School of Continuing Studies

Administration

 
Richard A. Marksbury, Dean of the School of Continuing Studies
 

Academic Advisers

 
Natalie Seither, Senior Academic Adviser
Paul A. Greenberg, Media Arts
Sharyn Orr, Senior Academic Adviser
Ronna Burger, Master of Liberal Arts
Chastian Taurman III, Business Studies
Sallie E. Davis, Paralegal Studies
Karen Delzell-Lucas , Casino Resort Studies
Keith Amacker, Homeland Security Studies
Lisa Hammons, Senior Academic Adviser
Kim Black, Academic Adviser
 

Program Administration

 
Terrence W. Fitzmorris, Associate Dean
Jake Calamusa, Information Specialist/Adviser to Student Government
Monica Caminita, Project Assistant, Elmwood Campus
Edna Hoff, Executive Secretary to the Associate Dean
Donald Cooper, Media/Communication Specialist
Paul Forbes, Director, Professional Development Institute, Elmwood Campus
Judie Graham, Secretary to the Director of Paralegal Studies and Director of Applied Computing Systems and Technology
Rosaria Guastella, Assistant Dean, Enrollment Development
Paul A. Greenberg, Director, Media Arts James Kwiatkowski, Systems Analyst
Barbara Cambre, Project Assistant, Elmwood Campus
Gaye LeMon, Supervisor of Records
R. Thomas Kambur, Project Assistant, Uptown Campus
Jan O’Rorke, Project Assistant
Irvin Schwartz, Information Technology Specialist
Chastian Taurman, III, Director, Business Studies
Jenifer F. Thiel, Senior Executive Assistant to the Dean
Celeste Uzee, Special Assistant to the Dean
Sallie E. Davis, Director, Paralegal Studies
Suni Vaz, Project Assistant, Elmwood
 

School of Continuing Studies-Biloxi, Mississippi Campus

 
Karen Delzell-Lucas, Assistant Dean
Karen Delzel-Lucas, Director, Casino Resort Management Program
Elliott Voivedich, Recruiter
Greg Fletcher, Project Assistant
Patricia Oates, Executive Secretary
Barbara White, Project Assistant
 

 School of Continuing Studies-Madison, Mississippi Campus

Sherry M. Chance, Director
Elizabeth Trotter
William
 

Professors of Practice

 
Carrie Schwartz
Kay McLennan
Lance B. Green
Karen Delzell-Lucas


The School of Continuing Studies offers bachelor and associate degree, certificate, and professional development programs to meet the educational needs of the Greater New Orleans and Mississippi communities. The School of Continuing Studies shares the traditions of Tulane University and extends the commitments and resources of a university founded in 1834 to an extensive and diverse student body. Courses are designed for the needs of adults returning for part-time study, for employed persons improving their skills through professional development and seminars, and for traditional full-time and part-time college students recently graduated from high school. Special programs are also available for pre-college students.

Tulane’s traditions of part-time education date from the university’s founding. In 1888, University President William Preston Johnston established a threefold objective for Tulane: the education of youth, community-oriented adult education, and the advancement of knowledge through research. In 1942, largely through the efforts of Roger P. McCutcheon, dean of the Graduate School, University College was established: so named because its offerings cut across the university’s many academic fields. In 2006, University College was renamed the School of Continuing Studies.

The School of Continuing Studies offices are located in Gibson Hall on Tulane University’s uptown campus but the School also makes its programs available at campuses in Harahan at the Elmwood Campus and in Biloxi at the Mississippi Coast Campus in Edgewater Mall, and Madison Campus at Madison, Mississippi. 

The School of Continuing Studies curricula are designed to fill the needs of its distinctive population. Offerings include:

Part-time students may take from five years to eight years to complete a bachelor’s degree, but with planning, part-time students may complete a bachelor’s degree in as few as four years by enrolling in four courses each semester and in two courses each summer.

The "Trimester" System

The School of Continuing Studies features three terms during the year–fall, spring, and summer–with approximately the same number of courses offered in each “trimester.” The summer “trimester” includes 12-week sessions and several six-week sessions, offered on the main campus and at campuses at Elmwood and on the Mississippi Coast.

Programs of Study

One of the school’s greatest strengths is the diversity of its academic offerings and the flexibility with which students may approach them. Students may pursue a degree with a major offered by continuing studies or they may work toward a major offered through another undergraduate division of the university. Students who already have a bachelor’s degree or who do not want to make the long-term commitment to a degree in arts and sciences may choose to earn a certificate in one of the specialty programs offered by continuing studies. Students may also prepare to transfer to a degree program at another school at the university or take miscellaneous courses that suit their personal interests or professional needs.

Bachelor Degree Programs

Bachelor of Arts

Bachelor of Science

Bachelor of Fine Arts

Master Degree Program

Associate Degree Programs

Minors

Postbaccalaureate Certificate Programs

Certificates of Completion

Special Programs

Where to Write or Call:

School of Continuing Studies
125 Gibson Hall
Tulane University
New Orleans 70118
504-865-5555
Fax: 504-865-5562

Career Services

Director, Career Services Center
Diboll Complex
504-865-5107

Education Resources and Counseling

Mechanical Engineering Building
504-865-5113

Elmwood Campus

800 East Commerce Road, Suite 100
Harahan, LA 70123
504-865-5333
Fax: 504-733-7947

Financial Aid

Director of Financial Aid
Mechanical Engineering Building, 2nd floor
504-865-5723

Housing

Director of Housing
Irby House
504-865-5724

Mississippi Coast Campus

2600 Beach Boulevard, Suite 18
Biloxi, MS 39531
228-388-5769
Fax: 228-388-6323

Parking, Traffic and Security

Diboll Center
504-865-5424

Professional and Technical Programs

Elmwood Campus
504-865-5333
Fax: 504-773-7947

Recreation

Reily Recreation Center
504-865-5431

Summer School

125 Gibson Hall
865-5555

Transcripts

Registrar: Office
110 Gibson Hall
865-5231

Tutoring

Counseling and Educational Resources
Mechanical Engineering Building
865-5103

General Information

Main Campus

Administrative offices of the School of Continuing Studies are located in Gibson Hall on St. Charles Avenue opposite Audubon Park. Office hours are 8:30 a.m. to 6:30 p.m. Monday through Thursday and 8:30 a.m. to 5 p.m. on Friday. The School of Continuing Studies shares classroom, study, and recreational facilities with the other academic divisions. Call 504-865-5555 or search www.scs.tulane.edu .

Elmwood Campus

The Elmwood campus is located at 800 E. Commerce Rd., Harahan, La., 70123. Office hours are 9 a.m. to 9 p.m. Monday-Thursday, 9 a.m. – 4:30 p.m. on Friday, and 9 a.m. – noon on Saturday. Call 504-865-5333.

Mississippi Coast Campus

The Mississippi Coast Campus is located in the Edgewater Mall, near Keesler Air Force Base, 2600 Beach Boulevard, Biloxi, Miss., 39531. Call 228-388-5769.

Madison Campus

The Madison Campus is located in Madison, Mississippi, 2115 Main Street, Madison, MS  35110.  Call 601-605-0007 from 8:00 a.m. to 5:30 p.m. Monday-Thursday and from 8:30 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. Friday. 

Academic Advising

Academic advising for part-time students is available uptown, by appointment, Monday through Thursday from 9 a.m. to 6 p.m. and on Friday from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m.; students may be able to obtain advising during other times but are encouraged to make an appointment by calling 865-5555. Advising is also provided by appointment at the Elmwood campus from 9:00 a.m. – 7:30 p.m., Monday-Thursday, 9 a.m. – 4 p.m., Friday. For an advising appointment at Elmwood, call 865-5333. Students are urged to maintain regular contact with their adviser in matters relating to academic planning, satisfaction of degree requirements, quality of work rules, and transfer of credit from other institutions.

Student Government

Student government is funded by a mandatory student fee. Part of the income goes to Tulane University student organizations and activities, and part is retained by the School of Continuing Studies Student Government Association. Student activity fees are distributed by the Associated Student Body, which organizes campus activities. The School of Continuing Studies Student Government Association is part of the Graduate and Professional Student Association, and requests its budget from that body.

Students interested in student government should contact the student government adviser at 865-5555.

Alumni Association

All graduates of School of Continuing Studies automatically become members of the Alumni Association. There are no dues. The purpose of the association is to promote the idea of higher education with emphasis on the continuing education of adults and to encourage fellowship among members. Alumni receive School of Continuing Studies’ newsletter to help them keep informed. Contact with the Alumni Association can be made by calling the School of Continuing Studies office at 865-5555.

Admission, Costs, and Transfer Credits

Admission

The School of Continuing Studies has an open admissions policy. Students are not required to submit ACT or SAT tests in order to be admitted but must hold a high school diploma or general equivalent diploma. Continued enrollment is based on satisfactory academic performance.

Students wishing to study part-time through the School of Continuing Studies should obtain an application form and submit it, along with a $25 processing fee, to the office before the beginning of the semester. The $25 application fee is non-refundable. Applications cannot be processed without this fee. Students who have attended college previously and plan to work toward a degree or certificate must contact all former schools and have official transcripts sent directly to the School of Continuing Studies. Students who have not attended college must submit a copy of their high school diploma (or equivalent) with their application.

