Chemical Engineering, B.S.E.

The coursework necessary to graduate with a B.S. degree in Chemical Engineering can be grouped into the following categories: (1) the engineering courses, including the core chemical engineering courses, engineering technical electives, and the advanced chemistry courses; (2) the basic science and mathematics sequence, which also satisfy the universitys scientific inquiry requirements; (3) the universitys cultural knowledge (humanities, fine arts, and social science) elective courses, TIDES, public service, and the writing requirement; and (4) the technical/engineering elective courses.

The department offers great flexibility in the choice of technical/engineering electives. This flexibility provides the student with significant exposure to technical and business fields that are distinct from chemical engineering, but that help develop complementary skills very useful to a chemical engineers career goals. This is done by developing a concentrations-oriented sequence of technical electives in biomolecular engineering, environmental studies, or materials engineering. Students who wish to obtain advanced degrees in chemical engineering may also take introductory level graduate courses to enhance preparation for graduate school. Students who do not wish to specialize in the concentration-oriented technical elective sequence have a wide variety of courses from which to choose their technical electives.

A Typical Course Curriculum is described below.


First Year

Fall Semester

Total Credits 17

Spring Semester

Total Credits 15

Second Year

Fall Semester

Total Credits 17

Spring Semester

Total Credits 17

Third Year

Fall Semester

Total Credits 15

Spring Semester

Total Credits 15/16

Fourth Year

Fall Semester

Total Credits 15/16

Spring Semester

Total Credits 15

Note(s):

*Advanced Chemistry course can be chosen from Applied Biochemistry (CENG 445/446), Physical Chemistry (CHEM 311, 312), Inorganic Chemistry (CHEM 321) or Biochemistry (CHEM 383, 384). Other courses with permission only


The Concentrations Oriented Curriculum

Technical Electives

In addition to the required core chemical engineering courses, the basic science and mathematics sequence, and the cultural knowledge courses, four technical electives will be required; two of which must be in one of the engineering subject areas (e.g. CENG, BMEN, ENGR, or ENGP). These technical electives may (but need not) constitute a concentration in one of the four areas: biomolecular engineering, environmental studies, and materials engineering. A concentration consists of four courses in the following tracks:


1. Biomolecular Engineering

And 4 courses chosen from:

2. Environmental Studies

3. Materials Engineering

And 3 courses chosen from:

Note(s):

With the exception of Environmental Studies, each of the above concentrations contains two or more courses from an engineering subject area. Note that for the Environmental Studies concentration, additional engineering courses will be required to satisfy the engineering technical elective requirement.


Other Technical Electives

Technical electives are normally engineering, science, math, or approved business courses.


Approved business courses are

Undergraduate Core Requirements

The following courses are required by the university to obtain a degree:

Certain modifications to the freshman program may be made by:

Achievement of advanced standing through Advanced Placement Tests offered by the CEEB.

Use of advanced placement tests in mathematics and chemistry offered on campus during Orientation Week.

Submission of transcripts from other universities for equivalent courses taken prior to entering Tulane.

Each freshman is assigned an individual faculty advisor early in the first semester and is expected to consult with him or her regularly. Each upper class is assigned a faculty member to serve as the advisor. Faculty members keep posted office hours for that purpose and are readily available for conferences.

ROTC courses ROTC courses, if elected, are taken in addition to the normal courses. ROTC students may receive 6 technical elective credits for their ROTC courses.


Cooperative Work Program

Students in the Chemical Engineering Program may participate in the department's cooperative work program. This program allows students considering employment after the B.S. degree to gain valuable work experience in the chemical engineering field during their undergraduate career. In the Fall semester of their second year, students are interviewed by employers for three individual work periods (the two summers following the second and third years of study and part-time during the spring semester of the fourth year). To participate, students must commit to work for the same employer during all three sessions. Those who complete all three sessions with satisfactory performance will receive six credits at the conclusion of the fourth year spring semester and do not have to register for Practice School to graduate. Students who stop participating in the program must register for Practice School during the spring semester of their fourth year of study. All exceptions to these guidelines must be decided by the department's undergraduate curriculum committee.


Premedical Curriculum in Chemical Engineering

 A premedical program via the chemical engineering curriculum provides an excellent foundation for medical studies. If the student does not proceed to medical school, there is an opportunity for a professional career in industry.

Premedical students make the following changes:


Minor and Second Majors

A Chemical Engineering student may also elect to pursue a major or minor in another division of the university. Anyone who is interested should contact the appropriate department chair and work out a program of courses. This should be approved by the department chair and forwarded to the engineering dean’s office. When all requirements are met, the transcript will reflect that a major or minor has been completed.

Many of the engineering students elect to add a minor in business or a minor or major in mathematics; these are described in the appropriate sections of the catalog. Students contemplating either a minor or major in mathematics should consult with the major advisor in the Department of Mathematics during the spring of the sophomore year.