Graduate Studies

Graduate Studies

Description and Policies

Tulane University offers research-oriented graduate programs leading to the degrees of Doctor of Philosophy (Ph.D.), Master of Arts (M.A.), and Master of Science (M.S.). It also offers professionally oriented programs leading to the degree of Master of Business Administration (M.B.A.) and Master of Fine Arts (M.F.A.). The Master of Liberal Arts (M.L.A.) program is offered by the School of Continuing Studies, the continuing education division of Tulane.

The degree of Doctor of Philosophy is offered in the fields of anthropology, biology (cell and molecular biology, evolutionary and environmental biology), biomedical engineering, business administration, chemical science and engineering (chemical engineering, chemistry), earth and environmental sciences, history, Latin American studies, mathematics, medical sciences (anatomy, biostatistics, human genetics, microbiology and immunology, molecular and cellular biology), neuroscience, philosophy, physics, psychology, public health and tropical medicine (biostatistics, epidemiology, international health and development, parasitology), and Spanish. The degree of Doctor of Philosophy may also be earned in an interdisciplinary field.

The Master of Arts degree is offered in the fields of anthropology, art, classical languages, economics, French, history, Latin American studies, mathematics, music, philosophy, political science, Portuguese, sociology, and Spanish.

The Master of Science degree is available in the fields of biochemistry, biology (cell and molecular biology, evolutionary and environmental biology), biomedical engineering, chemical science and engineering (chemical engineering, chemistry), international studies (applied development), earth and environmental sciences, mathematics, medical sciences (anatomy, biostatistics, human genetics, microbiology and immunology, molecular and cellular biology, pharmacology, physiology), neuroscience, physics, psychology, public health and tropical medicine (biostatistics, epidemiology, international health and development, parasitology), and statistics.

The Master of Fine Arts degree is offered in the fields of art, music, and theatre. For graduate degrees other than those cited above, consult the catalogs of the School of Architecture, the School of Business, the School of Law, the School of Medicine, the School of Public Health and Tropical Medicine, the School of Science and Engineering, and the School of Social Work.

Graduate work was first provided at Tulane University in 1883-1884. Under several different names and forms of administration, graduate work continued to develop. Four students received Master of Arts degrees in 1885, and the first Doctor of Philosophy degree was conferred in 1887. In 1925 the Faculty of Graduate Studies became the Graduate School. With the renewal of the university in 2006 all graduate programs were returned to their respective schools. Graduate studies are administered by the deans of the respective schools. At the departmental level, the graduate chair is the officer responsible to the dean for the administration of graduate affairs.

The following is a complete listing of all graduate degrees offered:

  Juris Doctor (J.D.)
  Master of Accounting (M.Acct.)
  Master of Architecture (M.Arch.)
  Master of Arts (M.A.)
  Master of Business Administration (M.B.A.)
  Master of Finance (M.Fin.)
  Master of Fine Arts (M.F.A.)
  Master of Health Administration (M.H.A.)
  Master of Laws (LL.M.)
  Master of Liberal Arts (M.L.A.)
  Master of Medical Management (M.M.M.)
  Master of Preservation Studies (M.P.S.)
  Master of Public Health (M.P.H.)
  Master of Public Health and Tropical Medicine (M.P.H.T.M.)
  Master of Science (M.S.)
  Master of Social Work (M.S.W.)
  Doctor of Medicine (M.D.)
  Doctor of Philosophy (Ph.D.)
  Doctor of Public Health (Dr.P.H.)

The Graduate Council

The Graduate Council consists of the Associate Senior Vice President for Research as chair and 10 elected faculty members. The Graduate Council approves the formation and termination of, and curricular changes in, all graduate programs. It also establishes and maintains rules, procedures, and standards governing these programs, and initiates reviews of all graduate programs. Details on the membership and functions of the Graduate Council are available in the Constitution of the Graduate Council.

Graduate Student Association

All graduate students are members of the Graduate School Student Association (GSSA), which is governed by an Executive Committee consisting of six Student Associates and the graduate student senators to the Associated Student Body (ASB). A copy of the GSSA Constitution is available on-line at www.tulane.edu/~gssa/.

Admission to Degree Programs

Admission to all graduate programs at Tulane is on the basis of academic accomplishments and potential, regardless of race, sex, color, religion, national/ethnic origin, citizenship, marital status, sexual orientation, disability, or veteran status.

Specific admission standards are set by the individual schools, but in general, only applicants who have earned an undergraduate degree from a recognized institution may be admitted if their academic records and personal attributes indicate the ability to pursue advanced study successfully. Applicants must present evidence, to the satisfaction of the department or the program committee concerned, of adequate preparation for the subjects in which they seek to specialize. All students must hold the undergraduate degree before enrolling. Only students with undergraduate averages of B or better, or with undergraduate study of otherwise certifiable equivalent quality, ordinarily are admitted.

A master’s degree is not prerequisite to the beginning of study for the Doctor of Philosophy degree, but a student may be required to qualify for the master’s degree while working toward the doctorate.

Prospective students should consult the graduate admissions offices of their program of interest for additional admission requirements, application deadlines, and degree requirements.

Foreign Students

A foreign applicant for admission must present satisfactory evidence of sufficient competence in English to read it, write it, speak it, and understand it when spoken. Ordinarily, the applicant will demonstrate competence by presenting an acceptable score on TSE (Test of Spoken English), normally a minimum score of 220. If TSE is not available in the applicant’s area of the world, TOEFL (Test of English as a Foreign Language) may be taken instead, with a minimum score of 600 acceptable for admission. For information about these exams, visit www.ets.org.

An applicant whose competence in English is unproven or insufficient may be admitted with probationary status on the condition that competence will be proven or improved. The student may be required to prove competence by earning an acceptable score on a test of English (either TSE, TOEFL, or a Tulane University test). A student who scores below the acceptable level of competence may be required to register for less than a full graduate program and to take English as a Second Language instruction without credit until the student’s competence is certified. A foreign applicant is also required to take the Graduate Record Examination.

Graduate Record Examination

Applicants for admission must take at their own expense the General Test of the Graduate Record Examination. Certain departments also require the Subject Test. Please consult the department. The test scores will be used, with other data, to determine eligibility for admission and to aid in counseling the applicant after admission. Students should contact Educational Testing Service for more information regarding the GRE at www.gre.org.

Rules and Regulations

Upon admission, students are held responsible for compliance with the regulations Tulane University has set forth in this catalog and in other current or subsequent official statements. They should familiarize themselves with these regulations.

The university reserves the right to change any of its courses and charges without advance notice and to make such changes applicable to students already registered as well as to new students.

General Requirements

A student admitted in a degree program must be continuously registered in a degree-granting division of the university during the academic year (exclusive of summer session) in one of the two registration statuses indicated below from the date of first registration until the awarding of the degree, unless the registration is terminated by resignation or by dismissal for academic or disciplinary reasons. Under exceptional circumstances a student may be granted leave by the dean, and during such period of leave, a student will be considered in continuous registration without payment of fee.

Full-Time Residence Status

To hold a fellowship or scholarship or any of the various kinds of assistantships, a student must be registered in full-time residence status. To determine student privileges and assess tuition and fees, a student in full-time residence status must be registered for at least nine hours of graduate credit per semester, or a combination of coursework and equivalent academic activities such as teaching or research.

After the student has completed the minimum hours of coursework required for the degree, the student can be classified as a full-time student entitled to full student privileges. The student must register for master’s or dissertation research and the department or program committee must certify that the student is engaged in academic activities equivalent to full-time residence commitment. Any off-campus employment for remuneration may disqualify a student from receiving graduate level financial aid.