Students can be admitted conditionally without transcripts, but registration may be canceled if transcripts have not been received by mid-semester. Students desiring to attend the School of Continuing Studies to take miscellaneous courses or to audit courses do not need to submit transcripts of previous college work. Students dismissed from, or on probation at, their last college may be admitted on probation at the discretion of the Academic Performance Committee. Conditions of probation at entry generally include a load limit of seven credits in the first semester. Readmission is generally contingent upon the student earning grades of C or better in all courses taken the first semester.

Interdivisional Transfer

Students in good academic standing in Newcomb-Tulane College who wish to change to part-time status may, with the approval of the dean of Newcomb-Tulane College, transfer to the School of Continuing Studies.

Students on probation in Newcomb-Tulane College who wish to improve their academic standing through part-time studies may, with the approval of the dean of Newcomb-Tulane College, transfer to the School of Continuing Studies but will be admitted on probation.

Note: Students not eligible to return to another division of Tulane University are generally inadmissible to the School of Continuing Studies. These students may appeal to the dean’s office for probationary admission.

Students in the School of Continuing Studies who wish to transfer to Newcomb-Tulane College should obtain the recommendation of the associate dean of the School of Continuing Studies. This recommendation is given only to students who have completed at least one semester in the School of Continuing Studies (two if placed on probation at entry) and are in good academic standing. Students must have completed at least 18 credits including ENGL-101, and either a course satisfying the mathematics requirement or a course that is part of the foreign language requirement as well as have at a least a 2.3 cumulative grade point average.

Transfer of Credit from Other Colleges

Students who wish to transfer credits earned at other colleges and universities must have official transcripts sent directly to the School of Continuing Studies. The School of Continuing Studies will transfer only those credits earned at another college or university which was accredited by a regional authority (such as the Southern Association of Colleges and Schools) at the time the courses were taken. Up to 60 credits may be transferred from a regionally accredited community or junior college. Individual academic departments at Tulane may have rules governing the transfer of credits from community or junior colleges which may affect students. For specifics, contact an academic adviser. No more than 27 credits of business coursework may be transferred to the School of Continuing Studies; no more than 27 credits in business may be applied to any bachelor's degree at the School of Continuing Studies. 

Work from such regionally accredited colleges is transferred at the value in credits/hours for which it was awarded if a grade of C- or higher was earned and if an equivalent Tulane course exists. Work from other schools within Tulane University is transferred at face value, subject to minor differences of interpretation between divisions. Students should be aware that Newcomb-Tulane College has different rules governing transfer credit. These can be found in the Newcomb-Tulane College section of the catalog and would apply if a student subsequently transferred to the full time division of the university.

Students transferring from a school using the quarter, rather than the semester, system are awarded two-thirds of a semester hour for each quarter hour credit. The transfer of credit from institutions not belonging to a regional accrediting body is at the discretion of the School of Continuing Studies. The school does award 12 transfer credits for graduates of the New Orleans Police Academy. Courses transferred from other institutions are never figured into the grade-point average.

Students should see an academic adviser before the end of their first semester to have their credits evaluated. Students should first check with the School of Continuing Studies registrar to see if their transcripts have been received. Transfer credit requested for academic work done more than 10 years ago is subject to review. Coursework from foreign universities will be referred to the Center for International Studies for evaluation. Students desiring transfer credit must submit official transcripts, not photocopies, from all other colleges or universities attended.

Students wishing to take courses at another institution during the summer must first receive approval from the dean’s office and from the appropriate department. Ordinarily, while enrolled at Tulane, part-time students are not permitted to take credit courses at any other university for the purpose of applying such credits toward a degree program at Tulane. Students desiring such an arrangement must obtain the approval of the dean.

Clep Credit

Students enrolled in the School of Continuing Studies may receive up to 15 credits by successfully testing out of courses through the College Level Examination Program (CLEP) or by experiential testing. Credit can be earned in the following courses: Mathematics 121, Chemistry 107, Psychology 100, and Sociology 101. Students interested in taking one or all of these CLEP examinations must contact their academic adviser for information regarding times, dates, and specific tests to be taken. Students who plan to take a CLEP examination are advised to do so during the first two semesters of their enrollment. To receive credit, students must place in the 75th percentile or higher. CLEP credits may be transferred from other accredited institutions if they fulfill stated School of Continuing Studies requirements.

For CLEP credit in the following courses, students must earn an equivalent of a B grade: Elementary Accounting 112, Business Law 340, Intro to Information Systems 110, Humanities 201, Natural Sciences 201, Management Principles 231, Intro to Marketing Principles 320, Litigation I 305.

Note: Students interested in testing for credit in Litigation I 305 only, must contact Sallie E. Davis at 504-865-5333 or at sdavis3@tulane.edu.

CLEP credits may be transferred from other accredited institutions if they fulfill stated School of Continuing Studies requirements.

Note: Credits awarded through CLEP may not be transferable to other Tulane divisions.

Delgado Community College provides a convenient designated testing center for the College Level Examination Program for students attending the School of Continuing Studies’ Louisiana campuses. For Mississippi students, there is a testing center at William Carey College in Hattiesburg.

Tuition and Fees

Tuition at the School of Continuing Studies is assessed per course. For 2010-2011, it has been fixed at the rate of $292 per credit hour ($876 for a three credit course) for part-time students. The same fee applies to courses taken on an audit basis.

In addition to tuition, part-time students pay university and student activity fees. School of Continuing Studies students may register for courses offered by other divisions at Tulane but must pay a substantially higher tuition for those courses. Several sessions of evening courses are offered each summer at regular School of Continuing Studies rates. School of Continuing Studies students may take daytime Summer School courses without restriction but must pay tuition at the Summer School rate rather than the School of Continuing Studies rate. Special fees are charged for laboratory and studio courses, and special examinations as specified in the Schedule of Classes published by the Registrar’s Office.

Tuition refunds are allowed for students who drop courses (effective when received in the School of Continuing Studies office) by the dates specified in the academic calendar published online. Failure to attend does not constitute a withdrawal.

No diploma or transcript will be given to a student who is in default on any payments due to Tulane University.

Note: Application, lab, and university fees are nonrefundable.

TUITION DISCOUNTS

For Teachers

Full-time teachers employed at schools approved by the Louisiana State Board of Elementary and Secondary Education and the Mississippi State Board of Education may qualify for a 50 percent tuition discount. Elementary and secondary teachers and counselors enrolled in courses appropriate to their respective fields are eligible.

For more information, contact the Center for Education at 504-865-5342.

For Senior Citizens

Students who are 60 years or older qualify for the senior citizen tuition discount, which entitles them to take School of Continuing Studies credit courses for one-half off the regular tuition rate. Senior citizens who wish to take advantage of this discount must inform the School of Continuing Studies registrar of their status and complete the Senior Citizen Discount Form. A copy of a birth certificate, driver’s license, or other proof of age must accompany this form.

For Employees of the City of New Orleans

Full-time employees of the City of New Orleans receive a 50 percent tuition discount on all courses listed in the School of Continuing Studies section of the schedule of classes. To qualify for this discount, Certification of Employment forms must be completed by the application deadline for each new semester. This discount also applies to employees of New Orleans Regional Transit Authority, the Orleans Parish Criminal Sheriff’s Office, and the Housing Authority of New Orleans. The same certification procedure is required.

For Employees of Jefferson Parish

Full-time employees of Jefferson Parish and its municipalities, including parish courts, receive a 50 percent tuition discount on all courses listed in the School of Continuing Studies section of the schedule of classes. To qualify for this discount, Certification of Employment forms must be completed by the application deadline for each new semester.

Active-duty Military Personnel

Active-duty military personnel or a spouse are eligible for a 50 percent tuition discount on all courses listed in the School of Continuing Studies section of the schedule of classes. To qualify for this discount, active-duty military personnel or spouse must complete the Tuition Discount form by the published deadline and present military identification and service member’s duty orders.

Discounts are percentages of tuition. No combination of tuition discounts entitles a student to a 100 percent discount. There are no discounts for Master of Liberal Arts or Master of Professional Studies courses.

Academic Policies

Academic Performance

Credits and Grades

Undergraduate units at Tulane University are measured by credits that correspond to the number of hours the class meets per week. Most courses meet three hours a week and are valued at three credits.

The School of Continuing Studies, along with the other undergraduate divisions of Tulane, adopted a plus/minus grading system beginning fall 1981. Each grade is assigned a number of grade points that are used in the calculation of the grade-point average. Grades and grade points used in the School of Continuing Studies are:

A 4.00
A- 3.67
B+ 3.33
B 3.00
B- 2.67
C+ 2.33
C 2.00 (average)
C- 1.67
D+ 1.33
D 1.00
D- 0.67
F failing, no grade points = 0.00
WF withdrawn failing, counts in the GPA as an F = 0.00
UW unofficial withdrawal, counts in GPA as an F = 0.00
W withdrawn passing, not used in GPA computation
S satisfactory, not used in GPA computation (C- or above) but counted in earned hours
U unsatisfactory, not used in GPA computation (below C-) and earns no credit
AU audit, not used in GPA computation
I incomplete, no grade points = 0.00

Satisfactory/Unsatisfactory

Students in the School of Continuing Studies may avail themselves of the satisfactory/unsatisfactory option. A course with the grade of satisfactory (S) may not be used to satisfy the proficiency, foreign language, major, or minor requirements, and no more than 18 credits of S will be credited toward the degree. Students should be aware that many colleges will not accept the transfer of credit with this grade.

