Credit Hours)  

Survey of the field of paleopathology, the study of health and disease in ancient populations. Topics include methods for identifying evidence of injury and disease in bones, teeth, and mummified tissue; ancient medicine and surgery; chemical approaches to reconstructing diet; and human health trends through time.

ANTH 7780  Language Death  (3 Credit Hours)  

Every fortnight a human language dies. Half the languages spoken in the Western Hemisphere at the turn of the 19th century have died. This course examines the forces that lead to language death, strategies that speakers whose linguistic heritage is endangered may deploy to revitalize their languages, and tools that linguists have used to preserve the knowledges of human speech communities.

ANTH 7850  The Four-Field Model  (3 Credit Hours)  

Philosophical underpinnings of general anthropology. Epistemological ramifications of four anthropological fields (subdisciplines) as complete coverage of the subject matter. Contingency vs. rationale in the amalgamation of the four fields, as distinctive and definitive of the holistic study of Homosapiens. Initial development of the model in the British Isles; institutionalization in 20th century North America. Connections to study of natives of the New World and salvage ethnography. Growth and specialization in subdisciplines. Debates over the logic and practicality in continuing cohesion of the model.

ANTH 7888  Writing Intensive: ANTH 7630  (1 Credit Hour)  

Writing Intensive.

ANTH 7890  Service Learning:  (0-1 Credit Hours)  

Service Learning.

ANTH 7930  Languages of Louisiana  (3 Credit Hours)  

Examines the current and historical linguistic situation in Louisiana, from indigenous languages spoken at the time of contact with Europeans to the present. Covers basic features of the languages as well as their social settings. Students will further conduct independent field research projects, alone or in small groups, focusing on languages spoken in southern Louisiana, in particular in the city of New Orleans.

ANTH 7950  Special Projects  (3 Credit Hours)  

Special Projects.

ANTH 7960  Special Projects  (3 Credit Hours)  

Special Projects.

ANTH 7961  Special Projects  (3 Credit Hours)  

Special Projects.

ANTH 9980  Masters Research  (0 Credit Hours)  

Masters Research.

ANTH 9990  Dissertation Research  (0 Credit Hours)  

Dissertation Research