Part-Time Residence Status

For the purposes of determination of student privileges and for the assessment of tuition and fees, a student in part-time residence status is any student who is registered for less than nine hours of graduate credit and who is not certified by the department or the program committee as taking a total academic program. Note: Continuous registration requirements, see the appropriate section.

Tenure for Degree Students

Tenure is the maximum period of time normally permitted for the completion of all requirements for a degree, and it is determined on the basis of consecutive academic years from the date of registration for graduate study at Tulane or at another institution. Tenure is not affected by residence status. Under certain circumstances, upon the recommendation of the chairperson of a student’s department or program committee, the dean may extend tenure, but a student whose period of graduate study is unduly prolonged or interrupted may be required to perform additional work. Tenure regulations are applicable to all degree students, regardless of date of first registration.

Master’s Degrees

Tenure is five years, although some departments stipulate much earlier completion of all requirements for the degree in their master’s programs.

Ph.D. Degree

Tenure is seven years, but completion of all requirements for the Ph.D. degree within four years of study is strongly encouraged.

Continuous Registration Requirements

A student admitted in a degree program must be in continuous registration in a degree-granting division of the university until the awarding of the degree. Any student who is not registered for coursework in a degree-granting division of the university must be registered in Master’s Research or Dissertation Research in order to remain in continuous registration. The student need not maintain registration during the summer session. The continuous registration requirement applies both to resident and nonresident students. Resident students who have not completed minimum coursework requirements for their degrees must either enroll for a minimum of three hours per semester (exclusive of Summer Session) or register for Master’s Research (998) or Dissertation Research (999). Resident or nonresident students who have completed their coursework requirements are required to register for Master’s Research (998) (no credit hours) or Dissertation Research (999) (no credit hours) in order to maintain continuous registration. This entitles students to full-student privileges. Failure to be so registered is de facto withdrawal and the school reserves the right not to readmit. A student who is readmitted is obligated to pay the applicable fee required to maintain continuous registration.

Registration Policies and Procedures

Registration information for graduate students is the same as that for undergraduate students.

Change of Courses

Students wishing to add or drop courses should consult the Schedule of Classes for deadlines and instructions. Failure to make schedule adjustments promptly and accurately may result in financial or academic penalties.

Change of Departmental Program

A student who has been admitted to a degree program in one department and wishes to transfer to a program in another department must obtain the approval of the chair of both departments concerned and the approval of the dean of the school before the change is official. The necessary form for such changes is available in the dean’s office.

Grades

Grades are reported as follows:

A  
A-  
B+  
B  
B-  
C+ A course in which a grade of C+ or less is earned cannot be counted toward a graduate degree.
C  
C-  
D+  
D  
D-  
F  
I Incomplete – This grade will automatically become F unless the work is made up within 30 days after the beginning of the following semester, excluding Summer School. This grade is not to be used as an automatic extension but only for unavoidable delays caused by illness or other emergencies.
 R Research – In those cases where research or experimentation, or both, cannot be completed within the 30-day limit following the end of the semester, this grade will be given to indicate this circumstance. This grade carries a different meaning from that of IP which is given at the end of the first semester of a two-semester course.
IP  In Progress – Satisfactory progress at the end of the first semester of a year-long course; grades are assigned upon completion of the course.
W Courses may be dropped without record within six weeks of the first day of classes. Refer to Academic Calendar for exact dates each semester. Withdrawals with the grade of W after these dates may be accomplished only if the instructor notifies the dean that the student is passing and recommends permission to withdraw. WF (withdrawn fail-ing) will be assigned if the student’s work in a course is unsatisfactory at the time of withdrawal.
   
 In some departments grades for certain courses are reported as follows:
   
S Satisfactory
U Unsatisfactory

In some departments, grades for certain other designated courses may also be reported simply as S or U at the student’s option, provided that the option is declared by the student no later than the end of the second week of class.

Medical Excuses

Students are expected to attend all classes unless they are ill or prevented from attending by exceptional circumstances. Instructors may establish policies for attendance of their classes, which are announced at the beginning of the semester. Students who find it necessary to miss class must assume responsibility for making up the work covered during that session, including quizzes, examinations, and other exercises; they also are responsible for obtaining notes on material covered in lectures or other class sessions.

Students are responsible for notifying professors about absences that result from serious illnesses, injuries, or critical personal problems. However, medical excuses are not issued by the University Health Service, except in instances of illnesses or injuries that involve hospitalization.

Policy on Intellectual Property

The university policy on intellectual property applies to all graduate students. Any invention or discovery resulting from projects supported in whole or in part by funds, personnel, or facilities provided by or administered by the Board of Administrators of Tulane University is the property of Tulane University. The university has a policy of sharing with the inventor any income derived from such discoveries. For more information on Tulane’s policy, see "Intellectual Property Policy and Procedures" on the Office of Technology Transfer and Business Development website www.som.tulane.edu/departments/techdev/OTD.html.

Code of Academic Conduct

Tulane University expects students to conduct their academic endeavors with honesty and integrity. Activities covered by the Code of Academic Conduct include coursework, examinations, and research. This Code of Academic Conduct outlines individual responsibilities as well as procedures to be followed if there is a question concerning a student’s academic honesty or integrity. All students enrolled are subject to these regulations and should be familiar with the Code of Academic Conduct, a copy of which is available on the Tulane University website. Principles and activities not covered by this Code of Academic Conduct may fall under the purview of university or departmental research and/or ethics committees. Questions concerning jurisdiction should be addressed to the dean of the respective school.

Transfer Credit

Acceptance of graduate credit for work done at other graduate institutions or in another division of Tulane University must be approved by the department concerned and by the dean of the appropriate school. In general, up to 12 semester hours of transfer credit may be accepted toward a master’s degree, and up to 24 semester hours of transfer credit may be accepted toward the Ph.D.

Required Withdrawal and Denial of Enrollment

A student may be required to withdraw from any course or from the university, temporarily or permanently, for any of the following reasons:

  1. Work below the standard specified by the college in which the student is enrolled.
  2. Violation of the honor system or other misconduct.
  3. Possibility of danger to the health of the student or to other students if enrollment is continued.

The university reserves the right to forbid any student’s continued enrollment without assignment of reason. The school, however, will provide a student with a statement of reason in writing from the department. An appellate procedure has been established in cases involving academic performance or possible infringement of academic freedom. Schools also have appellate procedures in cases involving non-reappointment of fellowships or scholarships when the formal terms of the first award have given reasonable expectation of renewal. Such procedures may also apply to cases in which a graduate, teaching, or research assistant, is relieved of a position before the end of the term of the appointment or is not reappointed when the formal terms of the first appointment have given reasonable expectation of reappointment. Copies of these procedures are available in the dean’s office.

Resignation from a graduate program must be made in writing to the dean. The student who finds it necessary to withdraw or to resign should report to the dean’s office to complete a withdrawal or resignation form.

Code of Student Conduct

The university requires of all of its students behavior compatible with its high standards of scholarship and conduct. The Vice President for Student Affairs is responsible for formulating appropriate procedures and regulations concerning student behavior and for the judicial consideration of violations. A copy of the Code of Student Conduct is available in the Office of Student Affairs and in the Graduate School office.