Students may take three credits of work on a satisfactory/unsatisfactory basis per academic year (fall, spring and summer) if they have completed at least 30 credits of college work and are not on probation.

In order to receive a satisfactory grade, students must earn a C- or higher. The grade of S is not calculated into the grade-point average. Grades below C- will be designated as unsatisfactory (U). The grade of U will not be calculated into the grade-point average.

Audit

Any student may take a course on an audit basis. No credit is earned for this work, but the course is entered on the official transcript with a grade of AU. Part-time students must pay the appropriate tuition for an audited course.

Incompletes

An incomplete grade is given at the discretion of the instructor. It allows a maximum extension of one month after the end of the term for the completion of the coursework. If the work has not been submitted by the deadline, the incomplete is converted to an F.

Repeated Courses

Part-time students who do not want a grade to count in the grade-point average may repeat the course provided that:

If both of the above conditions are met, the student must meet with an adviser and request that the first grade be dropped from computation in the grade-point average. The grade for the repeated course, even if lower than the first grade, will be factored into the student’s GPA. The grade for the first course will still remain on the student’s transcript.

Note: If passing grades are recorded twice or more for the same course, only the credit hours for one course will count towards the graduation total. Grades assigned by a university committee, including a WF for an Honor Code conviction, cannot be removed from the student’s transcript or cumulative grade-point average even though the course may be repeated.

Maximum Credits for Part-Time Students

Students in good standing in the School of Continuing Studies are limited to 13 credits per semester. Undergraduate students may not enroll in 700-level courses.

Honors

A dean’s list of undergraduate students is compiled at the end of the fall and spring semesters and posted in the School of Continuing Studies office. To be eligible for the dean’s list, students must earn a grade-point average of 3.40 or greater. Students who earn a grade of U on any courses taken on a satisfactory/unsatisfactory basis are not eligible to be on the dean’s list. Part-time students must pass at least six credits, excluding those earned in courses taken on a satisfactory/unsatisfactory basis; full-time students must pass at least nine credits, excluding those earned in courses on a satisfactory/ unsatisfactory basis. Superior baccalaureate students are recognized at graduation by the award of the distinction cum laude. To qualify, a student must have a cumulative grade-point average of at least 3.40, must have earned at least 36 credits at Tulane University, excluding those earned in courses on a satisfactory/unsatisfactory basis, and must be receiving a bachelor’s degree.

The Theta Chapter of Alpha Sigma Lambda is a national scholastic honor society for part-time college students, and invitations for membership are extended each year to qualified students. To be eligible, students must be enrolled on a part-time basis in a degree program, have attended the School of Continuing Studies for at least three semesters, earned at least 36 credits at Tulane, and have a cumulative grade-point average of at least 3.200. Additional information on requirements and invitations to membership can be obtained from the chapter adviser in the School of Continuing Studies office.

Registration

Beginning with the 2010 spring term, use Gibson Online to register for classes.

Using Gibson Online to register for classes:

For assistance with registration, please contact the Office of the University Registrar (504) 865-5231.

All students must register by the beginning of each semester. Students register with Gibson Online, Tulane University’s Online Registration. Information regarding dates, times, and procedures for Gibson Online appears in the schedule of classes placed on the  Registar’s webpage.  The Registrar’s office forwards all registration material and information to student’s Tulane email account. All admitted students are eligible to register with Gibson Online. Currently enrolled students are given the first opportunity to register for coming semesters. Accounts Receivable mails bills for tuition and fees; students assume financial obligation for their courses upon registration.

Students wishing to add or drop courses should consult the academic calendar for deadlines and instructions. Failure to make schedule adjustments promptly and accurately may result in financial or academic penalties.

Note: The School of Continuing Studies reserves the right to cancel any course with inadequate enrollment.

Requirements for Graduation

Students must submit an application for degree/certificate early in the semester in which they plan to graduate. This application must be completed with the student’s academic adviser. Applications for degree/certificate are available at each campus location. When students apply for their degree, their work is evaluated by the criteria in place at the start of their work towards that degree. As the School of Continuing Studies responds to advancements in education, changes in our curriculum go into effect for students who start the program the following semester. If you are concerned that a change in our curriculum will affect your degree requirements, or if you would like to take advantage of such changes, see your adviser.

Associate Degree

To receive an associate degree, the student must complete all of the program requirements and have at least a 2.000 cumulative grade-point average.

Bachelor’s Degree

To receive a first baccalaureate degree from the School of Continuing Studies, students must have a minimum of 120 credits of passing work, as follows:

Writing Competency

   
English/Writing 4 credits
   
Quantitative Reasoning 3-4 credits
(BA, BGS, BFA) Mathematics (BS) 6-8 credits
Perspectives Outside European Tradition/Comparative Cultures 6-8 credits or
Foreign Language 8 credits
Supporting Requirement 3 credits
In Oral Communications  
   
(Not required for students majoring in disciplines in the School of Liberal Arts and the School of Science and Engineering)
   

Distribution Requirement

 
   
(BGS, BA or BS with The School of Continuing Studies major)  
Humanities 12 credits
Science 12 credits
Social Science 12 credits
(BA or BS with majors in the School of Liberal Arts and the School of Science and Engineering)  
   
Humanities 9 credits
Science 10 credits
Social Science 9 credits
Writing 3-4 credits
Comparative Culture Perspective Outside the European Tradition 3 credits
   
Social Science (BFA) 9 credits
Humanities 9 credits
Science 10 credits
   

Major Requirements

 
   
Major (BA, BS) 30 to 36 credits
Concentration (Humanities or Social Sciences) 30 credits
Fine Arts (BFA) 48 credits
   

Minor Option

 
   
Minor 5-18 credits
Electives 21 to 24 credits
   

Minimum Credits to Graduate

120 credits

Students must have a cumulative 2.0 grade point average to graduate. They must also have a minimum 2.0 grade point average in their major. For School of Continuing Studies majors, at least 60 credits must be earned in courses at the 200 level or higher.

No more than half the credits used toward satisfying graduation requirements may be in the major. Students may take no more than 70 credits each of humanities, science, and social science. This includes credits in the major. Undergraduate students may not enroll in 700-level courses.

Students may not submit toward graduation requirements more than 6 credits of electives earned in courses with designations such as Independent Study, Special Projects, Directed Study, and Practicum. Students who must exceed this limit are required to petition the dean’s office.

Writing Requirement

English 1010, a 4-credit intensive writing course, is Tulane’s writing requirement. In addition to English 1010 students majoring in School of Continuing Studies disciplines must also complete 3 credits in intensive writing. Consult your academic adviser before registering for an intensive writing course. Students who need to review basic English skills before enrolling in English 1010 may wish to take CSEN 1000 for elective credit. English 1000 does not count toward the completion of the writing requirement.

Quantitive Reasoning Requirement

Students working toward a Bachelor’s Degree are required to demonstrate proficiency in 3-4 credits of quantitative reasoning by passing any mathematics course; CPST 1070, Philosophy 1060 or 1210, or BSMT 3250.

Students majoring in an LAS discipline may not use CPST 1070, Phil 1060, or BSMT 3250 to satisfy this requirement.) Instead they must do one of the following:

Foreign Language Requirement

Students pursuing any bachelor’s degree offered by the School of Continuing Studies are required to demonstrate proficiency in a foreign language. Proficiency is demonstrated through successful completion of the second level in any foreign language or two courses in Perspectives Outside the European Tradition/Comparative Cultures and International Perspectives (Non-Western). Students may also blend one language and one non-Western course. These are such courses as Anth 1020, 3010, 3160, or HISL 1710, or LAST 1010.

Supporting Requirement

Students majoring in School of Continuing Studies disciplines are required to complete one course in oral communications. There are no supporting requirements for students majoring in LAS (Liberal Arts and Sciences) disciplines.

Distribution Requirement

Students majoring in School of Continuing Studies disciplines are required to complete 12 credits each of humanities/fine arts, sciences, and social sciences. In each distribution area, courses must be chosen from at least two different disciplines.

Students majoring in LAS disciplines must complete 12 credits in Cultural Knowledge, comprising any six credits of Humanities and Fine Arts and any six credits of Social Sciences. They must also complete 6-8 credits in Physical, Life and Behavioral Sciences. This requirement can be attained by successful completion of two courses selected from: architectural technological systems, astronomy, biology, chemistry, earth and environmental sciences, neuroscience, physics, psychology, or in public health (only SPHU 1020 or SPHU 2020. Note: One of the science courses must be selected from a list of courses with an approved laboratory component.