Conferring of Degrees

Degrees earned at the graduate level are awarded three times a year–in December, May, and August. There is only one commencement program and that is held in May. A candidate must be present to receive the degree unless the candidate has been excused by the dean. A request to receive a degree in absentia must be filed in the dean’s office at the time the diploma form is submitted. Candidates for degrees are required to complete an application for degree form on or before deadline dates.

Financial Information

Except as noted below, information regarding tuition and fees, residence halls and meals, financial obligations, financial aid, academic management services, short-term charitable remainder trust, and veteran’s benefits is the same as for undergraduate students. See “Financial Information” for more information.

Tuition and Fees

Tuition and fees rate schedules are established at the university level; however, some fees, such as dissertator fees, are established by the individual schools or programs. Students who have assistantships are often granted tuition waivers, but fees are the responsibility of the student. Consult the graduate adviser of the appropriate school for more information on tuition and fees.

Financial Obligation to the University

No diploma or certificate of credit is given to a student who is in default of any payment due to a division of the university.

Financial Assistance

Financial support for graduate students is awarded by the school primarily on the basis of academic merit. Candidates for aid must ordinarily present a combined GRE verbal and quantitative score of at least 1100 and an undergraduate GPA of 3.200 or better. Financial assistance is available in the form of tuition scholarships, part-time teaching or research assistantships, fellowships, or combinations of these awards. Ordinarily, the school will not award financial aid for the pursuit of a second Tulane degree at the same level, e.g., a second master’s degree from Tulane.

To hold a fellowship or scholarship or any of the various kinds of assistantships, a student not only must be registered in full-time residence status but also must maintain an academic level of performance satisfactory to both the department and to the dean. Any other employment for remuneration may disqualify a student from receiving graduate financial aid.

If a student is applying for financial assistance, the completed application materials must be received no later than February 1. Notice of awards will be sent out on or about March 15. Award decisions cannot be made on incomplete applications.

Loan Funds

In addition to most forms of financial aid available to undergraduate students, graduate students are also eligible to borrow up to $10,000 annually in additional unsubsidized Stafford Loans if they are enrolled at least half time and are U.S. citizens or permanent residents. Although a needs test is not required, applicants must have their eligibility for a subsidized Stafford Loan determined before applying for the unsubsidized loan. Additional information is available from hometown lenders or the Office of Financial Aid. Other nonneed-based loans that may be available to credit-worthy students are the Graduate Access Loan through National City Bank, the GradExcel Program sponsored by Nellie Mae, the Education Resources Institute (TERI), CitiAssist Loan, Educaid, Sallie Mae Signature Loans, and PNC Bank Loans.

Short-term loans are available to provide for emergencies that may arise during the academic year. Ordinarily these loans are restricted to one per academic year, with a maximum of $175, and repayment is expected by the end of the semester. Short-term loans are available only during the fall and spring semesters. Applications may be obtained from the Student Loan Office. For more information, see the Graduate and Professional Financial Aid Brochure which is available from the Office of Financial Aid.

Housing and Meals

University housing for graduate students is limited and is allotted on a first come, first served basis. Graduate students and family applicants are able to apply for apartment living at the Papillon apartments in the Lower Garden District. There is usually a waiting list for these facilities so applications should be submitted early. For more information, see Tulane’s Graduate Student and Family Housing website: housing.tulane.edu/gradhouse.html

To locate off-campus housing, plan to arrive in New Orleans at least two weeks in advance of registration or sooner, if possible. The campus is in a residential area and a variety of accommodations are usually available. For information concerning housing, contact: Division of Student Affairs website at www.tulane.edu/~housing/off.html

Parking on campus is available for a nominal yearly fee. Details concerning parking stickers will be handled at registration. New Orleans has excellent public transportation, including the St. Charles Avenue streetcar, one of the few electric streetcars still in operation in the United States. The streetcar, as well as many bus lines, connects the Tulane campus with the Garden District, the Central Business District, and the French Quarter.

Meals are available on campus on a contract basis at Bruff Commons or on a cash basis at the university Center cafeteria and snack bar. There are a number of inexpensive restaurants located within walking distance of campus. For information concerning the university food service, visit www.diningservices.tulane.edu.

Student Life and Resources

Graduate students are afforded the same benefits and access to student life resources as undergraduate students. For more information on the Student Health Center, educational resources and counseling, the Career Services Center, technology services, libraries, co-curricular activities, and recreational facilities, consult these previous sections of the catalog.

Additional Research Facilities

In addition to the academic resources listed in the previous section, there are several research centers at Tulane that may be of use to graduate students in their studies. The university-wide centers are described below; however, many schools and programs have their own centers that provide access to specialized equipment, archives, and faculty expertise.

Amistad Research Center

Tulane is host to the Amistad Research Center, a privately supported institution established to collect, preserve, and make available primary source materials pertaining to the history of America’s ethnic minorities, race relations, and civil rights. Founded by the American Missionary Association in 1966, Amistad has collected more than ten million manuscript pieces and historical documents, 300,000 photographs, 400 tapes of speeches and interviews, 19,000 reference books, runs of 39 newspapers and 874 periodicals, one million newspaper clippings, and 15,000 pamphlets. The archives contain the official files of some 70 national and international organizations, such as the American Missionary Association, American Committee on Africa, Free Southern Theatre, National Association of Human Rights Workers, and Operations Crossroads Africa.

Among the more than 200 families and individuals represented in the correspondence files of Amistad are Booker T. Washington, W.E.B. DuBois, Martin Luther King, Jr., Thurgood Marshall, Countee Cullen, and Fletcher Henderson. About 80% of the holdings deal primarily with the history and culture of black Americans, civil rights, and relations between blacks and whites. The Amistad Center also holds the Aaron Douglas Collection, an art collection of more than 200 paintings, sculptures, drawings, graphics, and other works by major Afro-American artists.

The center offers the New Orleans community art and history exhibits, concerts, lectures, poetry readings, and other public programs. Located in the Tilton Memorial Hall, the Amistad Center is open to the public.

The Hebert Center

The Tulane Riverside Research Laboratories at the 500-acre Hebert Center near Belle Chasse, Louisiana, house the Meade Library of Natural History and the Tulane Museum of Natural History, one of seven major ichthyological research centers in the United States. It provides special facilities for advanced research and graduate training in such areas as behavioral psychology, bioengineering, developmental biology, environmental biology, environmental health sciences, and medicine.

Tulane National Primate Research Center

The Tulane National Primate Research Center, established in 1962 under the auspices of the National Institutes of Health, occupies a 500-acre tract near Covington, Louisiana, across Lake Pontchartrain from New Orleans. The center is operated by Tulane, with other universities and research institutions participating in various programs. It is dedicated to the use of nonhuman primates in a wide range of biomedical research programs including bacteriology, molecular biology, immunology, neurobiology, parasitology, reproductive physiology, urology, and virology. The center uses monkeys of 11 different species and currently has about 4,800 nonhuman primates.

In addition to the research programs the center has a breeding program for rhesus monkeys. These animals are held in field cages providing seminatural habitats. Opportunities are available for advanced students to participate in various aspects of primate research.

Center for Archaeology

The Center for Archaeology provides a range of support for Tulane-affiliated archaeological research. Located in the anthropology building, the center offers organizational and financial support, as well as equipment and laboratory facilities, for faculty and student research projects. Continuing programs include a grants-in-aid program for meritorious student and faculty projects; sponsorship of scholarly conferences and symposia; curation of archaeological site collections from North America and teaching collections from other areas; and a “Lectures in Archaeology” series, which brings outstanding scholars to Tulane to present public lectures on topics of broad interest.