Courses taken to satisfy proficiency and supporting requirements may not be used to fulfill distribution requirements for School of Continuing Studies majors. For majors in the liberal arts and sciences, courses taken to satisfy proficiency requirements may not be used for distribution requirements.

Major Requirements

Courses taken to satisfy proficiency, supporting, and distribution requirements may be used to fulfill major and minor requirements. However, you may not receive double credit for the same course. At least 24 credits in the major must not overlap with the minor. Students must have a grade point average of 2.0 in the major to receive the degree.

Residence Requirement

At least 60 credits of a student’s degree program must be completed at Tulane University, with the final 30 taken while enrolled in the School of Continuing Studies. For an associate degree, certificate, major, or minor, at least one-half of the credits required in the area of concentration must be completed while enrolled in the School of Continuing Studies.

Limitations

Leave Restrictions for Returning Students

Students who return to the School of Continuing Studies after an absence of more than seven semesters may not be able to complete the program in which they originally enrolled. Returning students should talk with an academic adviser to determine possible changes in requirements or curriculum.

Business Course Restriction

Students may not earn more than 27 credits in courses under the business studies category or apply more than 27 credits of business courses toward any School of Continuing Studies program. Business studies credits earned at the School of Continuing Studies are not applicable to any AACSB-accredited business school. All courses in accounting, business law, finance, management, and marketing fall within this restriction.

Academic Standards

A student may be dismissed from the School of Continuing Studies for lack of sufficient academic progress toward fulfilling degree requirements. Through adherence to these regulations, the university seeks to ensure that its educational facilities are reserved for capable students who are motivated. For continued eligibility, academic progress is measured both by minimum credit and minimum grade-point average.

Part-time students in good academic standing may enroll in no more than 13 credits each semester.

Academic Progress

Undergraduate classification is based on cumulative earned credits:

Freshman 0-24 earned credits
Sophomore 25-56 earned credits
Junior 57-91 earned credits
Senior over 91 earned credits

Students in the School of Continuing Studies are required to maintain a minimum grade-point average throughout their enrollment (see table below). Students who fail to meet this minimum standard are placed on academic probation. The cumulative grade-point average of a student is calculated by dividing the number of quality points a student has earned by the total number of quality hours (including credits with failures). Only the grades of S, U, NR, W, and grades in courses affected by the School of Continuing Studies’ “Repeated Course” policy are excluded from this calculation.

Academic Enforcement for Part-Time Students

The quality of each part-time student’s work will be monitored at the end of each semester. Enforcement consists of two distinct steps: probation and dismissal.

Probation

Any student who does not meet the minimum cumulative grade-point average as shown in the table below will be placed on academic probation. The status of probation lasts until it is removed as a result of academic improvement or ended by dismissal. Part-time students who are placed on probation are notified in writing that their academic progress is insufficient, and they are given a set time period (ordinarily one semester) in which to raise their cumulative grade-point average to the required level. Students on probation may enroll in no more than seven credits. As a further condition, all coursework taken while on probation must be passed with at least the grade of C. Students on probation cannot be given a recommendation of good academic standing to another institution for purpose of cross-enrollment or summer school admission. Transfer students admitted on probation to the School of Continuing Studies may enroll in no more than seven credits. In addition they must earn at least a 1.500 grade-point average during their first term of enrollment or they will be dismissed.

Dismissal

After attempting 31 credits at Tulane, students will be dismissed if they fail to earn a C in each course taken while they are on academic probation. Dismissal from the university is for a period of at least one academic semester (summer is not counted as a semester). A third dismissal cannot be appealed. The dismissal period is one calendar year. Any coursework taken at another college or university during the dismissal period is not transferable to the School of Continuing Studies.

Minimum Credits and Grade Point Average Quality-of-Work Rules

Minimum Cumulative Minimum Cumulative
Attempted Hours GPA
1-30 1.75
31-61 1.85
62-93 1.95
94-124 2.00

Reinstatement

Any student who has been dismissed from the School of Continuing Studies has the right to petition the School of Continuing Studies Academic Performance and Petitions Committee. Students who return after their dismissal period are placed on academic probation.

Petitions

Written petitions from students who have been denied registration under these regulations are evaluated by the Academic Performance and Petitions Committee of the School of Continuing Studies.

Successful petitioners will be readmitted on the terms and conditions specified by the committee, which may include limitation on the number of courses, specification of courses that must be taken, progress that must be achieved, the time within which terms and conditions must be met, and classification of academic standing.

Class Attendance

Regular attendance is essential to successful academic progress. Students are expected to attend all classes, laboratories, seminars, and conferences as scheduled unless they are ill or prevented from attending by exceptional circumstances.

Since the majority of the School of Continuing Studies students are adults attending part-time, the administration and faculty try to accommodate their special needs. Occasionally, family or work may conflict with school responsibilities.

Instructors may establish policies for attendance of their classes, which are announced at the beginning of the semester and included in the course syllabus. Students who find it necessary to miss class are responsible for obtaining notes on material covered in lectures or other class sessions. It is up to the instructor to determine whether to allow the student to make up missed quizzes, examinations, or other exercises.

Students are also responsible for notifying professors about absences that result from serious illnesses, injuries or critical personal problems. Medical excuses are not issued by the University Health Service, except in instances of illnesses or injuries that involve hospitalization, in the event of partial or complete withdrawal due to medical reasons, or in the event of a missed final examination for a medical condition being cared for by the Student Health Center. In all of these instances medical information will only be released with the student’s written permission. Students should be aware that instructors have the right to lower grades for excessive absence or failure to make up work missed. They may also assign a grade of WF.

Students who find their attendance seriously interrupted by exceptional, unforeseen circumstances are encouraged to discuss their difficulties with their instructor or academic adviser.

Grades of WF are assigned by administrators and are computed in the grade-point average as if they were Fs. With the approval of the associate dean, an instructor may have a student who has excessive absences involuntarily dropped from a course with a WF grade after written warning at any time during the semester. In cases where students are suspended or expelled during the semester, W or WF grades may be assigned at the discretion of the instructors and the student’s dean. A grade of W or WF also may be assigned for disciplinary penalties in connection with an honor-code or conduct-code violation. A student who ceases to attend a course but has not withdrawn officially will receive a UW [unofficial withdrawal]. After the last day to drop without record and before the last day to drop a course, students who drop courses voluntarily will have W noted on their transcripts for each course dropped.

Code of Academic Conduct

The integrity of all undergraduate students is based on the absolute honesty of the entire community in all academic endeavors. As part of that community, students have certain responsibilities regarding all independent work that forms the basis for the evaluation of their academic achievement. Tulane students are expected to familiarize themselves with the principles of this code and to conduct themselves in a manner that complies with it at all times (see Newcomb-Tulane College Section for explanation of the Code of Academic Conduct).

Conduct

Responsible adult behavior is expected of students in the School of Continuing Studies in both scholastic and non-scholastic affairs. Violations of the rules and regulations, including those on academic honesty, lead to disciplinary action by a dean of the School of Continuing Studies, the vice president for student affairs, or other appropriate university authority. The School of Continuing Studies reserves the right to be the judge of a student’s fitness to continue attendance or to be recommended for graduation.

Discipline

Departures from acceptable conduct may lead to fines, disciplinary probation, suspension or expulsion. Disciplinary probation (which refers to conduct and not to academic standing) and suspension usually are imposed for a stated period. Suspension and expulsion involve exclusion from classes and from all University activities. Students suspended or expelled receive Ws or WFs in all courses at the discretion of the dean. Expulsion is the most serious academic penalty and is permanent. It is noted on the student’s record and included on transcripts issued thereafter. Suspension is noted on the student’s record and on transcripts issued while the penalty is in effect, but the notice is removed from the transcript at the end of the suspension. Transfer credits cannot be accepted for students who attend other colleges or universities while ineligible for any reason to continue in the School of Continuing Studies.

Reporting to the Dean

All students must report to the Dean of the School of Continuing Studies, the vice president for student affairs, or to their adviser or instructors without delay when notified to do so.

Grievance Committee

The School of Continuing Studies Grievance Committee is composed of three faculty and two student members and the associate or assistant dean as a nonvoting member. One of the committee’s duties is to hear students’ grievances and complaints against Tulane University and the School of Continuing Studies or Tulane personnel, including the faculty. The Grievance Committee deals with issues such as the grading system, sexual harassment and unfair treatment. Students desiring a hearing before the committee must submit their requests in writing to the associate or assistant dean. Students who are dissatisfied with the committee’s decision may appeal to the dean. For additional information about the committee and its procedures, the student should contact the School of Continuing Studies office.

Right to Privacy

Privacy of students’ records and affairs is protected under the Federal Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act of 1974 as amended (P.L. 93-380) and by policies issued by the Tulane University Board of Administrators: a university must allow a student the opportunity to review and inspect his or her educational records; a university must give a student the opportunity to challenge the content of his or her records under certain circumstances; a university must not grant access to or allow disclosure of a student’s records to outside parties, unless such disclosure is specifically permitted under the law or is made with the student’s written consent; a university must notify students of their rights under the law. For further details, contact the Office of Student Affairs at 865-5180.