The center’s associates include professional archaeologists both from within and outside the Tulane faculty. Graduate students may be considered for appointment as research affiliates while their research projects are linked to or supported by the center.

Middle American Research Institute

Established in 1924, the Middle American Research Institute is devoted to research, publication, graduate and undergraduate instruction relating to Mexico and Central America, and the maintenance of an exhibit gallery and collections. The anthropological collections include archaeological materials from the Americas, especially Central America, Mexico, and the southwestern United States; ethnographic specimens; negatives, photographs and slides; and documentary research materials from archaeological expeditions. The institute issues scholarly publications that relate to Middle America. Volumes issued in recent years have concentrated on anthropology, and especially the archaeology and the ancient writings of Middle American Indians. Past publications have dealt with art history, botany, drama, economics, ethnography, history, linguistics, literature, malacology, physical anthropology, political science, social anthropology, sociology, and theatre. In addition to its own series of about 65 volumes and 20 shorter monographs and reports, MARI assembled and edited a 16-volume Handbook of Middle American Indians. From the late 1950s into the 1970s, MARI undertook a program of archaeological research in the Maya area of Yucatan, Campeche, and Quintana Roo, México, investigating several important sites, the largest of which were Dzibilchaltún in Yucatán, Becán in Campeche, and Xcaret in Quintana Roo. In the early 1980s, the institute was involved with survey, excavations, and analysis of the early Maya site of Komchén, in northwest Yucatán. Since 1990, MARl has been conducting extensive excavations in the elite residential zone at the Classic Maya site of Cópan, in Honduras. Each year the institute provides field research funding in Latin America for about 15 Tulane archaeology graduate students. The institute museum gallery is open to the public. Its collections are available for study to qualified scholars and students at Tulane and elsewhere.

Stone Center For Latin American Studies

The Center for Latin American Studies is one of 14 federally funded programs of its sort in the United States. The Gourman Report recently ranked it among the top two such programs in the country. It coordinates the activities of over 80 faculty who offer some 150 courses on Latin America. Graduate students enrolled in the center’s interdisciplinary programs have at their disposal the unique resources of the Latin American Library, the Middle American Research Institute, the Cuban Studies Institute, and the Mesoamerican Ecology Institute. In addition, the center offers numerous opportunities for student field experience in Latin America, both through credit-granting summer sessions in Mexico and through grants for independent research. Currently the center is funding approximately 50 graduate field research projects per year.

The center’s curriculum permits students to design concentrations within a broad interdisciplinary framework. Graduates generally pursue careers in business, government, research, or teaching. The center offers the following degree programs: Master of Arts in Latin American Studies, joint degree program in Law and Latin American Studies leading to degrees of Master of Civil Law and Master of Arts in Latin American Studies, joint degree program leading to the Master of Arts in Latin American Studies and the Master of Business Administration in International Business (in conjunction with the A. B. Freeman School of Business), Ph.D. minor in Latin American Studies (with cooperating departments), and Ph.D. in Latin American Studies.

Center For Bioenvironmental Research

The Center for Bioenvironmental Research, established in 1989, provides a wide range of support for Tulane University faculty. The center offers administrative and financial support, and maintains core facilities for major instrumentation, as part of a multidisciplinary program aimed at understanding and mitigating the impact of synthetic and natural occurring environmental agents on human and ecosystem health. The center supports and sponsors technical workshops, as well as scholarly conferences and symposia, and serves as a focal point for investigating the role of science in establishing efficient and effective environmental policy.

The center’s associates include faculty in business, engineering, environmental health sciences, epidemiology, law, medicine, public health, and the sciences. Graduate students in various departments may be supported by the center through programs including those for underrepresented individuals of the university community.

Murphy Institute of Political Economy

In 1980 Tulane University established the Murphy Institute of Political Economy to enable scholars to study the interrelationships between politics and economics. The institute supports an interdisciplinary undergraduate program in political economy which brings together faculty from the Departments of Economics, Political Science, History, and Philosophy. All participants are committed to a common search for new insights and new ways of studying the interrelations of politics and economics that transcend the traditional disciplinary boundaries.
The Murphy Institute hosts lectures and seminars by prominent visiting scholars and public figures. These programs bring prominent scholars to Tulane to share their research and provide students and faculty an opportunity to study with leading scholars in the field of political economy. The institute also supports graduate students interested in political economy.

South Central Center of the National Institute For Global Environmental Change

The South Central Center of the National Institute for Global Environmental Change was established at Tulane University along with centers at Harvard, Indiana University, the University of California (Davis campus), the University of Alabama, and the University of Nebraska. The purpose of the institute is to perform interdisciplinary research concerning global change, principally that causing and resulting from climatic change. The institute’s research will serve to improve scientific understanding of global environmental and climatic change mechanisms, and improve assessments of the potential impacts of regional conditions in the next century. The institute will also develop innovative observational programs of regional or ecosystem scale processes contributing to global change, and formulate policy and decision tools pertinent to global environmental change. The center affords researchers the opportunity to interact with a diverse faculty in a broad range of disciplines.

Oak Ridge Associated Universities Consortium

Oak Ridge Associated Universities (ORAU) is a private, not-for-profit consortium of 65 colleges and universities and a management and operating contractor for the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) with principal offices located in Oak Ridge, Tennessee. Founded in 1946, ORAU provides and develops capabilities critical to the nation’s technology infrastructure, particularly in energy, education, health, and the environment. ORAU works with and for its member institutions to help faculty and students gain access to federal research facilities; to keep members informed about opportunities for fellowship, scholarship, and research appointments; and to organize research alliances among its members in areas where their collective strengths can be focused on issues of national importance.

Newcomb College Center For Research on Women

The Newcomb College Center for Research on Women is one of the nation’s oldest and most prominent of its kind. Founded in 1975, its central mission is to facilitate research and curriculum development in women’s studies. The center serves as the centralized repository for women’s studies books and periodicals, containing some 7,000 volumes and more than 100 periodicals. Specializations include women’s education, the history of Southern women, labor, and culinary arts. The archives of the center houses Newcomb College records, women’s papers, a large collection of oral history tapes, and photographs, scrapbooks and other materials useful to scholars.

The Women’s Studies Grant Program awards funds to assist with the costs of conducting research on topics relating to women or gender. The center also provides a forum for the exchange of knowledge about women through scholarship and a full schedule of lectures, seminars, and faculty colloquia.

The Payson Center For International Development and Technology Transfer

The center is organized as a scholarly international community with three focus areas. The first is the traditional role of teaching and learning. Within this area, center members offer short courses, longer-term training and teaching in the Master’s of Applied Development program and interdisciplinary Ph.D. programs, and contribute to other parts of the university. The center emphasizes a strong element of practical information technology use in every teaching program. The second area of focus is research and evaluation on elements of the computer-assisted learning process and the general impact of technology on development and society. Within this area the center is also engaging in research on modeling learning behavior and measuring the impact of new instructional technology on learning. Research into technology transfer, innovation and modernization with a particular emphasis on communication and telecommunications modes constitute part of the center’s focus. An overriding interest in things international and cross-cultural forms an integral part of the curriculum lending a unique flavor and focus to all center activities within the university community.

The final component of Payson Center activity is geared toward the actual creation of information technology training products. The design, development and production of multimedia course and presentation modules make up an important practical element of the center’s activities. This program of study is oriented toward real problems and is centered on the needs of the learner, all via information technology.

Foreign Exchange Program

Tulane University participates in an exchange program with the Free University of Berlin, Germany, which offers the exchange student a stipend plus tuition for one academic year. Transportation to and from Europe is the responsibility of the student. Applicants interested in this program can obtain additional information from their graduate deans.

Programs of Study

The most common programs of study for graduate degrees at Tulane are: 1) approved 4 + 1 master’s, 2) thesis master’s, 3) non-thesis masters, 4) M.S.-M.D. and Ph.D.-M.D., and 4) the Ph.D. The general characteristics of each program of study are outlined below; but as with admissions, specific requirements for all of graduate degrees may be obtained from the school in which the programs are to be carried out.

For master’s degree programs, the minimum requirement is 24 semester hours plus thesis or equivalent. For M.A. and M.S. programs, one academic year must be in full-time residence status or its equivalent part-time study. For M.F.A. programs, the resident study requirement is the same except that upon the recommendation of the student’s department or program chair and approval of the dean, work taken in Tulane summer session may be considered resident study. For Ph.D. programs, the minimum requirement is 48 semester hours and a dissertation. One academic year must be in full-time residence status. For maximum periods of time to complete requirements for any of these degrees see Tenure for Degree Students.

The graduate student’s entire program of study will often be within a single department. In some cases, however, a student may take some of the work outside the major department with the approval of the chair of both the major department and the other department or departments concerned. Occasionally, the needs of individual students may require a special interdisciplinary Ph.D. program. For further information see Special Interdisciplinary Programs.

In addition, Tulane University offers the qualified student the opportunity to work toward two different degrees concurrently. For information on the joint-degree program leading toward a Master of Arts in Latin American Studies and a Master of Civil Law and the joint-degree program leading to a Master of Business Administration and a Master of Arts in Latin American Studies, contact the Center for Latin American Studies. The Master of Arts in Political Science can be earned concurrently with a Tulane law degree. The Department of Political Science should be contacted for additional information. The joint programs leading toward the degree of Doctor of Medicine and either the Master of Science or the Doctor of Philosophy degrees in the basic medical sciences are described in this section.

Degree of Master of Arts

For the Master of Arts degree with thesis, the minimum course requirement is 24 semester hours plus thesis research. For the Master of Arts without thesis, the minimum course requirement is 30 semester hours. Reading knowledge of one modern foreign language pertinent to research in the discipline may be required by the department.

Degree of Masters of Science

The requirements for this degree are generally the same as those stated for the Master of Arts degree, but some programs have variations. See Courses of Instruction for specific information.

Degree of Master of Fine Arts

The Master of Fine Arts degree is given through the Departments of Art, Music, and Theatre. The Department of Music requires a minimum of 30 semester hours; the Department of Art requires a minimum of 48 semester hours; and the Department of Theatre requires a minimum of 48 semester hours. A reading knowledge of a foreign language is not required. It is expected that most students will spend a minimum of two years of graduate study in fulfilling the requirements for the Master of Fine Arts degree. For variations in departmental requirements see Courses of Instruction.

4+1 Master's Programs

In some programs, undergraduate students have the option of obtaining a master’s degree with one additional year of study beyond the bachelor’s degree (4+1). Program requirements vary, but most 4+1 degrees do not require a thesis, in which case 30 credit hours of additional coursework beyond the bachelor’s degree are required. Those programs that offer a thesis-based 4+1 option require 24 credit hours of coursework beyond the bachelor’s degree. In some cases, a modified undergraduate curriculum is required to complete the 4+1 program; e.g., substitution of 600- level courses in the senior year that can be applied to both the bachelor’s and master’s degree, so interested students are advised to consult with their school’s graduate adviser prior to their junior year to obtain specific instructions for participation in the 4+1 program. Tuition for the fifth year of the 4+1 program is set by the appropriate school or program.

Degree of Master of Liberal Arts

The Master of Liberal Arts program emphasizes graduate-level reading, thinking, and writing in areas that cross disciplinary lines. The program is designed for full-time students as well as part-time students who are usually already established in their careers. To encourage learning as a continuing challenge, it features the intensity of classroom discussion, the excitement of confronting new ideas, and the advantages of an academic environment. The program draws on the intellectual resources of faculty members from a wide variety of departments who enjoy approaching their academic disciplines from a new direction.

The Master of Liberal Arts program is offered by the School of Continuing Studies. To enroll in the program, a student must first apply to the School of Continuing Studies for admission as a part-time graduate student. Requirements for the degree include completion of two core courses within a single track and seven other graduate-level courses. In addition to the two core courses, seven elective courses drawn from the offerings are required; additional core courses may be taken as electives. During the evening each semester the university offers a broad range of courses in English, history, philosophy, sociology, foreign languages, and literature, among others, which are open to M.L.A. students. Special courses designed exclusively for M.L.A. students are also offered as electives. Finally, completion of a project, normally a thesis, related to the theme of the student’s track or educational plan is required.

After completion of the two core courses, the student is eligible to transfer from the School of Continuing Studies to the school which actually confers the degree. For course numbers and descriptions of the core courses and special offerings, please consult the School of Continuing Studies section of the catalog and the current Schedule of Classes.

M.S.-M.D. and PH.D.-M.D. Programs

In order to enter either of these programs, a student must first be admitted to the Tulane School of Medicine and then must apply for admission to the appropriate school. For a full description of either program, see the School of Medicine catalog. In respect to the graduate component of these programs, the requirements concerning continuous registration, status, student privileges, tenure, and special fees are the same as for any other master’s degree or Ph.D. degree program, as are the requirements for minimum hours of coursework, research requirements, qualifying examinations, and thesis or dissertation.

The advantages of these combined degree programs lie, however, in the fact that up to 12 semester hours of credit for courses leading toward the M.D. may be transferred to meet the M.S. requirements and up to 24 semester hours of credit to meet the Ph.D. requirements. The programs of study are pursued concurrently as a single coherent program.

Thesis Requirements

The subject of the thesis for all master’s degrees must be in the field of major study and must have the approval of the professor by whom the thesis is to be directed. The finished thesis must have the approval of a committee appointed by the university chair of the department. The director of the thesis will serve as chair of the thesis committee. At the request of the director, a member of some other department may be added to the committee. Consult the graduate adviser of the appropriate school or program for specific thesis requirements and submission deadlines.

Degree of Doctor of Philosophy

Students undertaking work for the degree of Doctor of Philosophy should understand that this degree is awarded not for an accumulation of course credits only, but for superior attainment and accomplishment. Ordinarily the student is expected to finish the course requirements in two full years of graduate study and complete the dissertation by the fourth year. The student must demonstrate in independent study and research, as evidenced in the dissertation, the ability to carry out an original investigation in the chosen field. A minimum of one year full-time study in residence at Tulane University is required.

Course Requirements

The minimum course requirements are usually 48 semester hours; however, students should refer to the specific departmental requirements. Where necessary, a department will require additional hours of coursework.

Students ordinarily must complete the requirements for the Ph.D. degree within seven years from the date of matriculation. Only in unusual cases, with the approval of the department chair and the dean, will credit be approved for courses taken more than six years before first registration for graduate work.

Additional Requirements

For additional language, general examination, preliminary examination and qualifying examination requirements, please consult with the departmental graduate adviser or dean of the appropriate school or program.

Prospectus and Dissertation Committee

A student should choose a dissertation topic or project in consultation with a qualified faculty member in the major department who will undertake to direct the dissertation. With a topic or project agreed on, the department chair appoints a committee of at least three members, with the director as chair, to serve as a prospectus committee. If the prospectus is approved by this committee and the dean, the prospectus committee will serve as the dissertation committee. Normally the student’s prospectus-dissertation committee consists of members of the major department, but, with the approval of the dean, the department chair may appoint a member from another department or even a faculty member from another institution. The approval of the prospectus as described above also serves as approval of the committee.