Academic Options

Cross Registration

Students can enroll in undergraduate courses not listed in the School of Continuing Studies offerings. For courses listed under the School of Liberal Arts, students need only meet the prerequisites before enrolling. The Schools of Architecture, Business, Public Health and Tropical Medicine, or Science and Engineering courses require the relevant dean’s approval.

Double Majors

Students may complete two majors by meeting the requirements established by the departments concerned. Although two diplomas are not awarded for a double major, both majors are listed on the permanent record from which transcripts are made.

To undertake a double major, students must plan each major with the department concerned. Some minimal overlap may occur: in cases where one course is listed by two major departments as part of the major curriculum of each: for instance, Social Psychology is listed under both the sociology and psychology departments; in cases where one major is departmental and the other interdepartmental: for example, a double major in English and Medieval Studies might have a Chaucer course in common. In any case, each major of a double major must show at least eight courses that do not overlap, except a double major in Cell and Molecular Biology where no more than five courses may overlap.

Independent Studies

Because the School of Continuing Studies believes superior students should assume responsibility for some of the direction of their own education, many departments offer to a limited number of students of superior scholastic standing creative opportunities for independent study under the direction of a faculty member especially interested in individual instruction.

The work may take the form of directed readings, laboratory or library research, or original composition. Instead of traditional class attendance, the student substitutes conferences, as needed, with the director.

Students who wish to take an independent studies course must have the approval of the associate dean.

Internships

An internship involves a relevant academic foundation in addition to an experiential learning process. The academic foundation may, for example, consist of a term paper, a number of short papers, discussions of a number of books, and the like. Students may identify their own internship opportunity or they may consult with those persons on campus who coordinate internship programs to arrange an internship experience.

Internships are available through various departments. Students participating in elective internships register for Internship Studies (course numbers 456, 457) within the appropriate department after having made initial arrangements with a professor who will sponsor the internship. Registration is completed using an Internship Studies Registration form. Each student registered for an internship must submit an Internship Prospectus form to the appropriate departmental chair for approval within one week prior to the end of the add period. A copy of this form bearing the signatures of the student, sponsoring professor, internship supervisor and departmental chair also must be filed with the Office of the Dean within one week of the end of the add period. These forms are available in departmental offices and the Office of the Dean.

Each student completing an internship must write a synopsis of the internship, including both the academic and experimental components. This synopsis is to be approved by both the supervising professor and the appropriate departmental chair and filed with the Office of the Dean prior to the end of the final examination period.

Internships are open only to juniors and seniors in good standing. Only one internship may be completed per semester.

Requirements of the media arts and paralegal studies practica (internships) differ somewhat, since these practica are required. Students must register in Paralegal Studies 590 (or 501 for students admitted prior to Summer 1991), or Media Arts 505 during the regular registration period. Arrangements for these practica should be made with the media arts or paralegal studies program directors.

School of Continuing Studies Alternative Internship Experience

An alternative internship experience is offered to the School of Continuing Studies students through the office of the associate dean. This internship is for students seeking an internship with organizations which require that interns earn credit for their experience. CSTR 199 carries one credit, which will apply toward the degree, but will not apply toward any proficiency, distribution, major, or minor requirement. Only one credit of CSTR 199 may be applied toward the degree. CSTR 199 must be taken on a satisfactory/unsatisfactory (S/U) basis. Students who have completed fewer than 30 credits may not register for this course. Students desiring to register for CSTR 199 must receive approval from the associate dean before registering for the course.

Second Degrees

Students already holding a baccalaureate degree may enroll in the School of Continuing Studies for a second baccalaureate degree. They must complete a total of 150 credits instead of 120 (60 credits must be taken at Tulane University), satisfy the School of Continuing Studies’ core competency, supporting, distribution, and residency requirements for a second degree, and fulfill the requirements for the major.

Business Studies

Our increasingly sophisticated business community demands effective leaders, those who possess strong analytical skills, an ability to deal with diverse audiences, and an awareness of current trends in business practices. Tulane’s evening programs in Business Studies provide valuable opportunities for individuals seeking business career advancement. There is a 27-credit limit on the number of business courses a student in the School of Continuing Studies may take.

Note: Business Studies courses in the School of Continuing Studies do not satisfy degree requirements for full-time Newcomb-Tulane students.

Minors Offered

For minors, students must have a 2.00 grade-point average in all required coursework and 50 percent of the coursework must be earned at Tulane.

Associate Degrees Offered in Applied Business

Associate Degrees in Business (2004)

The School of Continuing Studies offers Associate of Arts degree in Applied Business Studies, Human Resource Management, Marketing and Small Business Development. These degrees are designed to recognize satisfactory completion of a two-year program of specialized business study.

Students must have a 2.00 grade-point average in all required coursework as well as a 2.00 cumulative GPA. At least half of the general requirements of 37 credits and at least 12 credits of the core requirement of 24 credits must be completed at Tulane. There is a 27-credit limit on the number of courses a student in the School of Continuing Studies may take.

Note: Business courses at the School of Continuing Studies are not transferable to the A.B. Freeman School of Business.

Students must have a 2.00 grade-point average in all required coursework. Half of the required 24 credits must be completed at Tulane University. Courses taken for a baccalaureate degree will not be accepted for transfer credit towards the program. Only those courses successfully completed, “C” or better, after a student received a Baccalaureate Degree will be considered for credit.

Baccalaureate and Master’s Degrees in Business

Students who wish to pursue a Bachelor of Science in Management or a Master of Business Administration degree (full- or part-time) should contact the Admissions Office, A.B. Freeman School of Business, 504-865-5410..

The Schools of Liberal Arts and Science and Engineering

School of Continuing Studies students may select any major in the School of Liberal Arts or the School of Science and Engineering which offers a B.A. or B.S. degree. The academic departments determine the requirements for these majors. Students electing this option must fulfill the core curriculum requirements for the major. Students should consult with their School of Continuing Studies adviser if they wish to pursue a major offered by these schools. Note: Majors completed in areas not sponsored by the School of Continuing Studies may require some day course enrollment at a higher tuition rate.

Special Programs

Professional Development Courses

The School of Continuing Studies offers special seminars and workshops at the Elmwood campus and at other locations during the regular academic year. These short courses do not carry academic credit. For more information, call 862-8000 x 8651.

Concurrent Enrollment for High School Students

The School of Continuing Studies offers a concurrent enrollment program for outstanding high-school students. To qualify, students must have a minimum grade-point average of 3.200, and an SAT score of at least 1800, an ACT composite of at least 26, or a PSAT score of 120 (2 parts) or 180 (3 parts). Concurrent enrollment students may enroll in either or both semesters of the regular academic year or the summer sessions.

The concurrent enrollment program offers qualified high-school students the opportunity to get an early start on their college education. Students take regular college coursework and earn credits and grades that become a part of their permanent college record. Concurrent enrollment students may apply for admission to Tulane upon graduation from high school, or they may transfer their Tulane credits to another institution, depending on the regulations in effect at that institution.

The School of Continuing Studies tuition rates apply to all courses.

Applied Business Studies

Programs Offered

Applied Business Studies Courses

Applied Computing Systems and Technology

Computer-based information systems have become a critical part of the products, services, operations, and management of modern organizations. The effective and efficient use of information and communications technologies is an important element in achieving competitive advantage for business organizations and delivering excellence in service for government and non-profit organizations. The programs in Applied Computing Systems and Technology are designed to prepare graduates who are professionally competent and able to make valuable contributions to an organization in the application of information systems and technology in helping to achieve organization goals. This is accomplished by providing students with a challenging academic program of study presented by a faculty of experienced Information Systems and Information Technology professionals. The programs emphasize developing the student’s ability to think critically, communicate technical information effectively, collaborate in team environments, and apply computer-based solutions to practical problems. They provide a breadth of knowledge in the fundamental areas of Information Systems and Information Technology and allow for in-depth study in the areas of application development, database systems, web application development, business systems analysis, and information technology.

The School of Continuing Studies offers a Bachelor of Science, an Associate of Science, a minor, and five post-baccalaureate certificates in the area of Applied Computing. The programs are open to all part-time students admitted to the School of Continuing Studies.

Post-Baccalaureatte Certificates

Post-Baccalaureate Certificates are available to students who already hold a bachelor’s degree. Certificates are available in each of the 5 areas of concentration available in the BS degree. Each certificate consists of the 6 core courses required in the BS degree and the 6 required courses for the chosen concentration area. Students seeking to earn multiple certificates can not overlap elective courses from on certificate to another certificate.

Programs Offered

Applied Computing Systems and Technology Courses

Casino Resort Studies

The Casino Resort Studies program is designed to allow students to earn a bachelor of arts degree, an associate of arts degree, or earn a minor as part of a baccalaureate degree in a discipline other than Casino Resort studies. For students with a baccalaureate degree a post-baccalaureate certificate is offered.

Programs Offered

Casino Resort Studies Courses

Homeland Security

Programs Offered

Homeland Security Courses

Homeland Security, Master of Professional Studies

The Master of Professional Studies (MPS) degree in homeland security is the first MPS degree approved by Tulane University. The Master of Professional Studies (MPS) is a recognized graduate degree program concentrating in applied fields of study. The MPS degree is often a terminal degree and is usually either interdisciplinary or multidisciplinary. The fields of concentration are in areas not readily aligned with traditional disciplines of university graduate study. The more traditional Master of Arts or Master of Science degrees primarily concentrate on research, methodology, and theory, serving as a benchmark toward the PhD. The Master of Professional Studies, by definition and application, emphasizes learning relevant to professional employment. In short, it focuses primarily on practical, applied disciplines requiring fieldwork or internships as complements to the curriculum. MPS programs provide specialized, experiential learning in a range of professional careers, including historic preservation, public relations, human resource management, and homeland security. Several leading universities in the United States offer the MPS. Among them are Cornell University, City University of New York, Georgetown University, New York University, and the University of Denver.


Tulane University’s School of Continuing Studies offers a multidisciplinary Master of Professional Studies (MPS) degree. The MPS degree program at Tulane consists of four core graduate courses that cover a range of academic disciplines including medical issues for non-medical emergency managers, intelligence analysis, maritime security and advanced approaches to counter terrorism. The Master of Professional Studies program welcomes students of diverse educational backgrounds and promotes the acquisition of knowledge through scholarly research and writing.


After successfully completing the core courses, students may take six homeland security graduate courses to complete their degree. However, a student may choose to substitute (with director approval) up to 9 credit hours (3 classes) from a set of preapproved courses located within the School of Continuing Studies MLA program, School of Liberal Arts, School of Science and Engineering, the School of Social Work, the Payson Center and the School of Public Health and Tropical Medicine. This list of courses will be maintained by the director of the MPS program. In consultation with the MPS director, Captain Keith Amacker (kamacker@tulane.edu) and tailored to their interests, students will develop an individual plan of study consistent with the degree objectives and tailored to their interests.


ADMISSION


• Students applying to the MPS program must hold a baccalaureate degree from a regionally accredited college or university.
• Students must submit an application (see below) including a brief statement of 250-500 words describing how graduate education at Tulane University can assist with the achievement of their objectives.
• Students must submit official college transcripts from each college attended.
• Ordinarily, a successful applicant has at least a “B” (3.00) average in all coursework taken.


Completed applications are reviewed by the MPS director and Admissions Committee throughout the year. The MPS application may be submitted to the School of Continuing Studies after the applicant has consulted with Captain Amacker about the program.


Conditional Admission

Applicants to the MPS program may be conditionally admitted. Conditional admission stipulates that the student is limited to one course in his/her first semester of enrollment. Such students must earn a grade of “B” or better to gain regular admission. Students who do not receive a grade of “B” or better will not be admitted to the MPS program.


DEGREE REQUIREMENTS


The School of Continuing Studies awards the MPS degree following the successful completion of ten graduate courses comprised of four core 600-level courses and six 700-level courses, which may include graduate courses from other Tulane schools. No thesis is required. Students may not apply more than two independent study courses toward fulfilling graduation requirements for the MPS. In order to earn the Master of Professional Studies degree, a student must have a cumulative grade point average of at least 3.00. Students must also submit an application for degree, available from the School of Continuing Studies Dean’s office, at the beginning of the semester in which the student plans to complete all required coursework.


ACADEMIC PROGRESS REQUIREMENTS


Students admitted to the MPS program must maintain an overall grade point average of 3.00 or better to be considered in good academic standing. Students whose grade point average falls below 3.00 will be placed on academic probation and limited to a maximum of six credit hours in the subsequent semester. Students will be removed from academic probation when they earn an overall grade point average of at least 3.00.


Students may apply one “B-“toward degree requirements; however, students who earn a second “B-“will be dismissed from the program. Students who receive a grade of “C+” in any coursework attempted will be dismissed from the program.


TRANSFER CREDITS


Students in good standing may petition to transfer a maximum of nine credit hours (three courses) of graduate coursework from other colleges or universities to the MPS degree. However, only courses with grades of “B” or better, completed within five years of enrolling in the MPS program, may be considered for transfer credit.

Pre-Law

There is no standard pre-law curriculum that must be followed for admission to law school. A well-rounded, general liberal arts education is the best preparation for the study of law. The Tulane Law School recommends the completion of courses in history, political science, philosophy, economics, and accounting. All law schools stress the importance of developing skills in communication, both spoken and written, in critical analysis, and in rational thinking. Students may explore their interest in legal studies by taking PRLW 101: Law in American Society, PRLW 340 Business Law, PRLW345 Commercial Law, or PRLW 334 Real Estate Law and other courses listed under the heading “Pre-Law” in the course description section of this catalog, but these courses in no way constitute a pre-law curriculum. Students interested in law school may consult with the university’s pre-law adviser, housed in the pre-professional advising office, or with the School of Continuing Studies’ paralegal studies director.

Pre-Law Courses

Media Arts

The Media Arts program at the School of Continuing Studies offers majors and minors in Media Arts, Public Relations, Digital Design, Website Development and Graphic Design. Post-baccalaureate certificates are offered in all five majors.

The program is open to all part-time students admitted to the School of Continuing Studies. The program concentrates on oral and written applied communications skills, acquaintance with computer technologies, and aspects of business relevant to communicators. Students can tailor course selection to their areas of interest. Electives may be chosen from an array of disciplines, including English, Speech, Communication, Marketing, Information Technology, Website Design and Development, and Media Arts.

The program prepares students for careers in areas such as journalism, graphic design, digital design, computer art, public relations, radio, and television.

Programs Offered

Media Arts Courses

Paralegal Studies

The Tulane paralegal studies program is a college credit program, established in 1979. The program was first grant approval by the American Bar Association in 1981, and it remains the oldest such approved program in this region. The School of Continuing Studies offers Bachelor’s and Associate’s degrees in Paralegal Studies, a Minor, and a Post-Baccalaureate Certificate upon fulfillment of the requirements listed below.

Tulane’s Paralegal Studies Program prepares professionals who are ready to succeed in today’s competitive legal environment. According to the American Bar Association, a paralegal is:

“…a person qualified by education, training or work experience who is employed or retained by a lawyer, law office, corporation, governmental agency or other entity and who performs specifically delegated substantive legal work for which a lawyer is responsible.”

Paralegals are not lawyers and do not practice law. Under the supervision of attorneys, they work in large and small law firms, banks, corporations, legislatures, administrative agencies, legal aid offices and clinics, and in public and private advocacy associations.

The primary goal of Tulane’s Paralegal Studies Program is to educate students of diverse background to become effective, ethical and professional paralegals who are employable in a variety of legal settings and who are committed to on-going improvement and continuing paralegal education. The program encourages diversity in its student body and faculty and is committed to equal opportunity in its placement program. The program achieves this goal by meeting the following objectives:

  1. *To provide students with a comprehensive general education that includes studies in writing, formal thought, speech, the humanities, sciences and social sciences, and that is designed to develop students’ critical thinking and communication skills.
  2. *To educate students about the role of the paralegal in the delivery of legal service.
  3. *To educate students to perform legal and factual investigation and research using both traditional and technology-based methods.
  4. *To educate students about the court system, including civil, criminal and administrative fields, on trial and appellate levels, and also on alternative dispute resolution methods.
  5. *To teach students to analyze factual situations, handle legal procedures, and draft legal documents used in state and federal practice.
  6. *To prepare students to function effectively with the computer technology used in practice and to adapt to ever-changing technological advances.
  7. *To assist students to develop the organizational skills necessary for successful law office functioning, including categorizing and organizing documents, calendaring, prioritizing work, managing time, using forms, and maintaining billing data.
  8. *To expose students to a range of specialty areas enabling them to explore their interests and to prepare for careers in a variety of settings, including but not limited to immigration law, family law, corporate law, personal injury and medical malpractice, healthcare compliance, and succession practice.
  9. *To provide students with an understanding of the rules of ethics and professional standards that govern lawyers, their application to paralegals, and of the ethical codes and canons if the national paralegal associations.
  10. *To encourage students to engage in lifelong learning and professional development and to support continuing paralegal education opportunities for graduates and other members of the local paralegal community.

The program runs a job placement service at no cost to students, graduates, or employers. Students are encouraged to join the Tulane University Paralegal Association (TUPA), to take advantage of the networking and mentoring opportunities available. TUPA sponsors speakers events, disseminates information on career opportunities, and promotes high standards in the paralegal profession.

Students can earn a Certificate in Paralegal Studies by completing 1) an Associate of Arts in Paralegal Studies, 2) a Bachelor of Arts in Paralegal Studies, or 3) a Post baccalaureate Certificate in Paralegal Studies (open to students holding a bachelor’s degree from an accredited college).

Note: Paralegal studies majors with no prior college coursework must take general education courses their first semester. A first-year writing course (ENGL 101 or CSEN 125) is a prerequisite for enrollment in any Paralegal Studies course.

Programs Offered

Journalism

Programs Offered

Journalism Courses

Master of Liberal Arts

Graduate Studies

Description and Policies

Tulane University offers research-oriented graduate programs leading to the degrees of Doctor of Philosophy (Ph.D.), Master of Arts (M.A.), and Master of Science (M.S.) through the Schools of Architecture, Business, Law, Liberal Arts, Medicine, Public Health and Tropical Medicine, Science and Engineering, and Social Work. The Master of Fine Arts degree (M.F.A.) is offered by the School of Liberal Arts. The Master of Liberal Arts (M.L.A.) and the Master of Professional Studies (M.P.R.) programs are offered by the School of Continuing Studies.