The responsibilities of the dissertation committee are specified below under Dissertation and Final Examination.

Prospectus

Until a student’s prospectus has been approved by the prospectus committee and the dean, dissertation work has no official status. Normally, a student will not submit a prospectus until the student has completed course requirements, satisfied the foreign language and research requirements, and passed the general examination. Upon the recommendation of the department, however, the student may submit a prospectus any time after completion of one year of full-time residence. The department recommendation for approval of the prospectus should include three copies of the prospectus itself. The prospectus should be approximately three doubled-spaced typewritten pages. The cover sheet should state the student’s name, department, the title of the proposed dissertation, and the name of the chair and the other members of the committee. The introduction of the prospectus should contain a summary of earlier work on the problem. The body should include an orderly description of the plan for the investigation. The conclusion should clearly state the anticipated nature of the investigation results. Major sources of information should be indicated and a selective bibliography attached.

Admission to Candidacy

Admission to a Ph.D. program does not constitute official admission to candidacy for the Ph.D. To be admitted officially to candidacy for the Ph.D., a student must have completed course requirements, satisfied foreign language and research requirements, passed general examinations, and submitted a prospectus of the dissertation approved by the student’s dissertation committee and the dean. The recommendation for admission to candidacy is made by the department and must bear the signatures of both the chair of the student’s dissertation committee and the chair of the department. The recommendation for admission to candidacy is then submitted to the dean of the appropriate school or program. Consult the departmental graduate adviser for submission deadlines.

The Dissertation

The dissertation not only is an essential part of the candidate’s degree work but is the appropriate culmination of the Ph.D. degree. The dissertation is the necessary demonstration that the candidate is worthy of taking a place among research scholars in the discipline. It must demonstrate not only mastery of the literature of the subject, but also the ability to carry on independent research that results in a genuine contribution to knowledge or an original interpretation of existing knowledge, and it must do so in a literate and lucid fashion. The dissertation committee shall pass on the acceptability of the dissertation before it is submitted in final form. Acceptability, however, is not final approval. The candidate must defend the dissertation successfully before the degree is awarded. For details, see Final Examination. Consult the dean of the appropriate school or program for regulations regarding formatting of the dissertation and submission deadlines.

A.B. Freeman School of Business

Accounting, M.Acct.

Tulane’s 30 credit-hour program is designed to meet the needs of future accounting professionals. Unique features of the program are the ability to custom design a curriculum based on career aspirations as well as a busy (accounting) season internship. Freeman School students may apply for admission to the Master of Accounting program in the junior year. It is possible to earn both the BSM and MACCT degrees concurrently. (For more information or to apply, please contact: Office of Admissions, Freeman School of Business, Tulane University, New Orleans, LA 70118; 504-865-5410.)

Business Administration, M.B.A.
Business Administration, Ph.D.

The PhD program in business administration at the A. B. Freeman School of Business is a full-time, research-intensive program. The Doctor of Philosophy program is designed for students who want in-depth coverage in preparation for teaching at the college level. It is a four-year, 48 credit-hour program. Students must have earned an undergraduate degree prior to beginning the PhD program. (For more information or to apply, please contact: Office of PhD Admissions, Freeman School of Business, Tulane University, New Orleans, LA 70118; 504-865-5495.)

Finance, M.Fin.

Course work for the finance major covers concepts of valuation, investment and financial structure in corporate financial management. Many finance majors begin their careers in commercial banking, corporate finance, or as analysts in investment banking firms.

In addition to the required courses listed earlier in this section, an undergraduate business student completing the following courses is eligible for transcript designation of a major in finance.

Required Courses

1See Note Below

Plus three of the following courses:
Career Track Recommendations

The following tracks are designed to guide students in choosing finance electives based on possible careers.

Track 1: Corporate Finance

Choose a minimum of three of the following electives:

Track 2: Investments

Choose a minimum of three of the following electives:

Note:

1Students must review the Course Descriptions section to determine the prerequisites needed for each course. Students will not be allowed to enroll in classes if prerequisites have not been met.

School of Architecture

Architecture, M.Arch.

The Master of Architecture program is structured with required courses and electives to give students a thorough professional preparation, and opportunities for study in the liberal arts and for advanced study in architecture. First-year courses include required study in design, visual and digital media, architectural history and theory, and technological systems, in addition to writing, and other electives in cultural knowledge and scientific inquiry. The emphasis in first year design is on developing a fundamental understanding of formal, spatial and material principles in architecture, while obtaining a strong skill base in freehand drawing, descriptive geometry, material techniques, and visual and digital media. First year electives allow students to supplement their background in physics or calculus, to begin or advance foreign language study, to broaden their skill in the arts, or to choose any other subject area from among over forty offered throughout the University’s undergraduate divisions. In their first semester, students will also participate in one of the many TIDES (Tulane Interdisciplinary Experience) offered throughout the university to engage other students and faculty in an intimate interactive environment. Second and third-year courses include the majority of program requirements. Intensive studio work in architectural design is complemented by study in architectural history and theory, structures, technological systems, digital media and urban studies. In the second year, students are fully immersed in digital design techniques while learning to incorporate knowledge from historic, environmental, social, programmatic and technological studies into the design studio. This is followed by a third year, where a fully integrated program of coursework allows students a truly synthetic experience in the comprehensive design of a complex architectural project. The fourth year curriculum involves advanced architectural design in elective studio courses as well as graduate level seminars in architectural theory, technology, professional concerns, urban studies and digital media. In the fourth year of study, emphasis is placed on the relationship of architecture to the urban environment, both locally and globally. Students will spend one semester at the new Tulane City Center, studying in one of the many programs ranging from urban design, to housing, to design-build. After completing third year, students will also have the opportunity for international study, through various programs ranging from one week to full semester abroad programs in Europe, Latin America and Asia. Upper level study is intended to be diverse and includes many electives intended to provide significant opportunities for study within architecture as well as in the liberal arts and sciences. In the fifth year of study, students will develop an advanced thesis through research, analysis and design in one of four curricular streams. In addition to academic year studies, students are also required to spend two summers working in architecture firms in order to gain an understanding of architecture as a profession.

Transfer students with previous college work but without any background in architecture may take an intensive summer curriculum as the equivalent of first-year. The intensive summer program includes no English or general electives because previous college work is a prerequisite. For such students, the Master of Architecture as a first college degree may then be obtained in four additional years.