The degree of Doctor of Philosophy is offered in the fields of aging studies, anthropology, biomedical engineering, biomedical sciences (biochemistry, human genetics, microbiology and immunology, pharmacology, physiology, and structural and cell biology), business administration (finance and management), cell and molecular biology, chemical and biomolecular engineering, chemistry; city, culture and community; earth and environmental sciences, ecology and evolutionary biology, economic analysis and policy, French studies, history, international development, Latin American studies, Latin American studies and art history, linguistics, mathematics, neuroscience, philosophy, physics, psychology, public health (biostatistics and bioinformatics, epidemiology, global community health and behavioral sciences, global environmental health sciences, global health systems and development, and tropical medicine), and Spanish and Portuguese. A Ph.D. may also be earned in an interdisciplinary field.

The Master of Arts degree is offered in the fields of anthropology, art history, classical studies, French, history, Latin American studies, music (musicology and composition), philosophy, policy economics, political science, and Spanish and Portuguese.

The Master of Science degree is available in the fields of anatomy, biochemistry and molecular biology, bioinformatics, biomedical engineering, biomedical sciences (human genetics, microbiology and immunology, and pharmacology), biostatistics, cell and molecular biology, chemical and biomolecular engineering, chemistry, clinical research, clinical research methods, computational science, disaster resilience leadership studies, earth and environmental sciences, ecology and evolutionary biology, environmental science, epidemiology,  international development, mathematics, neuroscience, physics, psychology, and statistics.

The Master of Fine Arts degree is offered in the fields of art (studio), music (performance), and theatre (design and production).

For information on professional degrees, consult the catalogs of the Schools of Architecture, Business, Continuing Studies, Law,  Medicine, Public Health and Tropical Medicine, and Social Work.

Rules and Regulations
 

Upon admission, students are held responsible for compliance with the regulations Tulane University has set forth in this catalog and in other current or subsequent official statements. They should familiarize themselves with these regulations.

The university reserves the right to change any of its courses and charges without advance notice and to make such changes applicable to students already registered as well as to new students.
 

The Graduate Council

The Graduate Council establishes and maintains university-wide procedures, rules and standards for the Master of Arts (M.A.), Master of Fine Arts (M.F.A.), Master of Liberal Arts (M.L.A.), Master of Science (M.S.) and Doctor of Philosophy (Ph.D.) degree programs. The council approves new degree programs and major curriculum changes in existing programs, performs periodic program reviews, and advises the Senior Vice President for Academic Affairs and Provost on graduate education issues. The voting membership of Graduate Council consists of the Provost, who serves as its chair, and twelve elected faculty members each elected by a vote of the graduate faculty of their respective schools. More details on the council's membership and functions are available at: http://tulane.edu/ogps/graduate-council.cfm.

Graduate and Professional Student Association

The Graduate and Professional Student Association (GAPSA)  is responsible for addressing issues which affect graduate and professional students university-wide, and for allocating budgets for all graduate and professional organizations.  GAPSA's parent body is the Associated Student Body (ASB).

Admission to Degree Programs

Admission to all graduate programs at Tulane is on the basis of academic accomplishments and potential, regardless of race, sex, color, religion, national/ethnic origin, citizenship, marital status, sexual orientation, disability, or veteran status.

Specific admission standards are set by the individual schools, but in general, only applicants who have earned an undergraduate degree from a recognized institution may be admitted if their academic records and personal attributes indicate the ability to pursue advanced study successfully. Applicants must present evidence, to the satisfaction of the department or the program committee concerned, of adequate preparation for the subjects in which they seek to specialize. All students must hold the undergraduate degree before enrolling. Only students with undergraduate averages of B or better, or with undergraduate study of otherwise certifiable equivalent quality, ordinarily are admitted.

A master’s degree is not prerequisite to the beginning of study for the Doctor of Philosophy degree, but a student may be required to qualify for the master’s degree while working toward the doctorate.

Prospective students should consult the graduate admissions offices of their program of interest for additional admission requirements, application deadlines, and degree requirements.

Continuous Registration Requirement

A student admitted in a degree program must be continuously registered in a degree-granting division of the university during the academic year (exclusive of summer session) in either full-time or part-time status (indicated below) from the date of first registration until the awarding of the degree, unless the registration is terminated by resignation or by dismissal for academic or disciplinary reasons.

A student who has not completed the minimum coursework requirements for the degree must either enroll for a minimum of three hours per semester (exclusive of summer session) or register for Master's Research or Dissertation Research in order to maintain continuous registration. A student who has completed the minimum hours of coursework required for the degree must register for Master's Research (no credit hours) or Dissertation Research (no credit hours) in order to maintain continuous registration. Some schools may require registration for a higher number of credit hours or may charge a continuous regisration fee.

Failure to be continuously registered is a de facto withdrawal and the school reserves the right not to readmit.  A student who is readmitted is obligated to pay any applicable fee required to maintain continuous registration. Under exceptional circumstances a student may be granted leave by the dean, and during such period of leave, a student will be considered in continuous registration without payment of fee.

Full-Time Registration Status

Full-time registration status consists of registration for at least nine hours of graduate credit per semester, or a combination of coursework and equivalent academic activities such as teaching or research. Students must be in full-time status for at least one academic year (exclusive of summer session), though some schools and programs may require full-time status for a longer period. To hold a Tulane-sponsored fellowship, scholarship or assistantship, a student must be in full-time status. Off-campus employment may disqualify a student from receiving a Tulane-sponsored fellowship, scholarship, or assistantship.

A student who has completed the minimum hours of coursework required for the degree and is registered for Master's Research (no credit hours) or Dissertation Research (no credit hours) may be classified as a full-time student with full student privileges. Schools, however, may require the department or program committee to certify that the student is engaged in academic activities equivalent to a full-time commitment.

Part-Time Registration Status

Part-time registration status consists of registration for less than nine hours of graduate credit without certification by the department or program committee that the student is engaged in a full-time academic program.

Tenure for Degree Students

Tenure is the maximum period of time normally permitted for the completion of all requirements for a degree, and it is determined on the basis of consecutive academic years from the date of registration for graduate study at Tulane or at another institution. Tenure is not affected by residence status. Under certain circumstances, upon the recommendation of the chairperson of a student’s department or program committee, the dean may extend tenure, but a student whose period of graduate study is unduly prolonged or interrupted may be required to perform additional work. Tenure regulations are applicable to all degree students, regardless of date of first registration. A registration block will be imposed by the school dean for those students who are beyond their time of tenure. The block can only be removed with permission from the dean.

Master’s Degrees

Tenure is five years, although some departments stipulate much earlier completion of all requirements for the degree in their master’s programs.

Ph.D. Degree

Tenure for the Ph.D. degree is seven years.

Registration Policies and Procedures

Registration information for graduate students is the same as that for undergraduate students.

Change of Courses

Students wishing to add or drop courses should consult the Schedule of Classes for deadlines and instructions. Failure to make schedule adjustments promptly and accurately may result in financial or academic penalties.

Change of Departmental Program

A student who has been admitted to a degree program in one department and wishes to transfer to a program in another department must obtain the approval of the chair of both departments concerned and the approval of the dean of the school before the change is official. The necessary form for such changes is available in the dean’s office.

Grades

Grades are reported as follows:

A  
A-  
B+  
B  
B-  
C+ A course in which a grade of C+ or less is earned cannot be counted toward a graduate degree.
C  
C-  
D+  
D  
D-  
F  
I Incomplete – This grade will automatically become F unless the work is made up within 30 days after the beginning of the following semester, excluding Summer School. This grade is not to be used as an automatic extension but only for unavoidable delays caused by illness or other emergencies.
 R Research – In those cases where research or experimentation, or both, cannot be completed within the 30-day limit following the end of the semester, this grade will be given to indicate this circumstance. This grade carries a different meaning from that of IP which is given at the end of the first semester of a two-semester course.
IP  In Progress – Satisfactory progress at the end of the first semester of a year-long course; grades are assigned upon completion of the course.
W Courses may be dropped without record within six weeks of the first day of classes. Refer to Academic Calendar for exact dates each semester. Withdrawals with the grade of W after these dates may be accomplished only if the instructor notifies the dean that the student is passing and recommends permission to withdraw. WF (withdrawn failing) will be assigned if the student’s work in a course is unsatisfactory at the time of withdrawal.
   
 In some departments grades for certain courses are reported as follows:
   
S Satisfactory
U Unsatisfactory

In some departments, grades for certain other designated courses may also be reported simply as S or U at the student’s option, provided that the option is declared by the student no later than the end of the second week of class.

Transfer Credit 

Acceptance of graduate credit for work done at other graduate institutions or in another division of Tulane University must be approved by the department concerned and by the dean of the appropriate school. In general, a maximum of 12 semester hours of transfer credit may be accepted toward a master’s degree, and a maximum of 24 semester hours of transfer credit may be accepted toward the Ph.D. Some schools may allow fewer transfer credits.