Curriculum: 5 Year Professional Program: Master of Architecture

The information listed below is incomplete due to curricular revisions. Please refer to http://www.tulane.edu/~tsahome/ for current curricular information and course descriptions

Typical Curricular Schedule
  Credits
First Year – Fall  
Design Studio I (DSGN 110) 4
Visual Media I 2
Writing/English 101 4
University Elective: Cultural Knowledge 3
University Elective: Cultural Knowledge or Foreign Language 3-4
Tulane Interdisciplinary Experience (TIDES) 1
Semester Total: 17-18
   
First Year – Spring  
Design Studio II (DSGN 120) 4
Visual Media I (100 level) 1
Digital Media I (100 level) 1
History of Architecture I (100 level) 3
Technological Systems I (100 level) 3
University Elective: Cultural Knowledge or Scientific Inquiry 3
University Elective: Cultural Knowledge or Foreign Language 3-4
Semester Total: 18-19
   
Second Year – Fall  
Design Studio III (DSGN 210) 6
Digital Media II (200 level) 3
History of Architecture II: Historic Elective (300 level) 3
Technological Systems II (200 level) 3
University Elective: Cultural Knowledge or Scientific Inquiry 3-4
Semester Total: 18-19
   
Second Year – Spring  
Design Studio IV (DSGN 220) 6
Digital Media III (300 level) 3
History of Architecture III: Modern Elective (300 level) 3
Technological Systems III (300 level) 3
University Elective: Cultural Knowledge or Scientific Inquiry 3-4
Semester Total: 18-19
   

Portfolio Review

Third Year – Fall  
Design Studio V (DSGN 310) 6
History, Theory + Analysis I: Contemporary Issues (400 level) 3
Integrated Technology I (400 level) 3
Professional Concerns I: Professional Context (400 level) 3
University Elective: Cultural Knowledge or Scientific Inquiry 3
Semester Total: 18
   
Third Year – Spring  
Design Studio VI (DSGN 320): Architectural Integration 6
Digital Media IV: Digital Fabrication (400 level) 3
History, Theory + Analysis II: Precedent Analysis (400 level) 3
Integrated Technologies II: (400 level) Advanced Structures, Systems, Materials 3
Professional Concerns II: (400 level) Contract Documents, BIM, Programming 3
Semester Total: 18
 

Summer Internship or Foreign Study

Fourth Year – Fall  
Design Studio VII (DSGN 410): TCC/URBANbuild Elective Studio, Advanced Elective Studio or International Study Studio 6
Architecture or Urban Studies Elective (300+ level) 3
Advanced Technology Elective (500/600 level) 3
Advanced Professional Concerns Elective (500/600 level) 3
University Elective (300+ level) 3
Semester Total: 18
   
Fourth Year – Spring  
Design Studio VIII (DSGN 420): TCC/URBANbuild Elective Studio, Advanced Elective Studio or International Study 6
Architecture or Urban Studies Elective (300+ level) 3
Advanced Digital Media Elective (500/600 level) 3
Advanced History/Theory Elective (Writing Intensive) (500/600 level) 4
University Elective (300+ level) 3
Semester Total: 19
   

Summer Internship or Foreign Study

Fifth Year – Fall  
Research + Analysis Studio IX: (DSGN 510) 6
Thesis Studio, Research Studio, Advanced Integrated Studio Advanced Design Research class* (500/600 level) 3
Architecture Elective (400+ level) 3
University Elective (400+ level 3
Semester Total: 15
   
Fifth Year – Spring  
Design Studio X: (DSGN 520) 6
Thesis Studio, Research Studio, Advanced Integrated Studio Advanced Design Research class* (500/600 level) 3
Architecture Elective (400+ level) 3
University Elective (400+ level) 3
Semester Total: 15
   

Summary: 5 Year Professional Program: Master of Architecture

   
Professional Coursework  
   
DESIGN  
6 core Design Studios 32
2 Advanced Elective Studios (1 in the Tulane City Center) 12
Thesis Option Studio: 2 semesters 12
Thesis Studio, Research Studio, or Advanced Integrated Studio  
   
VISUAL/DIGITAL MEDIA  
2 course Visual Media sequence* 3
course Digital Media sequence* 10
1 advanced Digital Media Elective 3
*courses fully integrated with Design Studios  
   
HISTORY/THEORY  
3 course History of Architecture sequence 9
2 course History, Theory + Analysis sequence 6
1 advanced History/Theory elective 4
   
SYSTEMS/TECHNOLOGY  
3 course Technological Systems sequence 9
2 course Integrated Technologies sequence 6
1 advanced Technology elective 3
   
PROFESSIONAL CONCERNS  
2 course Professional Concerns sequence 6
1 advanced Professional Concerns elective 3
Required Professional Credits: 118
 
1 Urban Studies Elective 3
3 Architectural Electives 9
2 Advanced Architectural Research Electives* 6
*(advanced research electives may be taken outside the school of architecture provided the subject area is directly related to thesis)  
Total Professional Credits: 136
Portfolio Review at the Conclusion of Second Year  
   
University Core Curriculum Distribution and Electives  
Tulane Interdisciplinary Experience (TIDE) 1
1 course Writing 4
2 courses in Foreign Language* 8
4 courses in Cultural Knowledge:  

2 Humanities and Fine Arts

6

2 courses Social Sciences

6
3 courses in Scientific Inquiry:  
1 course in Quantitative Reasoning 3-4
2 courses in Physical Sciences Behavioral or Life Sciences* 6-8
3 courses general electives 3
1 course fulfilling distribution or elective requirements must be writing intensive 1

*Technological Systems class fulfills 1 course in Physical Science
*Proficiency at the 102/112 level and at least one foreign language course at Tulane University in the same language.

Total of 13 Courses Outside of Architecture: 42

In addition:

1 course fulfilling distribution or elective requirements listed above must focus on Perspectives in the European Tradition and one on Perspectives outside the European Tradition or Comparative Cultures and International Perspectives non western traditions. Refer to general section of undergraduate catalog on Core Curriculum for more detailed information and competency requirements.

Minimum Credits Required for Graduation: 178

Independent Study

The Independent Study option allows a student with a demonstrated record of academic excellence, to propose a course of individual study in a subject that is not available within the regular curriculum. Under the direction of a faculty member he or she has chosen, the student designs course objectives, methods, content, and requirements. The Associate Dean prior to registration must approve course objectives, requirements, and credit. The student continues to work closely with the faculty adviser throughout the semester through scheduled meetings. Students register for an Independent Study through the School of Architecture academic affairs administrative office. Credit is awarded and final evaluation undertaken jointly by the faculty sponsor and the Associate Dean. Students may enroll in Independent Study for a maximum of six credits with no more than three credits per semester.

Directed Study

Similar to an Independent Study, a Directed Study allows an individual student, or a small number of students to work closely under the direction of a faculty member on a special topic or in a research area of shared interest. The faulty member in consultation with the student(s) develops the objectives, methods, content and requirements of the proposed directed study. These objectives and requirements, as well as course credit must be approved by the Associate Dean. The registration process, credit limitations and final evaluation procedures are the same as that for the Independent Study.

AHST 3300 - Islamic Architecture
AHST 3410 - American Urbanism
APFC 4910 - Architectural Branding

School of Continuing Studies

Liberal Arts, M.L.A.

The Master of Liberal Arts program emphasizes graduate-level reading, thinking, and writing in areas that cross disciplinary lines. The program is designed for full-time students as well as part-time students who are usually already established in their careers. To encourage learning as a continuing challenge, it features the intensity of classroom discussion, the excitement of confronting new ideas, and the advantages of an academic environment. The program draws on the intellectual resources of faculty members from a wide variety of departments who enjoy approaching their academic disciplines from a new direction.

The Master of Liberal Arts program is offered by the School of Continuing Studies. To enroll in the program, a student must first apply to the School of Continuing Studies for admission as a part-time graduate student. Requirements for the degree include completion of two core courses within a single track and seven other graduate-level courses. In addition to the two core courses, seven elective courses drawn from the offerings are required; additional core courses may be taken as electives. During the evening each semester the university offers a broad range of courses in English, history, philosophy, sociology, foreign languages, and literature, among others, which are open to M.L.A. students. Special courses designed exclusively for M.L.A. students are also offered as electives. Finally, completion of a project, normally a thesis, related to the theme of the student’s track or educational plan is required.

After completion of the two core courses, the student is eligible to transfer from the School of Continuing Studies to the school which actually confers the degree. For course numbers and descriptions of the core courses and special offerings, please consult the School of Continuing Studies section of the catalog and the current Schedule of Classes.

School of Law

Law, J.D.

School of Liberal Arts

Anthropology, M.A.
Anthropology, Ph.D.
Art History, M.A.
Art Studio, M.F.A.
Classical Studies, M.A.
Economics (Policy Economics), M.A.
English, M.A.
French and Italian, M.A.
History, M.A.
History, Ph.D.
Interdisciplinary, Ph.D.
Latin American Studies and Art History, Ph.D.
Latin American Studies, M.A.
Latin American Studies, Ph.D.
Music (Musicology, Composition), M.A.
Music (Performance), M.F.A.
Philosophy, M.A.
Philosophy, Ph.D.
Political Science, M.A.
Sociology (Applied Sociology), M.A.
Spanish and Portuguese, M.A.
Spanish and Portuguese, Ph.D.
Theatre, (Design, Technical Production), M.F.A.

School of Public Health and Tropical Medicine

4+1 Program in Public Health – B.S.P.H./M.P.H.

The 4+1 program allows outstanding students to complete the requirements for both undergraduate and master’s degrees at the School of Public Health and Tropical Medicine in a period of five years. With permission of the deans of undergraduate and graduate admissions at the School of Public Health and Tropical Medicine, students may opt to study towards the Bachelor of Science in Public Health (BSPH) and Master of Public Health (MPH) or Master of Science in Public Health (MSPH) degrees. Up to 15 credit hours of graduate coursework can be applied towards the undergraduate degree requirements. In such cases, students may fulfill both bachelor’s and master’s degree requirements in as few as 30 credit hours beyond the BSPH coursework.

Program admission takes effect at the beginning of the student’s senior year (i.e., upon completion of 90 credit hours). Students must achieve a minimum cumulative grade point average of 3.000 in their public health courses to be eligible. Formal enrollment in the Graduate Program follows receipt of the BSPH and maintenance of a B (3.000) or higher in all graduate program coursework. Students are encouraged to work closely with their academic advisers to ensure that the requirements of the 4+1 program, the BSPH degree, and the MPH or MSPH degree are met.

The general outline of the proposed 4+1 program is as follows:

Years 1-4  Minimum Total of 121 credit hours.
   
Year 5 15 credit hours of advanced public health core courses waived from the undergraduate public health degree.
   
  30 credit hours of additional public health courses taken at the graduate level. Students can NOT retake an undergraduate cross-listed class and count it towards the Master’s degree.
   
  Capstone - an integrative experience is required. The capstone may be a practicum, a research project with thesis, a capstone course, or a comprehensive exam, depending on the program.

In order to apply for the 4+1 program, the following materials must be submitted to the Admissions Office in the School of Public Health and Tropical Medicine:

Biostatistics, M.S.P.H.
Community Health Sciences, M.P.H.
Environmental Health Sciences, M.P.H.

The Environmental Health Sciences major is designed to fulfill all the pre-med course requirements. Graduates of this program are eligible to apply for programs in the health professions, including medicine, dentistry, optometry, osteopathy, podiatry, and veterinary medicine and are also qualified to sit for national certification which will enhance their advancement and employment opportunities.

This major emphasizes recognition, evaluation, and control of environmental health problems. This includes application of basic environmental health principles to problem solving, use of laboratory and quantitative methods to generate and evaluate environmental health data, and use of computer technology to calculate, analyze and display data.

Basic Core Curriculum (21-22 credit hours)

Students must complete the following undergraduate public health core courses regardless of area of major. All courses are three (3) credit hours.

Environmental Health Sciences, M.S.P.H.

The Environmental Health Sciences major is designed to fulfill all the pre-med course requirements. Graduates of this program are eligible to apply for programs in the health professions, including medicine, dentistry, optometry, osteopathy, podiatry, and veterinary medicine and are also qualified to sit for national certification which will enhance their advancement and employment opportunities.

This major emphasizes recognition, evaluation, and control of environmental health problems. This includes application of basic environmental health principles to problem solving, use of laboratory and quantitative methods to generate and evaluate environmental health data, and use of computer technology to calculate, analyze and display data.

Basic Core Curriculum (21-22 credit hours)

Students must complete the following undergraduate public health core courses regardless of area of major. All courses are three (3) credit hours.

Advanced Curriculum (15 credit hours)

Beginning in the junior year, students take the six advanced public health core courses as part of their undergraduate experience. These courses also serve as a bridge for those wishing to enter the 4/1 BSPH/MSPH program. The core courses in the graduate public health curriculum include:

Required Courses
Epidemiology, M.P.H.
Health Systems Management, M.P.H.
International Health and Development, M.P.H.
Tropical Medicine, M.S.P.H.
TRMD 7010 - MEDICAL HELMINTHOLOGY
TRMD 7030 - MEDICAL PROTOZOOLOGY
TRMD 7060 - MEDICAL ENTOMOLOGY
TRMD 7070 - METHODS IN PARASITE CELL BIOLOGY AND IMMUNOLOGY
TRMD 7080 - PARASITOLOGIC METHODS
TRMD 7130-7140 - SPECIAL PROBLEMS
TRMD 7150-7160 - SEMINAR
TRMD 7170 - IMMUNOLOGY
TRMD 7180 - IMMUNOPARASITOLOGY
TRMD 7190-7200 - RESEARCH
TRMD 7820 - MALARIA
TRMD 9980 - MASTER'S RESEARCH
TRMD 9990 - DISSERTATION RESEARCH

School of Science and Engineering

Biology, Ph.D.
Biomedical Engineering, M.S.
Biomedical Engineering, Ph.D.
Cell and Molecular Biology, M.S.
Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering, M.S.
Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering, Ph.D.
Chemistry, M.S.
Chemistry, Ph.D.
Earth and Environmental Science, M.S.
Earth and Environmental Science, Ph.D.
Ecology and Evolutionary Biology, M.S.
Environmental Science, M.S.
Mathematics, M.S.
Mathematics, Ph.D.
Neuroscience, M.S.
Neuroscience, Ph.D.
Physics, M.S.
Physics, Ph.D.
Psychology, M.S.
Psychology, Ph.D.
Statistics, M.S.

School of Social Work

Social Work, M.S.W.

The School currently offers the Master of Social Work, a 60 credit (4 semesters full time and 8 semesters part time) program leading to the MSW. Working with the Undergraduate College, the school offers an interdisciplinary major and minor in “Social Policy and Practice” within the School of Liberal Arts. This new program is based on a social justice model.

School of Medicine

Medicine, M.D.
BMSP 6070 - Cell Biology
BMSP 7100 - Workshop
BMSP 7110 - Workshop
BMSP 7120 - Research Methods
BMSP 7130 - Research Methods
BMSP 7140 - Seminar
BMSP 7150 - Seminar
BMSP 7770 - Systems Biology
BMSP 7990 - Independent Study
EPID 7810 - Human Molecular Genetics
GBCH 6010 - Biochemistry
GBCH 7250 - Biostatistics
HMGN 7010 - Human Genetics Seminar
HMGN 7020 - Human Genetics
HMGN 7030 - Clinical Aspects of Human Genetics
HMGN 7040 - Human Cytogenetics
HMGN 7050 - Biochemical Genetics
HMGN 7060 - Human Molecular Genetics
HMGN 7950 - Research Methods
HMGN 7980-7990 - Special Projects
HMGN 9990 - Dissertation Research