Medical Excuses

Students are expected to attend all classes unless they are ill or prevented from attending by exceptional circumstances. Instructors may establish policies for attendance of their classes, which are announced at the beginning of the semester. Students who find it necessary to miss class must assume responsibility for making up the work covered during that session, including quizzes, examinations, and other exercises; they also are responsible for obtaining notes on material covered in lectures or other class sessions.

Students are responsible for notifying professors about absences that result from serious illnesses, injuries, or critical personal problems. However, medical excuses are not issued by the University Health Service, except in instances of illnesses or injuries that involve hospitalization.

Unified Code of Graduate Student Academic Conduct

Tulane University expects students to conduct their academic endeavors with honesty and integrity. As part of the University community, graduate students have certain responsibilities regarding work that forms the basis for the evaluation of their academic achievement. Any student behavior that has the effect of interfering with the education, pursuit of knowledge, and/or a fair evaluation of the student's performance is considered a violation of the proscribed academic conduct, as set forth in the Unified Code of Graduate Student Academic Conduct. The Code also outlines procedures to be followed if there is a suspected violation. Students are expected to be familiar with the Code.   Principles and activities not covered by the Code may fall under the purview of university or departmental research and/or ethics committees. Questions concerning jurisdiction should be addressed to the dean of the respective school. 

Code of Student Conduct

The university requires of all of its students behavior compatible with its high standards of scholarship and conduct. By accepting admission to Tulane University, a student accepts its regulations, including the Code of Student Conduct, and acknowledges the right of the university to take conduct action, including suspension or expulsion, for conduct judged unsatisfactory or disruptive. The Vice President for Student Affairs is responsible for formulating appropriate procedures and, as set forth in the Code of Student Conduct, regulations concerning student behavior and for the resolution of conduct cases.  

Required Withdrawal and Denial of Enrollment

A student may be required to withdraw from any course or from the university, temporarily or permanently, for any of the following reasons:

  1. *Work below the standard specified by the college in which the student is enrolled.
  2. *Violation of the honor system or other misconduct.
  3. *Possibility of danger to the health of the student or to other students if enrollment is continued.

The university reserves the right to forbid any student’s continued enrollment without assignment of reason. The school, however, will provide a student with a statement of reason in writing from the department. An appellate procedure has been established in cases involving academic performance or possible infringement of academic freedom. Schools also have appellate procedures in cases involving non-reappointment of fellowships or scholarships when the formal terms of the first award have given reasonable expectation of renewal. Such procedures may also apply to cases in which a graduate, teaching, or research assistant, is relieved of a position before the end of the term of the appointment or is not reappointed when the formal terms of the first appointment have given reasonable expectation of reappointment. Copies of these procedures are available in the dean’s office.

Resignation from a graduate program must be made in writing to the dean. The student who finds it necessary to withdraw or to resign should report to the dean’s office to complete a withdrawal or resignation form.

Conferring of Degrees

All degrees are conferred by Tulane University. Degrees earned at the graduate level are awarded three times a year in December, May, and August. There is one commencement program each year in May. Candidates for degrees are required to complete an application for degree form on or before deadline dates, as stipulated by each school.

Financial Information

Except as noted below, information regarding tuition and fees, residence halls and meals, financial obligations, financial aid, academic management services, short-term charitable remainder trust, and veteran’s benefits is the same as for undergraduate students. See “Financial Information” for more information.

Tuition and Fees

Tuition and fees rate schedules are established at the university level; however, some fees, such as dissertator fees, are established by the individual schools or programs. Students who have assistantships are often granted tuition waivers, but fees are the responsibility of the student. Consult the graduate adviser of the appropriate school for more information on tuition and fees.

Financial Obligation to the University

No diploma or certificate of credit is given to a student who is in default of any payment due to a division of the university.

Financial Assistance

Tulane's graduate programs award their own scholarships, fellowships, and assistantships. Contact the graduate programs for information on the availability of funds and how to apply. Tulane's Financial Aid Office calculates a student's eligibility for federal aid to supplement awards made by the graduate programs. Note that federal aid decisions for students seeking law degrees are made at the Law Financial Aid Office and those for medical and public health students are made at the Health Sciences Center Financial Aid Office.
 

Programs of Study

The general characteristics of the graduate programs of study are outlined below; but as with admissions, specific requirements for all graduate degrees, including concurrent and dual or joint degrees, may be obtained from the schools in which the programs are to be carried out.  For maximum periods of time to complete requirements for these degrees, see Tenure for Degree Students.

Degree of Doctor of Philosophy
 

Students undertaking work for the degree of Doctor of Philosophy (Ph.D.) should understand that this degree is awarded not for an accumulation of course credits only, but for superior independent research and scholarship in the chosen field, as evidenced in the dissertation.

Residency Requirement

A Ph.D. student must be in residence at Tulane University for at least two semesters.

Minimum Credit Hour Requirement

The minimum credit hour requirement for the Ph.D. is 48 credit hours; however, some programs may require additional hours of coursework.

Dissertation Committee
 

A Ph.D. dissertation committee must consist of at least three faculty members, the majority of whom are Tulane University faculty. Exceptions to this requirement may be made by the school dean.

Prospectus

A Ph.D. student must write a prospectus in order to graduate. Consult with the department or the director of graduate studies for specific requirements related to when and how a prospectus should be completed.

Admission to Candidacy

Admission to a Ph.D. program does not constitute admission to candidacy for the Ph.D. To be admitted to candidacy, a student must complete certain degree requirements, as specified by each school or graduate program. Consult with the department or the director of graduate studies for specific information.

The Dissertation

The dissertation is the culmination of the Ph.D. degree. It is the necessary demonstration that the candidate is worthy of taking a place among research scholars in the discipline. It must demonstrate not only mastery of the literature of the subject, but also the ability to carry on independent research that results in a genuine contribution to knowledge or an original interpretation of existing knowledge, and it must do so in a literate and lucid fashion. The dissertation committee shall pass on the acceptability of the dissertation before it is submitted in final form. Acceptability, however, is not final approval. The candidate must defend the dissertation successfully before the degree is awarded. Consult the dean of the appropriate school or program for regulations regarding formatting of the dissertation and submission deadlines.

Students are required to submit their completed dissertations to Proquest/UMI where it can be copyrighted for a fee. Schools may require students to submit a paper copy of their dissertations. 

Additional Requirements

Schools and graduate programs may have additional requirements for completion of the Ph.D. degree. Students are advised to consult with their appropriate departmental graduate adviser or dean for this information

Degree of Master of Arts

For the Master of Arts degree with thesis, the minimum course requirement is 24 semester hours plus thesis research. For the Master of Arts without thesis, the minimum course requirement is 30 semester hours. Reading knowledge of one modern foreign language pertinent to research in the discipline may be required by the department.

Degree of Master of Science

The requirements for this degree are generally the same as those stated for the Master of Arts degree, but some programs have variations. See Courses of Instruction for specific information.

Degree of Master of Fine Arts

The Master of Fine Arts degree is given through the Departments of Art, Music, and Theatre. The Department of Music requires a minimum of 30 semester hours; the Department of Art requires a minimum of 48 semester hours; and the Department of Theatre requires a minimum of 48 semester hours. A reading knowledge of a foreign language is not required. It is expected that most students will spend a minimum of two years of graduate study in fulfilling the requirements for the Master of Fine Arts degree. For variations in departmental requirements see Courses of Instruction.

4+1 Master's Programs

In some programs, undergraduate students have the option of obtaining a master’s degree with one additional year of study beyond the bachelor’s degree (4+1). Program requirements vary, but most 4+1 degrees do not require a thesis, in which case 30 credit hours of additional coursework beyond the bachelor’s degree are required. Those programs that offer a thesis-based 4+1 option require 24 credit hours of coursework beyond the bachelor’s degree. In some cases, a modified undergraduate curriculum is required to complete the 4+1 program; e.g., substitution of 600- level courses in the senior year that can be applied to both the bachelor’s and master’s degree, so interested students are advised to consult with their school’s graduate adviser prior to their junior year to obtain specific instructions for participation in the 4+1 program. Tuition for the fifth year of the 4+1 program is set by the appropriate school or program.

Degree of Master of Liberal Arts

The Master of Liberal Arts (MLA) program, offered by the School of Continuing Studies, emphasizes graduate-level reading, thinking, and writing in areas that cross disciplinary lines. The program is designed for full-time students as well as part-time students who are usually already established in their careers.  The degree is awarded following the successful completion of ten MLA courses. Although no thesis is required, students who wish to write a thesis in lieu of the tenth course may petition to do so. For course numbers and descriptions, please consult the School of Continuing Studies section of the catalog and the current Schedule of Classes.

Dual Degree Programs 

Tulane University offers a number of dual or joint degrees that are pursued as single coherent program of study. Up to 12 credit hours may be shared between the two degrees to meet Master's degree requirements and up to 24 credit hours may be shared to meet Ph.D. requirements. For joint Ph.D. programs, the requirements of the Ph.D. must be maintained and satisfied in order to receive the Ph.D. degree.